John in KY

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About John in KY

  1. I always thought that the 3-stripe socks were a slight throwback to the 1984-1992 uniforms - they had white socks with red/blue/red worn with both white and red pants.
  2. It always amazes me how many of these graphics gets this wrong - that is the 1976/76 jersey that this graphic identifies as the 1976/77 championship jersey. Here is the road version of the two-color yellow and light blue version in action in March 1976 against Indiana: The graphic is CORRECT. John in KY is wrong. The graphic was from Marquette Athletics. Here are images of most Marquette basketball jerseys with the year it came out from Marquette Athletics: http://www.pinterest.com/muathletics/golden-traditions/ They may have started the 1976-77 season in the two-color yellow and blue set but they won it in the white home jersey/blue road jersey/metallic gold shorts that they had been wearing through most of the season - at least after January 1, 1977. I would think that Marquette Athletics would have wanted to put the NCAA Championship set and correctly identify it. I was 14 in 1977 and watched pretty much every NCAA game that was on - Marquette was frequently on the NBC game of the week and they had definitely stopped wearing the yellow home set by the time I caught my first Marquette game that season in January 1977. Uniforms back then weren't changed as often as they are now - Marquette was an exception because of Al McGuire's relationship with Sand-Knit so you always wanted to see what they would come out with. But they didn't hold the white home/metallic gold version for the NCAA Tournament; they wore it most of the season. And they had 2 sets of gold shorts - with the white jersey they had blue/white/blue stripes, with the blue jersey the gold shorts had blue/gold/blue stripes. Sorry - I can't access the pinterest site from here; it's blocked.
  3. It always amazes me how many of these graphics gets this wrong - that is the 1976/76 jersey that this graphic identifies as the 1976/77 championship jersey. Here is the road version of the two-color yellow and light blue version in action in March 1976 against Indiana:
  4. Not really unique, except maybie n the NFL. Several Colleges (Including Ohio State, Duke, and BYU used this style of helmet. Back in the 60s MacGregor helmets had that external pad as an option, and several colleges used them. They were discontinued because they found that they caused more head injuries than they prevented. Willie Lanier and either Gene Upshaw or Art Shell (I think it was Shell) continued to have these pads added to their helmets throughout their careers. Great find - I have never seen that. Do you know the story behind it? That one has been on Helmet Hut - Namath had laryngitis so this was an attempt to amplify his voice so he could practice and play. By game day he had recovered enough that it was never used in a game, only in practices so he could rest his voice a bit.
  5. How about Virginia Tech's study? It's reasonably impartial. Interestingly enough one of the relatively "traditional" looking Rawlings helmets is #2, right behind the fairly over-engineered looking Riddell 360 helmet. The Xenix (also relatively "traditional" looking) is #3. I would have thought that Bill Simpson's helmet would have scored higher, but it came in as a 4-star helmet (#5 on the VT list) given his experience in racing. Here's the link: http://www.sbes.vt.edu/nid.php
  6. Since no one has mentioned it - there were no facemasks in any color but gray until the Chargers went to yellow in 1974 (and the Chiefs also switched to white facemasks prior to the season but the Chargers were first). You could also say they were first team to darken their uniforms, going from columbine blue to dark royal that same year. Agreed - but the cynic in me still thinks that Nike developed that style for the Broncos just to show off their new jersey template with the "batwing" extensions of the side panels. Very effective color choices as the orange side panels pop out from the navy jersey. IMO, the Chargers started that trend in 1988 when they switched to navy. Or the cowboys did in the sixties by going navy instead of royal? PsshThe Cowboys didn't change to navy until 1981. The royal might have gotten a bit darker in 1964 but it wasn't that much darker than the 1960-1963.
  7. Bluesky - personally I also love Dallas' dark royal blue and a unique silver blue color that they used to use; I think it's time for them to retire navy and silver. If anything I think New England owns that combination now. Also wtf - I upgraded to IE11 it won't let me quote a post in my post?
  8. By the way it's "Riddell"; not "Riddle"; and you'll only have to hate it until training camp next year.
  9. Sorry, as good a story as last season was particularly in light of Kevin Ware's injury that's only #2 to me. I think the 1980 NCAA Championship was bigger - that was the first championship for the school and was really a huge deal for a city that had lost its pro basketball team (and kind of felt screwed out of being in the NBA when the Colonels were left out of the merger) and its minor league baseball team during the 1970s. I was a HS Senior that year and it really brought the city and the school together in a big way. More perspective - U of L was a city-supported university until 1972 when it became part of the entire state university system. The school went from about 6,500 students to 17,000 pretty much overnight. While the Commonwealth was providing funds to UK to build a football stadium, U of L used all their funds to build buildings for students. It went from being this little school known for engineering, law school and medical school to being that "little brother" that Joe B. Hall called it to jab at Denny Crum. The 1980 Championship was "little brother" announcing they had grown up a bit; the next announcement came in the 1983 NCAA Regional Final. The 1980 championship team was a very close #2 but the only reason it wasn't #1 was because the 2013 team was the first Louisville team to win a championship when I was alive then. Still, I love the 1980 team because of Griffith (Dr. Dunkenstien!) and Denny Crum's coaching mentality. I perfectly understand - complete difference in perspective based on age. If you're under 30 the 1980 and 1986 championships would just be history; it's a different thing to have lived through them.
