WideRight

USFL Alternative History: 1985 to...

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Love this! The USFL story is so fascinating, its amazing that the seemingly untouchable NFL had such legit competition so recently... I have often thought that if the USFL could have stayed alive until the 1987 NFL strike, things could have been huge.

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2 hours ago, WideRight said:

And had the USFL been around in 1987 the NFL would have had an even harder time securing replacement players, so they likely would have had to cancel games.  Not to mention the stronger bargaining power the players would have had because of the USFL option.  It likely would have caused the 1987 strike to be longer and perhaps lead to an even more favorable contract for players.  Though in my scenario the USFL is not overpaying for a lot of players as much as in the first few years so the leap in salaries that the USFL caused in the 80's might not have been as pronounced. 

Essentially, that scab Redskin team who beat the Cowboys(with almost their regular roster intact) was a mid-level USFL team at best. I know that anything can happen on any given day, however on paper those scab Skins had no business tangling with the 'Boys that night let alone winning the game sometimes i think the NFL is an overrated instiutution, so how i wished the USFL succeeded in my mind at least half the teams wouldve been competitive vs NFL squads, proper football research proves the USFL had a very viable product with very good players like Bill Walsh once said the last 20 players cut on every roster is every bit  as good as the last 20 who made the team, and i think my Redskins-Cowboys scab game theory proves very right, the USFL was not a weak league by any measure......

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1988 Season

 

The 1988 Season would be one of growth and change for the USFL.  With attendance and television ratings rising and expenses stabilized, some of the more successful franchises started to see small profits and even the more troubled franchises were stable, with one exception.  The Blitz simply could not seem to gain traction in Chicago, competing with the Cubs, White Sox, Black Hawks and Bulls for the city’s attention.  With little success on the field and insecurity about their lease at Soldier Field, the ownership group, led by Eddie Eihnhorn made a proposal that the league could not ignore.  The Einhorn group worked in consort with a cohort of investors in Baltimore who had been working to deliver an NFL franchise back to the city since the loss of the Colts in 1983.  The resulting agreement was approved by the USFL owners and at the Fall Owners Meeting the relocation of the Blitz to Baltimore was approved.

 

At the same league meetings, the long-anticipated expansion review process was completed, with bids coming in from Orlando, Portland, Columbus and St. Louis.  While many expected St. Louis to be the frontrunner, the still uncertain situation of the NFL’s Cardinals, who in mid-Fall had not yet finalized and announced their move to the Arizona desert, and the difficulty of arranging a lease acceptable to the primary tenants, baseball’s Cardinals, led to the St. Louis bid evaporating by the time finalists were debated.  Portland, which had at one point been considered as a relocation option were the USFL to move to fall had an open stadium, a strong ownership group and popular support in a growing city that had only the NBA’s Trailblazers as competition.   They were granted the first of two expansion bids.  The second bid was hotly contested between Orlando and Columbus, but with the departure of the Chicago Blitz from the Midwest league owners opted to reinforce the region, provide the Michigan Panthers with a natural rival in Ohio and approved the 2nd bid for Columbus, Ohio, where the new team would work with Ohio State University to make use of the expansive Ohio Stadium.

 

And so, in 1988 the league restructured for 18 teams, with the now Baltimore Blitz moving to the Eastern Division, the Jacksonville Bulls moving into the 5-team South division, Columbus replacing Chicago in the Central and Portland joining the West to form the league’s other 5 team division.   With a short offseason to set up operations, hold an expansion draft and set up rosters, little was expected of the 2 new franchises.  By January of 1988 the new Portland Grizzlies and Columbus Renegades were operational and by the start of the  preseason season tickets were strong, as they were in an enthusiastic Baltimore.  What the teams would look like and how they would play would be discovered later.

