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  1. 16 likes
    There's a lot of misinformation going on about what baseball was like at the turn of the century, so as a public service announcement I will clear a few things up. 1. Baseball was by far and away the most popular team sport in nearly every area of this country from the advent of the Civil War all the way up to the start of the baby boom. This is not disputable. Major League Baseball was a successful and established sports league decades before the NBA or NFL were even thoughts. The most successful renegade league in pro sports history the American League came about in large part because of the success one could have in the Wild West culture that was baseball at the turn of the century. What this means is that one cannot merely look to Major Leauge Baseball as a sign of the game's popularity at this time. Yes if you look at the attendance numbers of regular season games, it looks sad by comparison. Your average Major League team only draws about 5,000 fans a game. It doesn't seem like much, but keep in mind most fans are getting around by horse and buggy. Your population base is limited to the neighborhood your in. Beyond that lies thousands of minor-league, semi-pro, factory, business and church league teams that were each capable of drawing at least several hundred fans a game. You add those in, and the real popularity of the game becomes much clearer. 2. You could access the results of the game as it happened before the advent of radio, thanks to the Telegraph. Bars would have these installed and turn them into media news feeds to get the results of the game as it happened. If you were in a city, it wouldn't be uncommon to install a makeshift scoreboard in a public gathering space to read off results and display them as they happened. Here's a picture of Times Square during the 1912 World Series between the Red Sox and Giants showing this. That is an electronic scoreboard that would light up and display as best it could a virtual reality experience of what was happening on the field. Amazingly cutting-edge technology at the time. People came from over 200 miles away to Times Square in 1912, to see this board. 3. Major League teams may not have existed West of the Mississippi, but there are semi-pro and factory league teams that started play within years of the city or town they played in being incorporated. The Pacific Coast League dates itself all the way back to 1903. Most of the original teams played in California. California wasn't even a state until 1850, and within five decades it built up the economic system to support the most successful minor league in major professional sports history. How the Japanese League compares to Major League Baseball is how roughly the Pacific Coast League compared to Major League Baseball well into the 1950's. One of the reasons the reasons the Yankees made a then 21-year old Joe DiMaggio the sixth highest paid player on the team before even playing a Major League game was because he was perfectly content to spend the rest of his career playing for the San Francisco Seals if it came to it. Before he signed with the Yankees, he was making around $5,500 a year with the Seals, which is about $100,000 in today's money. Your average career minor leaguer in AAA today earns less than $30,000 playing ball and no baseball player in the 1930's was making the equivalent of $30,000,000 in today's money. DiMaggio was making more money as a teenager playing for the Seals than some everyday Major League starters. No Pacific Coast league team was ever in a position to outspend a Major League team, but its nowhere near as lopsided as most may think it was. The best offer a Major League team could realistically present to a PCL player was to triple his current salary. Its a quality of life jump, but it's not life-changing money. Picture being a pro wrestler in the 1980's going from the NWA to the WWF. That's about as close of a parallel as I can draw. Push comes to shove most want to go there if given the opportunity, but it's not like the other side isn't without its benefits, and some may even be willing to stay over money. Same with the PCL. 4. The only thing to come out of New York City with regards to spreading baseball was a set of standardized rules. That's all the New York Knickerbocker club provided. To claim a year when baseball is invented is like measuring the fog. Ball and stick games go back to the times of the Egyptians. Baseball's origins are about as old as the invention of agriculture. To suggest a few bankers from New York City were solely responsible for the popularization of the orientation of a sport that had been around for several millennia does a tremendous disservice to the incredibly complicated nature of how modern baseball developed. All 13 colonies enjoyed some various form of a ball and stick game with a differing set of rules depending on the region. None of these games was baseball as we know it today, but all had elements of what would one day become baseball. The sport doesn't begin to even resemble its modern-day form until the late 1880's. Before that, the game is about as standardized as beer pong, all the way down to not even being able to 100% agree on what actually to call it. Curveballs may be illegal to throw. Run limits may be in place. Gloves may or may not be permitted. The quality and types of balls used are all over the place. Mounds and bases have no set dimensions. Drinking may be encouraged or outright banned. To try to put all of this in a neat and tidy perspective is impossible. Baseball is just another take on a game that's as old as recorded history.
