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Found 7 results

  1. In an alternate timeline where the National Football League never came to fruition, the American Football League (creative, I know) became the premier professional football league in the United States. Founded after World War II, in 1946, the AFL was formed from the remnants of the Midwest Professional Football League and the Eastern Football Association. Spearheaded by the Chicago Lions owner, Rupert T. Anderson, the AFL originally consisted of eight teams spread throughout the Midwest and Eastern seaboard and added two more teams, to bring the league to 10 members in 1948. Initially, the AFL struggled, but in 1950, attendance began to pick up as football fans realized that the AFL was playing quality football and the League took off, going on to expand 9 more times until 2002, when it reached its current state of 32 teams. Unlike the NFL, in our reality, the AFL does not have conferences. Instead, the league consists of 8 divisions: East, West, North, South, Pacific, Great Lakes, Atlantic, and Central. Each division has four member teams, which allows the 16 game schedule to break down like this: 6 division games (2 against each team) 4 games vs another division (yearly rotation) 6 games vs one team in remaining divisions (yearly rotation) The playoffs are an 8 team tournament consisting of division winners, culminating in the American Bowl (once again, very creative). Playoff teams are seeded 1-8 based on overall record, head-to-head, and playoff points (sum of opponents wins), as a tiebreaker. Now that I have gotten through some basic background of the league, let's move on to the meat of the project, the teams themselves. As far as uniform standards go, the rules are very similar to the NFL. One alternate or throwback uniform is allowed to be worn one time during the course of the regular season, but never in the post season. No manufacturer's mark is allowed on the uniform either, but the league does have a single uniform supplier, Apex Athletics, this Alternate Universe's equivalent to Nike or Adidas. The first division that I'll be presenting is the Great Lakes Division, home to three of the oldest teams in the American Football League. The Chicago Lions are one of the Charter members of the AFL and have been one of the most historically successful teams in the league. Having fallen upon hard times in recent years, the one bright spot in recent memory for Lions fans has been Randall Walker, perennial All-Pro running back and future Hall of Famer. The uniforms are a classic design in classic colors and have remained essentially unchanged for over 50 years, aside from an update to the logo in 2007. The Lions don't wear an alternate uniform and wear only one pair of pants. Another Charter member of the AFL, The Detroit Panthers derive their team logo and colors from the automotive industry. The Panthers sport a rather traditional uniform with simple striping and no embellishment. The Milwaukee Chiefs wear black and orange and are represented by a Native American Indian chief on their helmet and a drum logo on the sleeves. the uniform features a consistent, traditional striping pattern across all elements and colors. The alternate uniform is a throwback to the uniforms the team wore in its early years with legendary Head Coach, Chip Hansen. Todd Wolters is the Chiefs' star veteran quarterback who lead the team to American Bowl Championships in 2009 and 2011. The Minnesota Bruins are the youngest of the teams in the Great Lakes Division, being established in 1977. The team recently removed its northwester stripe from the sleeves and added their iconic bear paw logo to the sleeves. Mark Denton is the Bruins star Middle Linebacker, one of the more popular players in the league, known for his mullet haircut and extensive use of eye-black. Well, Tha'ts it for the Great Lakes Division. Thanks for taking a look and I am really looking forward to seeing what everyone has to say. Any and all comments would be greatly appreciated. Thanks again.
  2. Back in January I started my alternate universe of soccer, where soccer is the only major sport in the world. Here is the page to see all of the rules and past designs: So I recently began work on the 2017-18 Premier League season. All 20 teams are done and so are some other things(I'll get to that later). For now I will just be posting concepts. I start with the league logo(Unchanged): Special thanks to @TheHealthiestScratch for this Photoshop version of my hand drawn logo.
  3. NBA Rebrand/Alternate Universe

    For a while, i've been thinking about changing the NBA, because I wish that the Kings were still in Kansas City. So, I decided to make that concept, and more, editing NBA teams designs and cities, to make things make more sense and be sunshine, lollipops and rainbows in my brian. This means that the NBA will have a total of 32 teams, where some teams (like the one coming up soon) will either not move out of the city they moved out of, move to a different city or be born through the magics of expansion. Starting these changes, we have the San Diego (normally the Los Angeles) Clippers. HOME UNIFORM AWAY UNIFORM critique is appreciated
  4. Well guys, I have decided to do an alternate universe on the CFL. Well, you know how from 1993-1995 when the CFL had American teams? Well, in this alternate universe, we keep the American teams and see what happens. CFL in Atlantic Canada? Miami Manatees? Virginia Pirates? HARTFORD? All those questions will be answered in this AU. We will start with the 1996 season. Some helmet pictures credit to MG at mghelmets.com and helmet template credit to Thornbird.
  5. MLB Alternate Universe

    A little over a year ago, I made a concept of the modern day Philadelphia Athletics. In the thread, I mentioned I wanted to do a series of an "alternate universe" featuring teams who had stayed instead of moves (Or moved instead of stayed). Unlike some alternate universe threads, I'm not going to follow my own alternate universe ideas, just ideas for teams who may have relocated (Or not relocated) Included as a teaser before I get very into this is the home uniform for the 1980s Tampa White Sox. The Tampa area was a much-rumored spot for relocation throughout the late 80s. The White Sox were one of the rumored teams.
  6. WHAT IF the A's Never Left Philadelphia?