 

In player news, the NFL Strike in fall of 1987 had some unexpected impacts.  While there continued to be a steady flow of mid-level NFL players to the USFL, where salaries were competitive, the USFL also saw, for the first time, a flow in the opposite direction as the NFL used the end of some players' initial USFL contracts as an opportunity to steal some big name players from their rivals.   Philadelphia lost Kelvin Bryant to the NY Giants, Michigan was hit hard when QB Bobby Hebert was lured to the New Orleans Saints to be united with former USFL Coach Jim Mora, and all-CFFL DE Reggie White was heavily wooed by several NFL teams before signing with Philadelphia.  These players were replaced, if one can really do that, with rookies rather than NFL veterans, though the Panthers did bring in former Iowa Hawkeye and Detroit Lion Chuck Long to lead the offense.  Top USFL rookies in 1988 included Craig “Ironhead” Heywood for Columbus, Willie “Flipper” Anderson in L.A., QB Chris Miller of Oregon to Portland, and, the eventual USFL Rookie of the Year, RB Thurman Thomas of Oklahoma State in Houston, where he helped solidify the running attack that made the Run & Shoot viable for QB Jim Kelly.

 

With a revitalized Run & Shoot, Houston once again gained the #1 seed in the playoffs and rode that to their 2nd championship, a thrilling shootout against Steve Young and the LA Express.  Other highlights of the season included a strong performance from the relocated Blitz, a decline for the Reggie White-less Showboats and a stronger than anticipated season from the expansion Portland Grizzlies behind a combination of their rookie QB and a defense made up mostly of NFL, USFL and even CFL castoffs. 

 

1988 Final Standings

 

EAST

*New Jersey      11-7

*Baltimore         10-8 Philadelphia       9-9

Washington        8-10

 

SOUTH

*Tampa Bay        12-6

*Jacksonville       10-8

New Orleans        8-10

Memphis              7-11

Birmingham         6-12

 

CENTRAL

*Houston           13-5

*Michigan          10-8

San Antonio        8-10

Columbus           4-14

 

WEST

*Los Angeles     12-6

*Arizona             10-8

Oakland               9-9

Portland               8-10

Denver                 7-11

 

 

1988 Playoffs

                Houston d. Michigan           Los Angeles d. Jacksonville

               Tampa Bay d. Baltimore       Arizona d. New Jersey

               Houston d. Arizona               Los Angeles d. Tampa Bay

 

1988 Championship         Houston 38  Los Angeles 33

 

League MVP: Jim Kelly, Houston

Coach of the Year:  Steve Spurrier, Tampa Bay

Rookie of the Year:  Thurman Thomas, Houston

 

Relocation, Expansion & Uniform Changes:

1.       Chicago Blitz relocate to become Baltimore Blitz

The Blitz opted to keep the same basic logo and color scheme, but re-emphasized blue as the primary color in an attempt to win over resentful Colts fans in Baltimore.

 

2.       Expansion Portland Grizzlies: 

The Grizzlies opted to go with an animal identity local to the area, though few Grizzlies actually journey as far south as Oregon in the 1980’s.  But the name was popular and avoided the issues between the lumber industry and the environmental movements which clashed often in the are.  The unique color scheme, forest green, sandy gold and timber brown, allowed them to play off the University of Oregon’s green and yellow, without being derivative, and connected with the earthy and woodsy nature of the region as well as the moniker “Grizzlies”.

 

3.       Expansion Columbus Renegades:

The Columbus ownership also wanted to connect with the local Ohio State fan base, deciding to bring in both a bright crimson red and black from the Buckeyes, but the lead owner also had an affinity for the look of the Kansas City Chiefs and incorporated an athletic gold (yellow) highlight into the uniforms.  What began as an Ohio State concept quickly appeared to be an homage to the Chiefs and their owner Lamar Hunt, one of the founding leaders of the last major NFL rival league, the AFL.

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FIrst up, the relocated Blitz, now in Baltimore. 

 

 

 

1988 Blitz.png

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Second the expansion Portland Grizzlies, with a logo which combines elements of both the WFL's Memphis Southmen and the NBA's Memphis Grizzlies.

 

 

 

1988 Portland Grizzlies.png

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See next update (Moderator please delete this mispost.)

 

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Finally, the Columbus Renegades, who borrow heavily from the look of the Kansas City Chiefs, while also subtly working in both a C and an O, for Ohio into their logo, a nod to the iconic Ohio State "O". 