  2. 14 likes
    This is a REALLY bad take. Wanna see attendance numbers fall through the floor? Do this.
  3. 11 likes
    How about we go back to CCM/Koho before Reebok took over? No stupid curved hem, no stupid piping that goes nowhere, no stupid looking collars, no stripes that don't actually go all the way around, and jerseys that actually have hem stripes. Sure, they might have been heavier than everything that's come out since Reebok, but was that really a big issue?
  4. 7 likes
    OK after seeing today's game, I am all in on Kelly green for the Jets. My only gripe is that it was color rush, so they were wearing green from head to toe. White pants will be needed for the home look... Green pants on the road with white socks will be fine
  5. 6 likes
  6. 6 likes
    Not bad guys, but what if we took that and gave it white pants instead to really take after the throwback all the way? Like just go all out with it head to toe? Im terrible at photoshop so please excuse the roughness, but this is what I’m getting at:
  7. 5 likes
    Hello to you all again! I’m pleased to announce that I am returning from a long hiatus from this site. I must admit that full time work has gotten the best of me, but recently I found a little down time to do some design work Now on to the concept. Recently, I decided to attempt to redesign an awful logo set that belongs to a local highschool, the Selinsgrove Seals. I’ve done these types of threads in the past, and hopefully, if I can find the time to do so, I might try to tackle some more local high schools. I might even take requests and do jersey overhauls as well. But for now, I will simply be presenting logos. Selingsgrove has about three logos they use the most, two for athletics, and one for the school in general. To start off, I did the school logo. Here is the original: I wanted to create a more original monogram. Looking at various seal silhouettes, I discovered by rotating a swimming seal by a few degrees, it looked like it formed the top curve of a “s”. So in my preliminary sketch, I took that idea and ran with it: My digital version didn’t change much from the sketch, I mainly just cleaned up the edges and tried to make the s ends match more evenly: Based on this logo, I also came up with these few logo/word mark combos: Now onto the sport logo overhaul. The Seals seem to alternate between these two options: In my opinion, neither of them look very seal like. The bottom one is almost reminiscent of a bird, at least that’s what I thought when I first saw it The main thing I wanted to bring out in my design was a clear seal likeness, or at least a better attempt at it. I also wanted to create a sleek, modern logo that would look good in multiple different applications. To save time, I created a logo progression chart to show my work from the sketch to the final concept: Throughout the process, I realized the head was a bit too catlike, and large (not thin enough) compared to my reference. So over time I tried to slim it down and adjust line weight. You’ll probably notice about half way through I adjusted the color scheme as well. I couldn’t find the right balance with trying to incorporate more red, so I reverted to a color scheme that was more similar to the original logo. In the end, here are the final results in application: Just to “seal” the set, I also came up with a quick color sheet: That’s all I have for now, my apologies for this novel of a post Your critiques/comments are welcome and appreciated.
  8. 5 likes
    Two fumble recoveries, two interceptions, a blocked punt for safety, three more Todd Gurley touchdowns. *Insert hilarious “Ram It” gif* 7-0
  9. 5 likes
    Husker fans call it the "Surrender Whites". Traditionally Nebraska has worn red pants with the road uniform since the mid-1960s. During Tom Osborne's entire career, they wore all-white uniforms only four times, once for the 1991 Citrus Bowl against Georgia Tech (tied for most points an Osborne-coached team allowed in a game), and then they experimented with the look again during the 1992 season, wearing them three times, losing twice. The third one is the most ignominious, as it came against an Iowa State team that finished 4-7. It was arguably the worst team Osborne ever lost to in his entire career. Two weeks later against Oklahoma, the red pants came back and the Huskers won 33-9. If you ever have a conversation with a Nebraska fan about all-white uniforms, this game will almost inevitably come up. Nebraska didn't wear the combination again during Osborne's career.... and you could say the next few years went okay. Then in 2002 this happened: This was the 7-7 season which is the one that broke the 9+ win streak and was the really the most tangible evidence that the program was in decline. So these were scapegoated heavily and thrown onto the trash heap. In 2003 they reverted back to the "normal" uniform and went 10-3. Then during the god-awful Bill Callahan area and various times afterward, Nebraska started doing it again. Another shameful episode was the last game of the 2007 season when they gave up 65 points to Colorado, which ended up being Callahan's pink slip. They also tried it a few times in the Riley era, most recently in the Music City Bowl a couple of years ago where they were hammered by Tennessee (who wore god-awful monochrome gray outfits). I believe Nebraska's overall record in the "traditional" all-white uniform (counting 2002 but not the alternates) is something like 4-13 overall since the red pants were first introduced in the 60s. So Nebraska's poor overall record in those (as well as a couple of infamously embarrassing performances in them) has contributed to this culture. Many will also say monochrome red is cursed. It was only done one time, against Oklahoma in 1986, and the result was a blown 4th quarter lead when Oklahoma scored twice in the last 90 seconds. They never did this again: Since Nebraska has more or less sucked the last 15 years after being elite for a generation, along with the recent tradition of adding a (usually terrible) alternate uniform, a lot of that talk has kind of subsided a bit. One could argue that this abomination was successful since they actually won (and to date it is our only win over Wisconsin since joining the Big 10).
