hawkfan89

Professional Hockey League; A Fictional History: 1995 Off-Season

2,380 posts in this topic

I use a site called random.org. basically I assign each team with a rating from 1-5 based on a number of factors such as their success the previous year, the age of the players, etc. I enter each team into a list as many times as corresponds with their rating, for example, if Boston is rated 4, and Hamilton is rated 2, to determine the standings, I enter Boston 4 times, Hamilton twice etc. The standings are determined according to who appears first on the resulting randomized list. In the playoffs, I go series by series, entering each team in a particular series 4 times (in a best-of-seven) with one extra for the team with home ice advantage. If there is a rating difference greater than 2 points between two playoff teams, the higher rated team gets another entry. In a best of seven, the first team to appear 4 times wins the series.

After all this randomization, I add my own narrative to it. I make up any injuries, suspensions, breakout seasons etc depending on the results of the season.

Hopefully this make some sense to some people, or at least it explains that there is a process behind it. I'm still trying to make the system work better. Essentially I run this in a somewhat similar way to Veras' AFA simulation football league.

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I use a site called random.org. basically I assign each team with a rating from 1-5 based on a number of factors such as their success the previous year, the age of the players, etc. I enter each team into a list as many times as corresponds with their rating, for example, if Boston is rated 4, and Hamilton is rated 2, to determine the standings, I enter Boston 4 times, Hamilton twice etc. The standings are determined according to who appears first on the resulting randomized list. In the playoffs, I go series by series, entering each team in a particular series 4 times (in a best-of-seven) with one extra for the team with home ice advantage. If there is a rating difference greater than 2 points between two playoff teams, the higher rated team gets another entry. In a best of seven, the first team to appear 4 times wins the series.

After all this randomization, I add my own narrative to it. I make up any injuries, suspensions, breakout seasons etc depending on the results of the season.

Hopefully this make some sense to some people, or at least it explains that there is a process behind it. I'm still trying to make the system work better. Essentially I run this in a somewhat similar way to Veras' AFA simulation football league.

That is actually genius...

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First of all, I love what you have so far, and I'm looking forward to watching this unfold.

We do need someone to start a Baseball or Basketball one now ;)

I've been trying to figure out a solid simulation system for a baseball league, though I doubt that I would launch my league before I finish the AFA.

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Sorry for the delay, here's 1947-48:

1947-48_2.png

Logo & Uniform Changes:

  • Vancouver drops their orange alternate sweater.
  • New York simplifies the arm striping on their blue sweater and adds the players' numbers to the front of both jerseys, right below the wordmark.

Standings:

Canadian Division:

  1. Montreal
  2. Buffalo
  3. Toronto
  4. Edmonton
  5. Hamilton

American Division

  1. Chicago
  2. Boston
  3. Philadelphia
  4. New York
  5. Detroit

Season Summary:

The 1947-48 season was a bizzare one for several teams. The Hamilton Kings appeared to run out of gas after their big run the previous year. Star players Frankie Jenkins and Ted Nixon were both injured early in the season and frustrated 18-year veteran Gilbert Wriggly retired in January, 1948. As a result, the Kings fell to a last place finish in the Canadian Division. Meanwhile, the Montreal Royale, spurred by young phenom Pierre Drouin, climbed all the way from the basement back to first place. In the American Division, Detroit fell to last place, while the Philadelphia Redshirts, still clinging to life as a franchise, overcame their financial problems and rumors about their future to finish in third place and back in the playoffs for the first time since 1944.
In the playoffs, Montreal dominated Vancouver and Buffalo, not allowing a goal until game 2 against Buffalo. They would face the Chicago Shamrocks in the Lewis Cup final, where the Shamrocks would sweep them in 4 straight to capture their second cup. Early in the summer of 1948, Milt Stevenson anounced he had struck a deal to sell the Redshirts to a wealthy Quebec City businessman named Jean Poulette. The team would be called the Quebec Nationale. The deal fell through, however, when the Poulette couldn't come up with the down payment in time. The Redshirts would stay in Philly for at least one more year.