1988 Columbus.png

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I like the Grizzlies aside from the logo maybe looking too modern for 1988. No complaints about the Renegades.

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2 hours ago, Jimmy Lethal said:

I like the Grizzlies aside from the logo maybe looking too modern for 1988. No complaints about the Renegades.

I second the Grizzlies logo looking way too modern for their time, but it still looks really good. Love the Renegades identity and color scheme. Nice work!

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My Stallions are cellar dwellers, did Joe Cribbs and a few other guys jump back to the NFL?  

 

Great looking expansion teams there btw

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I agree with the critiques that the Portland logo looks too modern for a 1988 team.  So, I have simplified it.  Maybe the newer version will reappear in the future if the Grizzlies survive into the 2000's.  Here is the modified Portland look. 

 

 

 

1988 Portland Grizzlies.png

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I like the Houston set and the Columbus set as well. Not trying to say what you should do but, it would be cool if the Baltimore group was the group that lead the Marauders bid. I like that you kept the Renegades brand around, are you planning on using any identities from leagues that failed (XFL, CFLUSA & UFL) or will you mostly create your own and pull from USFL history? 

 

I like the series and I'm already hitting refresh in anticipation of the next season. 

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I fully expect some of the trends we saw in the 90's to come into effect.  That  may mean that you will see some names from Arena Football or the World League/NFL Europe as USFL names or designs, because those designers might have gotten work from the USFL instead of other sources.  It also may mean that the shift to darker colors (Navy, BFBS) and the 1990's infatuation with teal may also make an appearance as new teams arrive, or as teams reinvent themselves.   

 

1989 is on its way.  Just working on a uniform redesign for one of the 12 founders. 

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1989 Season

 

The 1988-89 off-season was a relatively calm one for the league.  Aware of the stipulations of their contract with ABC and ESPN, the league begins strategizing for a 2 team expansion in 1990, with one of those teams locked in for Chicago.  The league begins to talk to potential investors and to work on a strategy to better connect with the market.  Several cities, including the two losing bids from 1988, St. Louis and Orlando, begin preparations for potential expansion in 1990. 

 

Perhaps the most surprising turn in the 1988 offseason was the overture made to the LA Express by the NFL’s resident maverick, Al Davis.  Unhappy with the LA Coliseum but ecstatic about the reception his Raiders have received in Los Angeless since their arrival in 1982, Davis reaches across the divide between the USFL and the NFL and begins negotiating a dual-use stadium for the LA Area, with the Raiders and Express sharing the potential new facility.  It is an overture which angers NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle, but there is little that Davis does that does not have this effect.  Quietly among several other owners also seeking new stadia in their cities, the idea of a USFL/NFL partnership seems ideal because it would allow for year round use of a football-specific stadium, making that concept more palatable to local governments asked to pony up public funds.  

 

Another important overture to the league is from the fledgeling FOX TV network.  Launched in 1986, FOX is beginning to eye sports as a way to legitimize itself alongside the “Big 3” networks.  Having gotten nowhere in early talks with the NFL, the new network begins to discuss the idea of a Sunday Night USFL game, pulling a single game from ABC’s Sunday coverage without impacting the ESPN deal.   The USFL will need to restructure again its ABC contract in order for this to go forward, but there is the promise that FOX revenue will more than offset any funds which the USFL would lose from a smaller ABC contract.  Negotiations continue throughout the 1989 season, adding buzz to a league which is already garnering more respect and more coverage than it had in its first few years.

 

On the field the Gamblers and Express remain the class of the league, winning their divisions handily, but some new upstarts in Baltimore and Birmingham rose up to surprise many.  The Neil Lomax-led Blitz and the Stallions, with a healthy Joe Cribbs and a new QB, surprise the league with their success.  In the end, however, experience won out, as the Express, appearing in their third straight USFL Championship were able to pull away from the upstart Baltimore Blitz thanks to a late Young to Anderson 43 yard TD.

