hawkfan89

Professional Hockey League; A Fictional History: 2004-05 Regular Season

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18 hours ago, Jbadger9 said:

I would like to see Chicago rework. Haven't they had the same logo since the start? There isn't much to rework with a shamrock though

 

They've had close to the same logo from the beginning. The original from '39 was a slightly different shape. Chicago is probably the most unlikely to change anything on the green jerseys for sure, I have been contemplating removing "Chicago" from the white jersey above the logo. Probably not until the next template redesign though, which will be about 5-ish seasons from now.

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4 minutes ago, Darknes said:

What's the feel on Anderssen? 

Solid offensive defenseman. Boston management has suggested he could be the second coming of Jari Pukki, but with a little more grit. 

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41 minutes ago, Cardsblues02 said:

Are we allowed to start voting for expansion? If so, any guidelines that we should know about? 

 

I'm almost finished with the guidelines and the expansion bids. Basically there will be guidelines listed first, then information on each bid including the prospective owner, arena plans, city population, etc. as well as pros and cons for each bid. I'm hoping to have it up by tomorrow and then we can start the voting.

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I thought the Choppers got a new arena by the time they moved to Milwaukee. Or maybe I'm just imagining things.

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Welcome everyone to the 1999 PHL Expansion Committee. The purpose of this committee is to select two new cities to join the PHL as expansion teams to begin play in October, 2001. Before we start, here are some basic guidelines.

 

·       First off I’m going to ask everyone to refrain from making up any current or former players, coaches, general managers, or owners from either the PHL or the GHL. If you would like your character to be any of these roles, I’d ask that you message me and I will suggest someone who either has not been mentioned yet or has very little written about them. The idea here is to maintain consistency and avoid conflicts in the narrative.

·       Although this project was heavily influenced by the AFA project, the PHL and AFA do not exist in the same universe. Please avoid overlap between the two leagues.

·       I will allow rumours because rumours are a part of sports. However, please do not post anything as fact that directly affects the PHL story. Please try to use some sort of disclaimer such as ‘‘there has been a rumour…‘‘.

·       Your character may or may not appear again in the narrative.

·       Your character should not be closely associated with any current or potential PHL franchise. The PHL would like this committee to be as un-biased as possible. There will be exceptions for characters such as players or local media members, however.

·       I would suggest making your character a relatively important person, i.e. a lawyer, politician, media member, etc.

·       Just to clarify something, real-life professional teams from hockey or other sports do not exist in this universe, nor do real-life venues. Real-life non-sports figures do exist for the most part as do real-life non-sports related events, such as World War II or 9-11.

·       This hasn’t really been a major issue yet but please try to make your character as era-appropriate as possible. This committee is meeting in 1999.

·       While I will welcome name suggestions, I do already have ideas for names and logos for most of these cities. However, there has been at least one instance where I scrapped my own idea for one that was suggested on the boards. That was the Nova Scotia Claymores. In that case, Claymores was 10 times better than what I had in mind so I ended up using it, so I do appreciate suggestions for names, even if I don’t always use them

·       Finally, when offering opinions on expansion, please stick to the cities listed.

 

 

Those are the basic guidelines. I’ll post more if any issues come up. For now, here are the main cities in the running for expansion with the pros and cons for each one. The two winning bids will be chosen by the commissioner from the top three voted cities.

 

*Population numbers are educated estimates and include entire metro areas.

 

 

1.      Houston

Population (1999): 4,600,000*

Fan Support: Strong

Owner: Bernie Cratt, an Oil Baron worth nearly $7 Billion. One of the wealthiest men in America who attempted to land a franchise for Houston in 1989.

Arena: TexCo Center, an 18,000 seat arena built in 1985. The home of Houston’s Professional Basketball League franchise, also owned by Cratt.