  10. 5 likes
    Terrific post, best sport. How did we ever let football replace baseball in our hearts? We're a nation of idiots.
  11. 5 likes
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  13. 4 likes
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  15. 4 likes
    I like this idea a lot. The white ones would look even cooler because they'd remind you of the throwback whites so much. Rough mock up:
  16. 4 likes
    What the Niners should really do is take those throwbacks and use them as inspiration for a new uniform set. This is just a concept I made up myself, but I think they could maybe look something like this.
  17. 4 likes
    I appreciate all the feedback! Thanks. I got a little carried away with detail for the logo. Might end up streamlining it, depending on how much time I have. I get the criticisms. If I end up reworking the logo, I'll probably have to change the number font, and if it ends up as more of a block font it'll probably have a red stroke. A stroke just didn't work with this ornamental of a font. Until then, here are a couple of other jersey options, including the home w/ red pants. Thanks. Without the stripe, it just becomes a blue blob, which is probably a sign that the logo isn't bold enough. Next up, the Pittsburgh Steelers! I really like just about everything about their current identity, even their italic Futura jersey numbers. But in this series, no team is untouchable, so here we go. This concept is essentially a modernization of their 1967 "Batman" uniforms. The yellow yoke returns, with a notch added on each shoulder that's about the same width as their helmet striping. The Steelers are pretty much the ideal grey-facemask team, so I brought those back, and dropped the grey stripe from their simplified primary logo so the helmets didn't get too grey-heavy. The primary-colored star shapes from the logo are the most criminally underutilized part of their current identity, so they'll show up on the pants striping and back of the collars from now on. The alternate goes full yellow and black monochrome like their color rush, with a black-background version of their logo. I was really digging the black pants I came up with for the alternate, which got me wondering why the Steelers never wear black pants. Now they can for a handful of games every year. They'd look pretty sharp under the lights. I was surprised how much I liked the monochrome black look with the primary home jersey. The yellow yoke does a great job balancing the black. I also threw in some white pants for the road if it's really hot or something. I don't know if the Steelers are ever gonna make wholesale changes to their identity again, but in the event that they do, this is what I want to see. Let me know what you think!
  18. 4 likes
    http://www.gridiron-uniforms.com/GUD/vikings.shtml
  19. 3 likes
    White pants and white sleeves. Without the white sleeves, they’re just the Green Colts.
  20. 3 likes
    I don't know what's more beautiful, the fact that they've finally patched things up with Kariya enough for him to allow them to retire his number or that it's in the proper colors. I wish I could have been there, because Kariya has always been one of my favorite players.
  21. 3 likes
    Dallas vs. Washington is beautiful. A good red/blue color balance. The Mustard vs. Mayo matchup looked ok. And the Raven purple pants are the best thing ever. Especially with contrasting socks.
  22. 3 likes
    Dallas vs. Washington is nice. I’ve been so glad to see the burgundy/white and white/burgundy combos come back. Not that the gold pants are bad at all, I just think these other combos look so much better. I hope they keep this up all year long.
  23. 3 likes
    Get rid of the football and the shield and this will be a perfect logo to celebrate Obama's 100th birthday.
  24. 3 likes
  25. 3 likes
    It’s too bad Oregon and Washington State aren’t playing at Eastern Michigan’s Rynearson Stadium.
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