    Just a concept I whipped up a short while ago. What if the Athletics never packed their bags from the City of Brotherly Love? After all, they had a much more storied history in the city while the Phillies were always relegated to second-division status (Of course, financial problems and the Phillies new-found success did the A's in for their stay in Philly). So here's a concept for the 2014 Philly A's. Their home jerseys stay basically the same as they did for most of their existence, though they keep the gold from the 1950 Golden Anniversary uniforms. For the road jerseys I used a Philadelphia script I found on the internet, though I would love to one day be able to replicate the actual Athletics script into the word Philadelphia. The alternate uses the script that the team used in the late 80s, before the second serif was added. Let me know what you think, I might do one of those "alternate universe" threads where the A's stay and the Phillies move to another city, much like the A's did.
  7. I am designing an alternate universe league, complete with a history and team names, logos, uniforms, the whole shebang. I will essentially operate as the design company for the league, working with the owners to design the teams. Like a real-life league, most decisions will be partially up to the owner and partially up to the league. For example, each owner will pick a city, but the league will vote among 4 owner-provided options for nicknames. Owner picks team colors, pending league approval. Etc. It will be 2 leagues of 8-12 teams each with a week 16 championship game between the two league winners. I’m currently building a website for the league through which everyone can follow along, and this thread will contain all the history and designs, updated as they are created. I’m likely going to add people in waves. The league will start with 8 owners and expand from there over the course of the off season. NEWS: Scheduled unveilings: Feb. 11, 2014 Denver Drillers design unveiled. Feb. 18, 2014 Mexico City Aztecs design unveiled. Feb. 25, 2014 Lincoln Zephyrs design unveiled. March 4, 2014 Fremont Trolls (Seattle) design unveiled. March 11, 2014 Kentucky Mashers design unveiled. March 18, 2014 Memphis Kings design unveiled. March 25, 2014 Toronto Tops design unveiled. April 1, 2014 New York Griffins design unveiled. Thanks for watching! We are still in the recruiting phase, so team names and branding are down the road a bit, but to kick us off... The History of the CFA, part 1: A League Unto Itself The History of the Continental Gridiron Alliance, part 1: The Continental Football Conference On January 25, 1987, the Continental Gridiron Alliance was officially chartered as the Continental Football Conference. The announcement came a day later in New Orleans in an attempt to take advantage of the media coverage of Super Bowl XX and show that the league was serious about directly competing with the NFL. After the collapse of the USFL the previous year and in anticipation of the expiration of the 1982 NFL CBA, the league was formed as a direct competitor to the NFL with an eye on eventually merging with the older league. When the announcement of the league’s formation, meant to be an event seen around the world during Super Bowl coverage, the CFC was almost entirely ignored, as the excitement surrounding Super Bowl XX and the lingering disappointment in the USFL combined into media apathy for the new league. As the owners left for their home cities and the auspicious announcement stage was torn down and packed up, the NFL’s Chicago Bears defeated the New England Patriots 46-10. It would be the last Super Bowl for more than two years, as the 1987-88 NFL season was cancelled after seven games played by non-union replacement players. Due to a combination of an expired collective bargaining agreement that lead to a labor strike, an unwillingness on the part of NFL players to cross the picket lines, in part itself because of the perceived disrespect of using replacement players, and the CFC’s willingness to negotiate with and sign star NFL players, the CFC quickly built itself as a money-losing but legitimate competitor to the NFL during the 1987-88 season. The CFC became the CFA on April 24, 1993 after merger negotiations broke down with the NFL. As evidenced by its original name, the league was intended as a third conference for the NFL and owners were confident that such a merger would come quickly once it was clear they were willing to lose money in the short term in order to compete with the NFL. With the perfect storm of the strike, the replacements, and the deep pockets of the CFC owners, respectability and competition came quickly for the league. This first major break for the league came in week 4 of the 1987 season, as CBS began airing NFL games on tape delay in a negotiation tactic. CBS claimed that the ratings for the replacement games were so low that the NFL owed restitution due to language in the broadcast contract. By week 6, CBS had negotiated a low-value but highly publicized one-year deal with the CFC to air CFC games in the time slots usually occupied by NFL games. Meant to be a negotiating tactic against the NFL, ratings were soon high enough for CFC games, featuring former NFL stars such as John Elway, Joe Montana, and Lawrence Taylor, that the contract was extended through the next season at a 300% increase, with CFC games planned to be aired that next season on Sunday evenings after the day’s NFL games. When the NFL’s week 7 games were aired on CBS at as late as 3 a.m. Monday morning in East Coast markets and it became clear that a lengthy legal struggle with the network would be extremely costly and that the striking players would not return to work without a new CBA, the NFL cancelled the rest of its season. Shots were truly fired by the CFC when CFC teams managed to sign 6 of the top 10 NFL draft picks from the 1991 draft class, though the CFC had mostly depended on signing away free agent veteran talent from the NFL to that point. The “leftovers league” reputation that had been building over several years for the CFC was subverted and negotiations immediately began in earnest between the NFL and CFC for a joint draft in order to prevent a repeat of the 1991 situation. However, the NFL’s draconian requirements for the CFC teams, such as an “admission fee” paid to the NFL and the loss of first round picks for CFC teams for the first two years of the joint draft led to the CFC rejecting the agreement for the 1992 draft. The CFC would sign 9 of the top 10 NFL draftees. When another year’s worth of negotiations for a joint draft once again broke down ahead of the 1993 draft — the NFL had lifted many of its requirements but refused to even broach the subject of a merger, despite the CFC championship game slightly outdrawing the AFC and NFC championships — the CFC abandoned the idea of merging with the NFL and rebranded itself as the Continental Gridiron Alliance with the slogan “A League Unto Itself.”