 

Pros: Houston has been trying for some time to land a franchise. Like Clint Love in Dallas, Cratt’s wealth alone is probably enough to support a team. That likely would not be necessary, however, as fans have shown a lot of excitement at the prospect of having a team of their own. The TexCo Center is still a relatively new building with all the facilities necessary for a PHL team.

 

Cons: Hockey has had a history of failure in Texas, with the Dallas Metros forced to relocate and the Dallas Desperados also struggling. This could be a red flag, especially since Houston – like Dallas - is a fairly crowded sports market with teams in all of the other three major sports leagues.

 

 

2.      Atlanta

 

Population (1999): 4,000,000

Fan Support: Strong

Owner: Joseph Cartwright, a Canadian multimillionaire living in Savannah, GA, who is determined to make hockey work in the region.

Arena: Team would play in the 18,000 seat Coastal Airlines Arena, constructed in 1994.

 

Pros: Atlanta may be the strongest bid the league has received. In 1989, the city was rejected largely due to suspicion that the potential ownership group was using the league to get a new arena for their basketball franchise. That group is no longer pursuing the franchise but the arena has been built and is waiting for a second tenant. Joseph Cartwright, who made his fortune in internet stocks, is a passionate hockey fan from Toronto who has promised to put everything into making an Atlanta franchise work. Atlanta is also one of the biggest TV markets in the United States, a hug attraction for the league.

 

Cons: Atlanta is another crowded market with competitive teams in Basketball, Football, and Baseball. The Baseball franchise won championships in 1997 and ’98. A hockey team may need to become a contender fairly quickly in order to hold the fans’ attention.

 

 

3.      Phoenix

 

Population (1999): 3,000,000*

Fan Support: Unknown

Owner: Bob Winkler, an Oakland-based entrepreneur worth about $90 Million who was born and raised in Vancouver and is a huge hockey fan. Winkler previously attempted to land a franchise for Oakland but was rejected in 1989. After the Nuggets announced their relocation to the city, Winkler focused his attention on Phoenix.

Arena: A 19,000-seat arena will be built by 2001. Team can play in a 14,000-seat arena in Tempe until construction is complete.

 

Pros: Phoenix is a strong bid. Winkler has proven his commitment to the game with his second expansion bid in a second city. The PHL has never had any presence in the desert so the team would be entering a territory all their own.

 

Cons: There are a lot of unknowns about Phoenix. The city is not a traditional hockey market and locals seem to have no real knowledge of the game whatsoever. Winkler has pointed to Miami’s success but even that is unproven.

 

 

 

4.      Tampa

 

Population (1999): 2,000,000*

Fan Support: Fair

Owner: Bay Athletics, an organization that owns Tampa’s Football, Baseball, and Soccer franchises.

Arena: Sun Arena, a 22,000-seat arena to be completed in late 1999.

 

Pros: Despite inconsistent performances on the ice, the Miami Stingrays have developed a surprisingly strong following, proving that hockey can work in Florida. Tampa may even be set up for even more success. The Sun Arena does not have a regular tenant at this point so the hockey franchise would have the building to themselves at least for now, and Bay Athletics has been committed to producing winning sports franchises for over 20 years.

 

Cons: Tampa is also pursuing a basketball expansion franchise and there is concern that it could distract the fanbase from hockey. The fans in the city have been notably more enthusiastic about the potential for basketball.

 

 

5.      Portland

 

Population (1999): 2,000,000*

Fan Support: Strong

Owner: Bruce Goble, a local millionaire worth about $60 Million.

Arena: Team would play in PacifiCo Center, slated to open in late 2000.

 

Pros: There is no question about Portland as a qualified hockey market. Portland fans are typically divided between California and Seattle but would love to have a team of their own. Previous concerns about a suitable arena have been addressed with a new building opening late next year.

 

Cons: Three teams already call the Pacific Northwest home and the market may be a bit crowded. The league would also gain little in the way of national prestige and TV revenue by expanding to Portland.

 

 

6.      Memphis

 

Population (1999): 1,000,000*

Fan Support: Fair

Owner: Harris Investments, a group of local entrepreneurs wanting to bring professional sports to Memphis.