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Not sure what went wrong with that last post but I can't seem to fix it from my phone. I'll try to fix it later when I'm at my computer.

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1948-49:

1948-49.png

Logo & Uniform Changes:

  • The Hamilton Kings update their logo and adjust the striping on both sweaters
  • Buffalo reverses the trim colours on their white jersey.

Standings:

Canadian Division

  1. Montreal
  2. Buffalo
  3. Vancouver
  4. Hamilton
  5. Toronto

American Division

  1. Boston
  2. Philadelphia
  3. Chicago
  4. Detroit
  5. New York

Season Summary:

The biggest story entering the 1948-49 season was the situations in Philadelphia and Vancouver. Milt Stevenson had been unable to sell the Redshirts during the off-season and by January, 1949 the team had lost so much money they could not meet payroll. It appeared that after 46 seasons in three different leagues, the Redshirts were finished, until veteren, defenseman Tom Lapin led the players and staff in a vote where they decided to play for free for the remainder of the season to give the franchise a chance to survive. "We loved Philly and we loved the game, that's why we did it." said a 90-year-old Lapin in 2010. "It was different back then, now it's all about money." The Redshirts not only survived the season, they won their final 14 games in a row to finish second in the American Division. Meanwhile in Vancouver, the Bighorns enjoyed their best season yet, finishing third in the Canadian Division. However, the travel expenses as well as the lack of interest at times from a fan base used to watching local junior hockey began to take a toll on the extremely isolated franchise. In New York, Skippy Cleveland suffered a horrific injury in November when he slid into the boards head-first. Cleveland fought for his life for 6 weeks before finally coming out of the coma in late December. He missed the rest of the season and the Civics slipped to last place in the American Division.
In the playoffs, Buffalo finally caught fire, sweeping the Vancouver Bighorns in 4 straight before winning a classic battle with the Royale in 7 games to advance to the Lewis Cup finals. Boston defeated Philadelphia in a nasty 6-game series that saw a lot of fights including a brawl in game 4, while Chicago defeated Detroit in 5 games. After a tough 7-game series with the Bulldogs, the Chicago Shamrocks advanced to their second consecutive Lewis Cup final. Buffalo goaltender James Whyte turned in a couragous performance in the finals despite suffering from severe abdominal pain, including a 64-save shutout to claim the Lewis Cup in game 6. Buffalo finally won a big-league championship but it would come at a price. Less than two weeks after game six, James Whyte died of a liver infection at his home in Fredricton, New Brunswick. The league created the Whyte Trophy in his honour to be awarded to the league's top goaltender every year. In Philadelphia, a dramatic 3 years off the ice finally came to an end when a local Millionaire, Bob Wells, offered to purchase the team and keep it in Philadelphia. The Redshirts were saved, but Vancouver would not be so lucky. In June, 1949, Bighorns owner Gerald Smythe anounced both he and the team were bankrupt. The team was forced to fold, leaving the league at 9 teams.

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The Toronto Racers entered the 1950s with a completely new look. Owner Art Harris wanted to give the team a modern update after using the stylized "R" logo since the team's inception in the late 1920s. The Racers introduced their new logo, a classic steering wheel with an updated "R" at the center, at the start of the 1949-50 season, with different colour schemes for home/away. C&c is appreciated, uniforms will be posted with the 1949-50 season summary.

Update: Here is the final logo for the 1949-50 season. Thanks everybody for the comments, more rebrands will be coming in the early '50s.

Toronto_2.png

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I think that looks a little too modern

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I like the direction that you're headed, but, in my opinion you'll need a few tweaks before is ready to go.

First, I think the steering wheel itself looks too modern. As far as I can tell, racing steering wheels at that time were much lighter and less... mechanical, for lack of a better word. Look at this GIF to see what I mean.

If you're set on the two-tone blue, I would go with navy and a lighter shade to get better contrast.

