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Found 5 results

  1. It's been a long time since I've done an alternate history, my previous two, the original Ottawa Senators http://boards.sportslogos.net/topic/73848-what-if-the-original-senators-never-folded/ and the Montreal Maroons http://boards.sportslogos.net/topic/73802-what-if-the-maroons-never-folded/ Got some great opinions. but someone mentioned an idea (and I wish I remembered who) that intrigued me enough to go after, because it's nowhere near as straightforward as one would think. What if the NHL had taken more teams from the World Hockey Association? Of course we know that the NHL absorbed the Hartford Whalers, Quebec Nordiques, Winnipeg Jets, and Edmonton Oilers before the 1979-80 season, what if they took four more? Joining the NHL in this hypothetical are: Birmingham Bulls Houston Aeros Indianapolis Racers Cincinnati Stingers along with the usual 4. Now, this will cause some difficulties, for instance, the Minnesota North Stars wouldn't move to Dallas if there's already a team in Houston. Columbus won't be an NHL city if there's already a team in Cincinnati, and so on. However, I like following Doctor Who time travel logic in that some things are meant to be, so there'll be some familiar looks and logos throughout. So without further ado, the first team to be unveiled will be: Cincinnati Stingers Upon entry to the NHL, the Boston Bruins threw a fit over Cincinnati's jerseys, and rightfully so. They had just lost the battle over keeping the Pittsburgh Penguins away from black and gold, they wouldn't be beaten twice. The color they would add? Cincinnati Red. However, there wasn't time to redesign the uniforms that first season, and until proper jerseys could be ordered, red fabric was sewn overtop the original stripes. It would work for the first season. 1979-80 1980-88 The gold is lightened to yellow and a new look and logo introduced for the season. The Stingers were here to stay. 1988-94 At the end of the 1980s, teams were being discouraged from using gold at home in lieu of a white jersey. Cincinnati changes their home gold to white. To be continued...
  2. Uglybus

