hawkfan89

Professional Hockey League; A Fictional History: 1995 Off-Season

2,380 posts in this topic

Will we see an Ottawa franchise!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?

Also 100th REPLY WOO!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have something to ask you guys, for those of you who follow this league, what do you enjoy the most? The logo designs? The seasons? The narratives? I'm just asking because the next few seasons will be somewhat uneventful logo & uniform-wise. I'm considering accelerating the process by condensing the next 3-4 seasons into one or two posts, maybe with one narrative for those seasons and maybe one classic game per season until we have more activity such as expansion, rebranding, etc.

Of course once we get to the 70s, 80s, and especially the 90s each season will be more interesting but I'm just wondering if it feels slow right now.

Any thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I personally like seeing the narrative of the seasons and the whole playoffs. So if it would make sense to skip along to the end of the decade to keep tempo so to speak.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer the narratives, and have no problem with seasons as two separate posts, even when no designs changed in between.

For what it's worth, I bunched seasons together on occasion in the AFA early in the process for the exact same reason, and I wish I hadn't. Doing so requires you to shorten them and leave out detail to avoid crossing into tldr territory. I think the storytelling side is what makes these projects fun, while the designs bring it to life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have something to ask you guys, for those of you who follow this league, what do you enjoy the most? The logo designs? The seasons? The narratives? I'm just asking because the next few seasons will be somewhat uneventful logo & uniform-wise. I'm considering accelerating the process by condensing the next 3-4 seasons into one or two posts, maybe with one narrative for those seasons and maybe one classic game per season until we have more activity such as expansion, rebranding, etc.

Of course once we get to the 70s, 80s, and especially the 90s each season will be more interesting but I'm just wondering if it feels slow right now.

Any thoughts?

I enjoy the seasons and narratives the most. Like Veras said, I'm big into the storytelling. But take your time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I appreciate the feedback guys, I'm going to stay the course with the seasons, I don't want the quality of this project to suffer and it seems like most of you are enjoying them. I'm hoping to have 1955-56 posted sometime tonight so look out for that, I've already got the results and it's interesting. Thanks again for the input everyone!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1955-56:

Season Summary:

The New York Civics continued to make headlines during the 1955 off-season. Shortly after the 1955 playoffs ended, the Civics approached Boston Bulldogs coach/general manager James Simmons with an enormous offer of $30,000. Simmons jumped at the offer and immediately took the reins of the Civics. The Bulldogs were furious and swore revenge on their hated rivals for pouching the architect behind their dynasty. The Civics weren't finished there. In June, they recruited highly touted prospect Dave Riley, a kid from western Michigan projected to be the first American-born star in the PHL. Immediately, the Detroit Mustangs protested, claiming that they had the rights to all Michigan-born players. The league ruled in favour of the Civics, however, as Riley was already 18 and eligible for free agency, according to the pre-draft PHL rules at that time. Both additions paid immediate dividends for New York, as Riley, combined with established star Skippy Cleveland, made the Civics the most dangerous offensive team in hockey while 11-year veteran Red O'Ryan played more minutes on defense than anyone in league history as the Civics ran away with first place overall. Meanwhile, the Bulldogs never missed a beat after losing their coach, finishing second with Don Loach scoring 43 goals, the most ever in a PHL season to date. In Philadelphia, defenseman Tom Lapin had anounced before the start of the year that he would retire at season's end. When it appeared that the Redshirts would once again miss the playoffs, they dealt him to Montreal in exchange for young star Jean Lerouix. Lapin would lead the Royale to a first-place finish in the Canadian Division.

The Royale started their first round series strong against Quebec, jumping to a 2-0 series lead, before Quebec stormed back with four straight victories to complete the upset. The Civics ran into all sorts of adversity, coming back from two consecutive 2-0 series deficits in two consecutive 7-game series to reach the finals for the first time in 10 years. In the Canadian Division the Quebec Nationale continued their impressive run pulling off what would be the biggest upset in PHL history over the Hamilton Kings. In the finals, New York jumped to a 2-0 lead before Quebec won the next three straight. Facing elimination in game 6, the Civics nursed a 1-0 lead before erupting for 7 goals in the third period in an 8-1 victory. In game 7, Dave Riley and Skippy Cleveland each scored two goals as the New York Civics won their first-ever Lewis Cup.

Standings:

Canadian Division

  1. Montreal
  2. Hamilton
  3. Toronto
  4. Quebec
  5. Buffalo

American Division

  1. New York
  2. Boston
  3. Detroit
  4. Chicago
  5. Philadelphia

1955-56.png

Classic Games:

56classics.png

Playoff Tree:

56playoffs.png

56champs.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*growl noises* Curse you New York...great I'm turning back to my typical anti New York,self.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been following this for a while and let me say,this is a child of Veras' AFA.Perfect work.

As for the expansion,do what Veras does and let members create their own people and backstories and a Expansion Council.

Keep on with the good work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This has quickly excelled into one of my favorite concept series

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys, I'm having a lot of fun with this project and I'm glad you guys are enjoying it too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1956-57:

Season Summary:

The Toronto Racers continued their rebuild in the summer of 1956, recruiting 17-year old Mark Benson. Benson led the Ontario junior league with 53 goals and was predicted to be a future superstar. In his first season with the Racers, Benson became the second player in history to score 50 goals in a season. Despite Benson's efforts, the Racers fell to 4th place thanks in part to a late-season injury to David Stairs. In the American Division, the Civics continued their domination, losing only 6 games all season. just days after Mark Benson scored his 50th of the season, Skippy Cleveland became the 3rd player in PHL history to score 50 goals in a season. A new concept was introduced in February, the PHL All-Star Game. The Canadian Division All-Stars took on the American Division All-Stars in NewYork. The American Division took the game 6-4 with Dave Riley scoring a hat-trick.