 

The league’s biggest NFL signings are long time NFL veteran QB Steve DeBerg, who comes in to replace the ineffective Matt Robinson in New Orleans; Henry Ellard, who left the Rams to play in Baltimore with the Blitz, and Pat Swilling, who brought life back to what had been a moribund Birmingham Stallion defense.   Among the rookies, the best performances came from Michgan’s Marion Butts, Tampa’s new first year QB Rodney Peete, and LB Broderick Thomas, who the Bulls drafted as one of their 2 exemption players, snatching him from a first round NFL selection.   But the biggest breakout star of the league was a 2nd year QB who had not seen the field in 1988, Mark Rypien.  The Washington State product had sat behind Cliff Stoudt in Birmingham, but in 1989, with Stoudt playing shakily in the league’s first 3 weeks, Coach Rollie Dotsch made the switch and Stoudt never got his starting position back.   Rypien reinvigorated the Stallions offense at the same time the defense finally began playing effectively, producing a strong season for the Stallions.

 

1989 Final Standings

 

EAST

*Baltimore        12-6 *Washington    10-8

New Jersey       8-9-1

Philadelphia      8-10

 

SOUTH

*Tampa Bay       11-5

*Jacksonville      10-8

*Birmingham      10-8

New Orleans      9-9

Memphis            6-12

 

CENTRAL

*Houston           12-6

*San Antonio     9-8-1

Michigan           7-11

Columbus         6-12

 

WEST

*Los Angeles    12-6

Oakland            8-10

Arizona             8-9-1

Denver              6-11-1

Portland            6-12

 

 

1989 Playoffs

Los Angeles d. San Antonio         Houston d. Birmingham

Baltimore d. Jacksonville             Washington d. Tampa Bay

 

Los Angeles d. Washington          Baltimore d. Houston

 

1989 Championship         Los Angeles 27  Baltimore 17

 

1989 MVP:  Steve Young, QB, LA

1989 Coach of the Year: Marv Levy, Chicago

1989 Rookie of the Year: Marion Butts, RB, Michigan

 

Relocations, Expansion or Uniform Redesign:

1989 saw no relocation or expansion.  Only one team made alterations to their uniforms as the LA Express, after two straight Championship losses, revamped their logo, and replaced the brighter red trim they had used since 1985, returning burgundy as their third color in a darker color scheme more akin to their first year in the league.  The change worked, as the new meaner Express won it all in 1989.

 

 

1989 Express.png

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My guess for St Louis...

Spoiler

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And for Orlando...

Spoiler

owen1.jpg

Spoiler

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I wonder if a USFL/NFL partnership might warrant joint ownership of a European or indoor league.

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I'm just going to sit here and wait until the Invaders get out of mediocrity...

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Looks like the Stallions are on the rebound...

 

The Express might need a color scheme overhaul in the future, they looked to much Cowboys then they added all that red in '85 and it just looked horrible. i would make them Black Silver and Purple clad squad. would fit the LA image perfectly, imo

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23 hours ago, neo_prankster said:

My guess for St Louis...

  Reveal hidden contents

02f989e07e46764810bce49a22f91fae.jpg

 

And for Orlando...

  Reveal hidden contents

owen1.jpg

  Reveal hidden contents

91Thunder87LasaneWRfullrs.jpg.w300h570.j

 

I wonder if a USFL/NFL partnership might warrant joint ownership of a European or indoor league.

Some good guesses, and I expect that the WLAF style will start to appear in some fashion (as will Arena Football).  I did utilize a WLAF team name, but it isn't the Thunder (yet?).

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Hello all,  1990 is a big year, with a lot to discuss and I felt the need to review who is on which team after so many seasons, so I am splitting this into 2 parts.  Here is part 1.  The second half will be posted as soon as I am satisfied with the two expansion team identities. 

 

1990 Season

 

The 1989-1990 Preseason saw the fruition of several plans which had begun a year earlier.  As expected, the league announced expansion to Chicago as an ownership group led by White Sox and Bulls owner Jerry Riensdorf and a cadre of local investors, including former Bear great Dick Butkis, secured a contract with Soldier Field.  The second franchise selected to bring the league up to 20 teams was also a long-time contender, as St. Louis was selected, though it meant accepting a somewhat-unfavorable agreement with MLB’s Cardinals which would allow the new franchise to use the stadium but would also require them to finance significant turf improvement and acquiesce to the baseball club’s scheduling needs. 