Arena: City would need to approve 20,000-seat arena proposed by potential owners. No other suitable arena at this time.

 

Pros: Memphis is a completely untapped market in the sporting world. The hockey team would be the only professional team in the city and one of only two in the state. There has been a lot of excitement from the locals about the possibility of having a pro hockey team, even if they do not understand the game completely.

 

Cons: The entire bid will hinge on the city’s decision about the arena, which won’t be made until city council meetings in January, 2000. The league will have to decide if it wants to take the risk of awarding a franchise where there is no guaranteed place to play.

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Lawrence Russo is the youngest United States Senator, a 34-year-old Democrat from New Jersey. Russo is a lifelong hockey fan, his passion for the Long Island Concordes stretching back to the team's formation. His votes will be for Houston and Atlanta for similar reasons, those being the largest populations of any city with a bid, strong sports fanbases, and committed owners.

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Bert Metzger returns for his second go at the Expansion Council...as Metzger's Haus of German Fare has rode the wave of the family restaurant boom, it has expanded well past its Midwestern roots and become a national brand.  One thing which remains is its status as the place to be for hockey gamenight; as such, he is honored to select the following cities for his vote:

1. Portland, Oregon.  The Bighorns and Grey Wolves are VERY well-supported in their respective markets, so a Portland team with committed ownership and a sparkling new arena would be a MAJOR success.  In addition to being Oregon's team, it would also appeal to fans in far Northern California (beyond the Nuggets' base) and Southern Washington (those who can't bring themselves to support the Grey Wolves)

2. Atlanta, Georgia.  It would be a strong hub for the Southeast (between the Stingrays and Raiders), STRONG fan support and local ownership, and a good arena...it's too good of a bid to pass up.

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Derek Carpeta: Italian-American Buisnessman who is CEO of a local chain Restaurant from the Bronx. He is a proud Civics fan since birth (he's 35). Has been a season ticket holder for 10 years and has a new restaurant in the stadium. He's a man who is eager to voice his opinion on where the league should go.

 

Pick 1: Atlanta: it makes a lot of sense for there is a strong love of sports and whilst the team may have to be competitive right out the gate, it could truly win over the city and gain a cult following.

 

Pick 2: Memphis: Memphis is a risk but compared to Phoenix and Tampa it's safer than those two. Whilst yes there is no suitable arena at the moment if chosen they could easily secure one. Also being the areas first professional team it can lead to strong loyal fan base.

 

Tertiary Pick in case Memphis cannot secure an arena: Portland, its a very safe choice already has some hockey culture to being in the Pacific Northwest around Seattle and Vancouver whilst being significantly outside of the exclusive marketing zones of both cities.

 

*Bolded cities my choices, bolded, italicized, and underlined ones are my in case of lack of stadium choices.

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James Bailey is writer for the New York Times who covers sports (mainly hockey). He has a passion for hockey, playing as a child and being a lifelong Civics fan. Bailey's votes go to...

 

Houston

Houston seems to be a prefect place to have hockey. Sure, Dallas has had past failures, but Houston isn't Dallas! The fans will show, as they do with every other sporting event! 

 

Tampa

Although it is an exotic market, Tampa has shown interest in hockey. Its time to reward them. Floridaians have shown they can support hockey. Time to give Tampa a team. 

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Josephine “Josie” Olivia Bennett (née Graziani) was born on February 25, 1961 in Brooklyn, New York to Sal and Louise Graziani. Her father was the owner of Graziani’s, a family owned pizza chain that was popular throughout New York City, but was struggling to get national recognition. 

 

Despite her parents being huge sports fans, Josie would not get into hockey until the age of seven, when she met a boy named Sammy Bennett at school. Sammy’s father was the coach of a Brooklyn based minor league hockey team, and the team was struggling financially. Due to Sammy’s love for hockey, as he and Josie became friends, she became more and more into hockey (And the two began to root for the New York Civics in fact), and once both their parents saw how much they were getting along, it resulted in Graziani’s not only becoming a sponsor of the Brooklyn team, but several other minor league hockey teams throughout the East Coast, and soon other cities outside of New York saw Graziani’s open up. 