Finally, I would also use a different tool to arch the text. I'm not sure what program you're using, but if it's illustrator, you'll get better results by placing the text on an curved line than by using the warp tool.

Keep up the good work.

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Thanks for the feedback guys, I think I'm going to end up putting off the rebrand for a few seasons. I'm just wondering what do you guys think of the steering wheel concept in general? I like it personally and I think this will ultimately be the Racers' look but I feel like maybe I'm introducing the whole idea about a decade too early. What do you guys think?

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I like the idea of having a steering wheel at the center of the identity, but agree that it might be a bit early. I think you can definitely make it work for the 1950s with some modifications, especially changing the shape of the wheel and dropping the second shade of blue.

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Ok, one last attempt at the wheel. this time I thinned the wheel itself a little bit, fixed the text, and went with a monochrome look. I think it's a little better for it's time, what do you guys think? I really agree about the two tone blue, that will likely be this team's colour scheme eventually, similar to the CFL's Toronto Argonauts, but I think it looks more appropriate for this era with only the light blue.

Toronto_2.png

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1949-50:

Season Summary:

The 1949-50 season was a historic one for the PHL. It began when the Boston Bulldogs recruited the first African-American player, Tommy Cooper. Cooper got off to a huge start, scoring 41 goals. Meanwhile, in Buffalo, forward Johnny Williams became the first player to play in four different decades, completing a pro career that had begun in 1929. New York Civics star Skippy Cleveland returned to the lineup in December, helping the Civics to a third place finish in the American Division. The Buffalo Bulls, despite the tragic loss of goaltender James Whyte, finished first overall in the league thanks to an inspired performance from rookie goalie Billy Watson. Toronto had their worst season yet, finishing last overall with a 9-39-2 record.

In the playoffs, Buffalo defeated Detroit and Hamilton while Boston took out New York and Chicago before the two met in the Lewis Cup finals. The two teams alternated wins in the first four games before Buffalo took the series in six games to claim their second straight Lewis Cup.

Team Standings:

Canadian Division

  1. Buffalo
  2. Hamilton
  3. Montreal
  4. Toronto

American Division

  1. Boston
  2. Chicago
  3. Philadelphia
  4. New York
  5. Detroit

Uniform%20Template45.png

Logo & Uniform Changes:

  • The Toronto Racers make significant changes to their brand, introducing a new logo featuring a steering wheel as well as slight changes to their uniform striping.

Season Highlights:

  • October 9, 1949, Tommy Cooper becomes the first black player in PHL history, scoring two goals in his first game.
  • January 2, 1950, Johnny Williams becomes the first player to play pro hockey in four decades.
  • Game 1 of the Lewis Cup becomes the first-ever PHL game to be broadcast on national TV, Buffalo wins 4-2

TV1.png

I am really curious to hear what you guys think of this TV template. I plan on using it for all season highlights and all playoff games in the future if it gets good feedback. And yes, starting around the late 60s, it will be in colour and the TV itself will be updated every few years.

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Its an interesting concept for that TV template, I like it.

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Thanks! I'm still trying to figure out the best way to present it, particularly the playoffs. I may hold off on showing full playoff series until 1951-52. The '50s will be an eventful decade, lots of rebrands coming up!

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Curious how are you gonna handle mass expansions, are you gonna do something like Veras' Expansion Councils?

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I have thought about doing an expansion counsel, honestly I'm not quite sure if I have enough of a following yet to create one, but the first mass expansion won't be until probably about the late 60s, similar to the NHL, so we'll see how it looks then. For the most part I have a lot of the teams planned out but I will be looking for input on some of them. The 1950s will be mostly about presentation and rebranding the existing teams into what will in most cases be their permanent identity, although there will be at least one expansion team coming very soon. Things will start to get very interesting as far as expansion is concerned in the 1960s.

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In 1950 it was the New York Civics' turn to rebrand, any feedback would be appreciated.

nyc2.png

1950.png

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