  10. Sorry, as good a story as last season was particularly in light of Kevin Ware's injury that's only #2 to me. I think the 1980 NCAA Championship was bigger - that was the first championship for the school and was really a huge deal for a city that had lost its pro basketball team (and kind of felt screwed out of being in the NBA when the Colonels were left out of the merger) and its minor league baseball team during the 1970s. I was a HS Senior that year and it really brought the city and the school together in a big way. More perspective - U of L was a city-supported university until 1972 when it became part of the entire state university system. The school went from about 6,500 students to 17,000 pretty much overnight. While the Commonwealth was providing funds to UK to build a football stadium, U of L used all their funds to build buildings for students. It went from being this little school known for engineering, law school and medical school to being that "little brother" that Joe B. Hall called it to jab at Denny Crum. The 1980 Championship was "little brother" announcing they had grown up a bit; the next announcement came in the 1983 NCAA Regional Final.
  11. Count me among those who suspect the helmets will not have manufacturers' logos; they will do whatever the team currently does with non-Riddell helmets, meaning a few teams will go blank (Chiefs and Steelers come to mind) and most others will use some kind of team logo. Since the main reason the NFL keeps giving for ending the deal is so they don't promote one company over another, they will go with covering all company logos and leave it up to the team to stay blank or to go with a team logo. I suppose we might see the Steelers and Chiefs even add their team wordmark to the helmet.
  12. It won't change things much at all. The only difference is that other manufacturer logos will be allowed on the helmets. The NFL's deal with Riddell is a branding deal, nothing more. As it stands now, players can wear any number of pre-approved helmets, but the front bumper has to either be left blank or use a team logo. You can see this when Aaron Rodgers switched from a Riddell to Schutt during the 2010 season: Starting next year, he can wear this front bumper: But that's the only difference. I guess we will have to wait until next year to see which way the NFL goes - either they will go this way and allow all the manufacturer logos to show on one of the two bumpers (since almost all designs these days have front and rear bumpers with the manufacturer's logo) or if they go the other way and Riddell helmets will now have their logo replaced with the team logo. I remember back in the late 1980s (just before the NFL signed that deal with Riddell) that some teams would leave the manufacturer logo in place while others would replace it with the team logo - I guess we could even see this become a team-by-team thing. I also don't think this will stop anyone from wearing a "substandard" helmet either - those guys who love their Riddell VSR-4s, Shutt Air Advantages and Shutt Pro Air IIs (although Marvin Harrison might be the only guy left still wearing a Pro Air II, and who knows if he'll try a comeback after surgery on his ACL) will still be wearing them until their equipment managers can't find any more replacement shells/padding for them.
  13. That isn't the true throwback jersey. That is the "double star" alternate they wore for a while in the 90s. These photos are from Thanksgiving 2001. Dallas's history with these "Apex1 double stars" was: 1. white double star worn at least 2 times in 1994 (was one time a playoff game with the 49ers?) because they had the patch in two different places 2. blue double star worn as the blue jersey in 1995 (may have been only worn once) 3. blue double star as Thanksgiving special jersey from 2001-2003 The white/navy fauxbacks replaced the blue "Apex1 double star" as the Thanksgiving jerseys in 2004. Maybe the NFL will relax these helmet rules in a year or two and we will see throwbacks again.
  14. I'm with you on all this. Thirded right here. Except I would go as far as saying that I prefer the white uniform, even with all its easily fixable flaws, to the contrived blue set. Seriously, Cowboys. Just change all shades of silver to a bluish-silver, darken the royal blue a little, come up with a matching blue jersey, and you'd instantly have one of the best looks in the game. Basically, look how you looked when Roger Staubach was your quarterback. Oh, and you should probably get over yourselves and wear blue at home, too. That metallic blue-silver and royal blue color scheme is amazing. If the Cowboys went back to that, they would own it to such a degree no other team would be able to wear anything close. Why so many board members here want to make them just another navy blue and silver team is beyond me. Yep - still the Cowboys as they were when I grew up. By the way when they wear the navy/silver set while the jersey and pants match the helmet is still "blue-er" and doesn't match.
  15. He won't spend money on fitting the helmets. I still think it's the NFL running scared after the concussion settlement. They are envisioning a lawsuit from a player suffering a severe head injury while wearing the 1-2 times per year throwback versus wearing their regular helmet - particularly if the player say normally wears a Riddell VSR-4 (which has been discontinued for several years), the team can't come up with a VSR-4 for him, he has to wear something else and then suffers the injury because he wasn't used to the other helmet. At least that is what was stated in one of Lucas's posts in his ESPN column where he interviewed one of his equipment manager contacts who declined to be identified. I think that's a pretty flimsy rationale - that long-time VSR-4 wearer is eventually going to have to switch any way, and the newer helmets should be more protective. But I'm sure that this decision was partially driven by someone in their legal department.