As the playoffs began, Toronto dropped three straight to Buffalo before winning the next four to take the series. They continued their hot streak in the Canadian Division finals, sweeping Quebec to reach the Lewis Cup final for the first time since 1942. In the American Division, the Boston Bulldogs gave New York all the could handle before the Civics won game 7 in overtime thanks to a goal by defenseman Red O'Ryan. the Civics would face the Detroit Mustangs in the American Division final. The Mustangs had pulled off an upset of their own, taking down the Chicago Shamrocks in five games. Detroit would also take the Civics to a full seven games before running out of gas in game 7 as New York won in a 8-0 blowout. In the finals, the Racers managed to skate with the Civics for all seven games before Skippy Cleveland and Bearnie Bassen each scored two in game seven to give the Civics a 2-0 win and their second straight Lewis Cup.

Standings:

Canadian Division

  1. Buffalo
  2. Montreal
  3. Quebec
  4. Toronto
  5. Hamilton

American Division

  1. New York
  2. Chicago
  3. Detroit
  4. Boston
  5. Philadelphia

Logo & Uniform Changes:

57changes.png

57changes2.png

  • The Toronto Racers update their uniforms, adding navy blue to their colour scheme.
  • The league holds it's first-ever annual All-Star Game, between the Canadian Division All-Stars and the American Division All-Stars.

Uniforms:

1956-57.png

Classic Games:

57classics.png

Playoff Tree:

57playoffs.png

57champs.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Curse you New York *shakes fist*

I do like the All-star Uniforms, a little crude but that's just being the first one ever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's interesting to see the Civics finally have success with their star-studded lineup. I have a feeling Boston will be back soon though, they have some young talent in their system. And the All-Star unis will get a lot more interesting, that's where I'll eventually do a lot of experimenting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the summer of 1957, the PHL began to look into expansion. Ideally, two more Canadian franchises would be added by 1960 in order to balance out the divisions. potential owners in Ottawa and Halifax Immediately expressed interest. Toronto and Montreal both expressed interest in second franchises. The league took a poll among owners and fans to figure out which cities should be awarded new teams.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure about Ottawa, but I think Halifax should be called the Claymores.

How soon can we expect expansion/relocation teams out west?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Everybody for the feedback on expansion. an announcement concerning cities will probably be made at some point during the 1958 off-season.

In the meantime, here's 1957-58:

Season Summary:

George Allen never told anyone that he planned to retire after 21 seasons at the end of the 1956-57 season. He had planned all along to anounce his retirement during the Lewis Cup celebration if the Mustangs managed to win. Ultimately, the Mustangs lost to Allen's longtime former team, the New York Civics, in game 7 of the American Division final. During the off-season, the Mustangs, who were trying to get younger, released Allen, who then retired, but he was still hungry to win his first Lewis Cup. In December, Allen anounced he would return to the game, this time with his former hated rivals, the Boston Bulldogs. The Bulldogs were struggling in last place and desperately needed a boost. Allen's presence lifted Boston into 4th place, good enough for a playoff spot, George Allen would have one more shot at hockey's biggest prize. Meanwhile, Detroit greatly regretted cutting Allen, as an injury to star forward Any Reid in November caused the team to plummet to last place. In Toronto, the heartbreak of 1957 quickly faded as the Racers dominated the regular season. David Stairs and Mark Benson tore up the scoring race, finishing 1st and 2nd respectively.

Toronto continued to dominate in the playoffs, taking out arch-rivals Hamilton in 6 before defeating the Montreal Royale to advance to the Lewis Cup finals for the second consecutive season. In Boston, the Bulldogs finally avenged New York's pouching of their former coach, James Simmons, as well as the playoff losses to the Civics the previous two seasons with an emotional game 7 victory to end a very hate-filled series between the two rivals. George Allen also got his revenge over his former team in game 5, scoring a hat-trick. In the division final against Philadelphia, the Bulldogs looked like a team destined for their 6th championship. However, the Redshirts managed to come from behind twice in a row in games 6 and 7 to stun the Bulldogs and advance to the Lewis Cup finals to face the Racers. George Allen, arguably the greatest player in PHL history, would retire having never hoisted the Lewis Cup. In the finals, The Redshirt fans chanted "nine-teen fort-y" at the Racers in all three games in Philadelphia, as the Racers had not won since the league's inaugral season in 1940. The Racers would have the last laugh, however, winning the series in 7 games to claim their second league championship and their first Lewis Cup.

Standings:

Canadian Division:

  1. Toronto
  2. Montreal
  3. Quebec
  4. Hamilton
  5. Buffalo

American Division

  1. New York
  2. Philadelphia
  3. Chicago
  4. Boston
  5. Detroit

Logo & Uniform Changes:

58changes.png

The All-Star uniforms are updated to include stars on the front.

Uniforms:

58unis.png

Classic Games:

58classics.png

Playoff Tree:

58playoffs.png

58champs.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now