 

As of 1999, Graziani’s has a presence in not only the northeast, but in the Midwest and Mid Atlantic as well. As for Josie, she and Sammy married in 1985 and she inherited the family business a year later after her father passed away. She also has three children: Julia (Born 1988), Eric (Born 1992), and Becky (Born 1995). Eric also wants to play in the PHL when he grows up. 

 

Without further ado, Josie votes for: 

 

Atlanta: The potential fanbase is a large one, and while Atlanta  may be a crowded sports market, Josie feels that owner Joseph Cartwright has enough hockey knowledge to make a PHL team in Atlanta Lewis Cup Contenders in a hurry.

Portland: Despite Vancouver and Seattle already having a presence in the PHL, Josie thinks a new arena and a passionate fanbase will help a Portland franchise compete well with the likes of the Bighorns and Gray Wolves.

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1 hour ago, hawkfan89 said:

Welcome everyone to the 1999 PHL Expansion Committee. The purpose of this committee is to select two new cities to join the PHL as expansion teams to begin play in October, 2001. Before we start, here are some basic guidelines.

 

·       First off I’m going to ask everyone to refrain from making up any current or former players, coaches, general managers, or owners from either the PHL or the GHL. If you would like your character to be any of these roles, I’d ask that you message me and I will suggest someone who either has not been mentioned yet or has very little written about them. The idea here is to maintain consistency and avoid conflicts in the narrative.

·       Although this project was heavily influenced by the AFA project, the PHL and AFA do not exist in the same universe. Please avoid overlap between the two leagues.

·       I will allow rumours because rumours are a part of sports. However, please do not post anything as fact that directly affects the PHL story. Please try to use some sort of disclaimer such as ‘‘there has been a rumour…‘‘.

·       Your character may or may not appear again in the narrative.

·       Your character should not be closely associated with any current or potential PHL franchise. The PHL would like this committee to be as un-biased as possible. There will be exceptions for characters such as players or local media members, however.

·       I would suggest making your character a relatively important person, i.e. a lawyer, politician, media member, etc.

·       Just to clarify something, real-life professional teams from hockey or other sports do not exist in this universe, nor do real-life venues. Real-life non-sports figures do exist for the most part as do real-life non-sports related events, such as World War II or 9-11.

·       This hasn’t really been a major issue yet but please try to make your character as era-appropriate as possible. This committee is meeting in 1999.

·       While I will welcome name suggestions, I do already have ideas for names and logos for most of these cities. However, there has been at least one instance where I scrapped my own idea for one that was suggested on the boards. That was the Nova Scotia Claymores. In that case, Claymores was 10 times better than what I had in mind so I ended up using it, so I do appreciate suggestions for names, even if I don’t always use them

·       Finally, when offering opinions on expansion, please stick to the cities listed.

 

 

Those are the basic guidelines. I’ll post more if any issues come up. For now, here are the main cities in the running for expansion with the pros and cons for each one. The two winning bids will be chosen by the commissioner from the top three voted cities.

 

*Population numbers are educated estimates and include entire metro areas.

 

 

1.      Houston

Population (1999): 4,600,000*

Fan Support: Strong

Owner: Bernie Cratt, an Oil Baron worth nearly $7 Billion. One of the wealthiest men in America who attempted to land a franchise for Houston in 1989.

Arena: TexCo Center, an 18,000 seat arena built in 1985. The home of Houston’s Professional Basketball League franchise, also owned by Cratt.

 

Pros: Houston has been trying for some time to land a franchise. Like Clint Love in Dallas, Cratt’s wealth alone is probably enough to support a team. That likely would not be necessary, however, as fans have shown a lot of excitement at the prospect of having a team of their own. The TexCo Center is still a relatively new building with all the facilities necessary for a PHL team.