    The Football Landscape

    In the mid 1980s, the St. Louis Football Cardinals were looking for a new home. Their current stadium was getting old and was in need of a replacement. They later decided to move their franchise to Phoenix. But what if this stadium was built? During the same time in Oklahoma City, a tax plan was being voted on. A part of this plan was to build the stadium above in the State Fairgrounds. A dome with a capacity of 70,000, it would have been sure to gain an NFL team. Too bad the bill was shot down. But what if it hadn't? Instead of moving to Phoenix, what if the Cardinals went to Oklahoma instead? How would this butterfly effect the NFL as a whole? And most importantly of all, what would the uniforms look like? Together with @FDW and @neo_prankster, We will be presenting the world where one stadium can change Earth and it's sports forever.
  3. I've created an alternate history of what would become today's equivalent to the NHL. It all starts with two independent leagues, the Continental Hockey Association(CHA) and the Pacific Hockey League(PHL) The CHA, founded in Quebec City in 1917 began with 6 teams across New England and Eastern Canada. The PHL, founded in Vancouver in 1920 began with 6 teams across British Columbia, Washington and Oregon. This thread will give a timeline of the expansion and eventual merging of these two leagues with logos that I have created for the teams. Please feel free to give feedback and criticism. First I will give you a chart that shows the teams in the CHA and PHL and the map above. CHA North Division Quebec City Harfangs Moncton Maroons Halifax Citadels South Division Bangor Blue Stockings Portland Lobsters Boston Colonials PHL North Division Vancouver Killer Whales Victoria Thunderbirds Kelowna Kermodes South Division Seattle Cascades Spokane Chiefs Portland Pioneers I will start the Timeline in the next post and start incorporating logos. In the meantime feel free to give feedback and suggestions.
  4. I am designing an alternate universe league, complete with a history and team names, logos, uniforms, the whole shebang. I will essentially operate as the design company for the league, working with the owners to design the teams. Like a real-life league, most decisions will be partially up to the owner and partially up to the league. For example, each owner will pick a city, but the league will vote among 4 owner-provided options for nicknames. Owner picks team colors, pending league approval. Etc. It will be 2 leagues of 8-12 teams each with a week 16 championship game between the two league winners. I’m currently building a website for the league through which everyone can follow along, and this thread will contain all the history and designs, updated as they are created. I’m likely going to add people in waves. The league will start with 8 owners and expand from there over the course of the off season. NEWS: Scheduled unveilings: Feb. 11, 2014 Denver Drillers design unveiled. Feb. 18, 2014 Mexico City Aztecs design unveiled. Feb. 25, 2014 Lincoln Zephyrs design unveiled. March 4, 2014 Fremont Trolls (Seattle) design unveiled. March 11, 2014 Kentucky Mashers design unveiled. March 18, 2014 Memphis Kings design unveiled. March 25, 2014 Toronto Tops design unveiled. April 1, 2014 New York Griffins design unveiled. Thanks for watching! We are still in the recruiting phase, so team names and branding are down the road a bit, but to kick us off... The History of the CFA, part 1: A League Unto Itself The History of the Continental Gridiron Alliance, part 1: The Continental Football Conference On January 25, 1987, the Continental Gridiron Alliance was officially chartered as the Continental Football Conference. The announcement came a day later in New Orleans in an attempt to take advantage of the media coverage of Super Bowl XX and show that the league was serious about directly competing with the NFL. After the collapse of the USFL the previous year and in anticipation of the expiration of the 1982 NFL CBA, the league was formed as a direct competitor to the NFL with an eye on eventually merging with the older league. When the announcement of the league’s formation, meant to be an event seen around the world during Super Bowl coverage, the CFC was almost entirely ignored, as the excitement surrounding Super Bowl XX and the lingering disappointment in the USFL combined into media apathy for the new league. As the owners left for their home cities and the auspicious announcement stage was torn down and packed up, the NFL’s Chicago Bears defeated the New England Patriots 46-10. It would be the last Super Bowl for more than two years, as the 1987-88 NFL season was cancelled after seven games played by non-union replacement players. Due to a combination of an expired collective bargaining agreement that lead to a labor strike, an unwillingness on the part of NFL players to cross the picket lines, in part itself because of the perceived disrespect of using replacement players, and the CFC’s willingness to negotiate with and sign star NFL players, the CFC quickly built itself as a money-losing but legitimate competitor to the NFL during the 1987-88 season. The CFC became the CFA on April 24, 1993 after merger negotiations broke down with the NFL. As evidenced by its original name, the league was intended as a third conference for the NFL and owners were confident that such a merger would come quickly once it was clear they were willing to lose money in the short term in order to compete with the NFL. With the perfect storm of the strike, the replacements, and the deep pockets of the CFC owners, respectability and competition came quickly for the league. This first major break for the league came in week 4 of the 1987 season, as CBS began airing NFL games on tape delay in a negotiation tactic. CBS claimed that the ratings for the replacement games were so low that the NFL owed restitution due to language in the broadcast contract. By week 6, CBS had negotiated a low-value but highly publicized one-year deal with the CFC to air CFC games in the time slots usually occupied by NFL games. Meant to be a negotiating tactic against the NFL, ratings were soon high enough for CFC games, featuring former NFL stars such as John Elway, Joe Montana, and Lawrence Taylor, that the contract was extended through the next season at a 300% increase, with CFC games planned to be aired that next season on Sunday evenings after the day’s NFL games. When the NFL’s week 7 games were aired on CBS at as late as 3 a.m. Monday morning in East Coast markets and it became clear that a lengthy legal struggle with the network would be extremely costly and that the striking players would not return to work without a new CBA, the NFL cancelled the rest of its season. Shots were truly fired by the CFC when CFC teams managed to sign 6 of the top 10 NFL draft picks from the 1991 draft class, though the CFC had mostly depended on signing away free agent veteran talent from the NFL to that point. The “leftovers league” reputation that had been building over several years for the CFC was subverted and negotiations immediately began in earnest between the NFL and CFC for a joint draft in order to prevent a repeat of the 1991 situation. However, the NFL’s draconian requirements for the CFC teams, such as an “admission fee” paid to the NFL and the loss of first round picks for CFC teams for the first two years of the joint draft led to the CFC rejecting the agreement for the 1992 draft. The CFC would sign 9 of the top 10 NFL draftees. When another year’s worth of negotiations for a joint draft once again broke down ahead of the 1993 draft — the NFL had lifted many of its requirements but refused to even broach the subject of a merger, despite the CFC championship game slightly outdrawing the AFC and NFC championships — the CFC abandoned the idea of merging with the NFL and rebranded itself as the Continental Gridiron Alliance with the slogan “A League Unto Itself.”