 

Cons: Hockey has had a history of failure in Texas, with the Dallas Metros forced to relocate and the Dallas Desperados also struggling. This could be a red flag, especially since Houston – like Dallas - is a fairly crowded sports market with teams in all of the other three major sports leagues.

 

 

2.      Atlanta

 

Population (1999): 4,000,000

Fan Support: Strong

Owner: Joseph Cartwright, a Canadian multimillionaire living in Savannah, GA, who is determined to make hockey work in the region.

Arena: Team would play in the 18,000 seat Coastal Airlines Arena, constructed in 1994.

 

Pros: Atlanta may be the strongest bid the league has received. In 1989, the city was rejected largely due to suspicion that the potential ownership group was using the league to get a new arena for their basketball franchise. That group is no longer pursuing the franchise but the arena has been built and is waiting for a second tenant. Joseph Cartwright, who made his fortune in internet stocks, is a passionate hockey fan from Toronto who has promised to put everything into making an Atlanta franchise work. Atlanta is also one of the biggest TV markets in the United States, a hug attraction for the league.

 

Cons: Atlanta is another crowded market with competitive teams in Basketball, Football, and Baseball. The Baseball franchise won championships in 1997 and ’98. A hockey team may need to become a contender fairly quickly in order to hold the fans’ attention.

 

 

3.      Phoenix

 

Population (1999): 3,000,000*

Fan Support: Unknown

Owner: Bob Winkler, an Oakland-based entrepreneur worth about $90 Million who was born and raised in Vancouver and is a huge hockey fan. Winkler previously attempted to land a franchise for Oakland but was rejected in 1989. After the Nuggets announced their relocation to the city, Winkler focused his attention on Phoenix.

Arena: A 19,000-seat arena will be built by 2001. Team can play in a 14,000-seat arena in Tempe until construction is complete.

 

Pros: Phoenix is a strong bid. Winkler has proven his commitment to the game with his second expansion bid in a second city. The PHL has never had any presence in the desert so the team would be entering a territory all their own.

 

Cons: There are a lot of unknowns about Phoenix. The city is not a traditional hockey market and locals seem to have no real knowledge of the game whatsoever. Winkler has pointed to Miami’s success but even that is unproven.

 

 

 

4.      Tampa

 

Population (1999): 2,000,000*

Fan Support: Fair

Owner: Bay Athletics, an organization that owns Tampa’s Football, Baseball, and Soccer franchises.

Arena: Sun Arena, a 22,000-seat arena to be completed in late 1999.

 

Pros: Despite inconsistent performances on the ice, the Miami Stingrays have developed a surprisingly strong following, proving that hockey can work in Florida. Tampa may even be set up for even more success. The Sun Arena does not have a regular tenant at this point so the hockey franchise would have the building to themselves at least for now, and Bay Athletics has been committed to producing winning sports franchises for over 20 years.

 

Cons: Tampa is also pursuing a basketball expansion franchise and there is concern that it could distract the fanbase from hockey. The fans in the city have been notably more enthusiastic about the potential for basketball.

 

 

5.      Portland

 

Population (1999): 2,000,000*

Fan Support: Strong

Owner: Bruce Goble, a local millionaire worth about $60 Million.

Arena: Team would play in PacifiCo Center, slated to open in late 2000.

 

Pros: There is no question about Portland as a qualified hockey market. Portland fans are typically divided between California and Seattle but would love to have a team of their own. Previous concerns about a suitable arena have been addressed with a new building opening late next year.

 

Cons: Three teams already call the Pacific Northwest home and the market may be a bit crowded. The league would also gain little in the way of national prestige and TV revenue by expanding to Portland.

 

 

6.      Memphis

 

Population (1999): 1,000,000*

Fan Support: Fair

Owner: Harris Investments, a group of local entrepreneurs wanting to bring professional sports to Memphis.

Arena: City would need to approve 20,000-seat arena proposed by potential owners. No other suitable arena at this time.

 

Pros: Memphis is a completely untapped market in the sporting world. The hockey team would be the only professional team in the city and one of only two in the state. There has been a lot of excitement from the locals about the possibility of having a pro hockey team, even if they do not understand the game completely.

 

Cons: The entire bid will hinge on the city’s decision about the arena, which won’t be made until city council meetings in January, 2000. The league will have to decide if it wants to take the risk of awarding a franchise where there is no guaranteed place to play. Atlanta and tampa/Memphis 

 

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Frank Schneider is the CEO of a Japanese automaker's American branch, located in the heart of Tennessee. As an all-around sports fan, especially of teams from the South, he believes that the PHL should continue to expand its Southern footprint (even if the results have been mixed at best). With that said, here are his two nominees for the expansion bid:

 

1. Atlanta. Not only does he have faith in Cartwright's dedication to the game, but he also likes the fact that if they're to be accepted, they'll already have an arena to play in.

 

2. Phoenix. Even though it's a long-shot, his insistence that the Wizards were successful in a non-traditional market makes him feel as though this bid could bear similar fruit.

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I'm going to rework my character (mainly because I'm too lazy to dig back for it, although I do remember some parts)

 

Albert Schneider is the lead sportswriter for the Orlando Sentinel and has turned its sports section into a world-class feature of the paper. Ever since the Stingrays came to Miami, he has covered them and PHL hockey has slowly gained more and more space on the front page. He once tried to bring a PHL-independent minor league to Orlando, which fizzled out very quickly. Therefore, Albert is voting for...

 

1) Houston - Houston is a slam-dunk bid that features a great prospective owner, seemingly good fan support, and a relatively new building to play in. Despite the Desperados currently on life support and the history of hockey in Texas, this one seems different.

2) Memphis - Memphis is a huge risk with the arena not yet on the way, but if they get their arena it will be a huge hit. Schneider feels that the pros outweigh the cons for this one.

Schneider is not voting for:

Atlanta - This was a close choice, but something just feels off about this one. Schneider thinks that it almost feels too good to be true, as subjective as that is.

Phoenix - This has disaster written all over it. An owner that doesn't seem truly committed to the city (he tried to get a team to Oakland last round), an unknown fanbase, and 2 years in a tiny arena outside of the future home market. The desert doesn't seem like a great place for hockey, either.

Tampa - Schneider feels that as good as the Stingrays have turned out, he doesn't want to crowd Florida with too many teams too early. Give it a couple years and it would probably top his list.

Portland - Portland is a great choice, but he remembered one thing - the Portland Grizzlies of the GHL. They folded 17 games into their first season with attendance less than 800 per game and a terrible on-ice product (winging it - let's see how much I remember :P). I'm actually surprised @hawkfan89 didn't mention them, although he may have just forgot.

 

EDIT: Wow, @RightGuard just put up a guy with the same last name right when I posted. Pretty amazing when you think about it.

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Jack Martin, a 52 year old owner of a major appliance store chain in Alabama, has been following the PHL for many years. He follows the predominantly southern teams, like Miami (where he was a season ticket holder) and Dallas. He would like to make a difference in the voting, and bring another team to the south.

 

1. Houston

Houston is a bustling city that seems like a good fit for a team. The fan base and owner seem great, and there are many pros. They will have a great following and success, and I don't think they will be relocating any time soon. It will also create good games, as a rivalry will be created with Dallas.

 

2. Tampa

Tampa is another great city, and a team would be great there. The fan base is good, and with a brand new arena being created, it will develop the teams popularity. The owner company is a good fit because they have athletic ownership experience. A rivalry will also be created with the Miami Stingrays, bringing popularity and good games.

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@hawkfan89what happened to Baltimore?  Also, will the expansion only include a team

from the west and a team from the east? Because it seems like cities like Houston and Memphis could fit both in the Central or the Southeast. 

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On 2/16/2016 at 4:04 PM, RedfieldNick said:

Donald Bell is a former St. Louis goaltender who had a very difficult time making it into professional hockey, as where he was from really made PHL teams pass on him. Being born on August 4, 1945, in Wichita, Kansas, he gained his love for the game watching the local junior team, the Wichita Wingmen, play. He would eventually become the amazing starter for the Wingmen in the Great Plains Hockey League, setting many league records. He went unsigned by PHL teams, then going to St. Louis in the GHL draft's last round. He was a consistent goaltender, and was a great friend of the team's best players. He was very underrated when compared to others on his team, but was always helping young goaltenders at the local ice center. His game was characterized by a strange new style he called the "butterfly" style, dropping to his knees to block shots. He also wore the highest number worn at the time, 84, to represent his birthday (8/4), and had the team logo painted on his mask for the last year of the GHL, which after the year, satisfied with his career, retired. He moved to Kansas City after he finished his career, and opened a successful sports memorabilia shop, which some of the top players in the league have donated precious finds to the shop, including Tommy Cooper and Gilbert Giroux signed game used stick, and his old mask, painted and all. He has a lot of spending money from salary in hockey, and he keeps making profits in his shop, giving him enough to maybe  obtain ownership for a team, and the expansion committee is the first step in that process in his opinion.

He’s back!! Mr. Bell will cast his vote:

 

1) Phoenix

An untapped market, a modern arena that will be ready in a couple years, let’s do it!!

 

2) Atlanta

An immediate rivalry with Miami is a good reason to allow Atlanta to “rise up” and join the PHL

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greg napier, a sports talk radio host and play by play broadcaster for the sacramento royals professional basketball team said on his program today, prior to the royals clash with Los Angeles " so there's an expansion council for the PHL happening, and my 2 favorite expansion bids are portland, because they are great , knowledgeable hockey fans and with the new building opening up, i feel they would be perfect for the PHL. My 2nd choice would be Tampa, because they have a arena ready to go, and have a committed ownership group that always treats me nice when i head down there with the royals to broadcast games. 

 

In the future, i'd love to see sacramento have a team in the PHL if we can get an ownership group together as well, would be a great northern California rivrally. I'd like to know your thoughts call in at 867-5309 or 1-800-867-5309. back after this"

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The San Diego-based music and movie mogul Michael Prince has returned for his second stint on the expansion committee.
 

If you don't know about Michael, read his biography from the '87 expansion committee:

 

Quote

Name: Michael Prince
Age: 45 (now 57)
Origin: San Diego, CA

Michael Prince knows about two things: music and marketing.

A talented guitarist and bassist, he first made money as a teenager as a one-man band playing near Chicago's L stations and outside of Chicago Shamrocks games. He dropped out of high school to pursue his dream full-time; by 1964, he had enough money to open up his own record label, Lakeside Records, at the ripe young age of 22.

Over the next two decades and thanks to Prince's tireless ways of promoting the label, Lakeside grew from a small Uptown Chicago studio to a massive and influential company with hits in rock, pop, soul, and funk. He moved Lakeside to Los Angeles in 1981 and has branched out his empire by producing movies, TV shows, and branded restaurants.

Through his efforts, Lakeside is one of the largest black owned companies in the world.

 

Prince's list:

 

1. Portland. Portland was the third city in his 1987 expansion ballot behind Kansas City (which won) and Cleveland (which eventually got a team). He still believes Oregon is worthy of a team. A local owner with deep pockets, a strong fan base, a built-in rivalry with the Grey Wolves, and a new arena? What's not to like?

2. Atlanta. It came between Houston and Atlanta, but the deciding factor is simple: Texas has a team. Also, Cartwright is a passionate fan of the game, and that only means he will treat the franchise as something more than a write-off. If there's anything Prince has learned from the entertainment business, it's that passion produces a profit.

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