 

The league, seeking to avoid a weak start for both new franchises provided a dispersal draft which favored the new teams, and worked with both franchises to bring in top flight coaches.  Chicago would be headed up by former Bear Defensive Coordinator Buddy Ryan, recently penalized by his NFL club for the so-called “Bountygate”.  St. Louis rolled the dice on another controversial coach, signing the recently released Houston Oiler leader, Jerry Glanville.

 

After vigorous debate, the league opts for the less conventional formation of five 4-team divisions rather than split up regional rivalries.  The 1990 season would begin with the following alignment.

 

NORTHEAST:  Baltimore, New Jersey, Philadelphia and Washington

SOUTHEAST:  Birmingham, Jacksonville, Memphis and Tampa Bay

CENTRAL:  Chicago, Columbus, Michigan and St. Louis

SOUTHWEST:  Denver, Houston, New Orleans and San Antonio

WEST: Arizona, Los Angeles, Oakland and Portland

 

Confident in their staying power and with more franchises showing black in their ledgers, many of the league’s teams made significant pushes to bring in top NFL and rookie talent.  This started with coaching, as seen with the Ryan and Glanville hires, as well as Philadelphia’s shocking hire of former Eagle leader Dick Vermiel, several years after his retirement from football, and Memphis’s decision to release Pepper Rodgers from his duties and bring in the recently fired Crimson Tide coach, Bill Curry.

 

The Michigan Panthers also played this game.  They brought in 49er Offensive Coordinator Mike Holmgren to head the franchise, and he immediately proved that he would shake things up, signing former Michigan star Jim Harbaugh to guide their offense.  This allowed the Panthers to trade the Iowa grad, Chuck Long, off to the new St. Louis franchise, where his regional roots would help bring in fans from the Hawkeye state.  In other big name signings, Columbus was able to sign Ram sack-master Kevin Greene to shore up their defense and St. Louis, hoping to bring in yet more local talent, signed Patriot WR Irving Fryar, a Nebraska grad. 

 

At the annual USFL Draft, it was the new Chicago Machine who were the most aggressive, jumping on Illinois QB, and anticipated top NFL pick, Jeff George.  Granting George one of the team’s exemptions, the Machine signed him well before the NFL could counteroffer.  Other top picks in the class of 1990 were Florida RB Rodney Hampton, taken by Jacksonville in the Territorial Draft and yet another addition for the St. Louis Lightning, Arkansas RB Barry Foster.

 

With all of the changes to franchise players and stars between 1985 and 1990, it seems a good time to highlight the top stars of each franchise before looking at the season’s standings and playoff results.  In 1990, the following players were the faces of their franchises and the top-selling jerseys for each club.

 

BALTIMORE BLITZ— QB Neil Lomax, WR Henry Ellard, DT Mike Golic

NEW JERSEY GENERALS—QB Doug Flutie,  RB Herschel Walker, LB Kurt Gouveia

PHILADELPHIA STARS— QB Chuck Fusina, WR Willie Collier, LB Sam Mills

WASHINGTON FEDERALS— QB Reggie Collier, RB Napoleon McCallum, CB Solomon Wilcots

 

BIRMINGHAM STALLIONS—QB Mark Rypien,  RB Joe Cribbs, LB Leonard Marshall, LB Pat Swilling

JACKSONVILLE BULLS— QB Brian Sipe, RB Rodney Hampton, LB Broderick Thomas

MEMPHIS SHOWBOATS— QB Walter Lewis, WR Marc Carrier, DE Clyde Simmons

TAMPA BAY BANDITS— QB Rodney Peete, RB Greg Anderson, WR Cris Collinsworth

 

DENVER GOLD— RB Dalton Hilliard, WR Vance Johnson, LB Fred Strickland

HOUSTON GAMBLERS— QB Jim Kelly, RB Thurman Thomas, WR Ricky Sanders

NEW ORLEANS BREAKERS— QB Steve DeBerg, RB Marcus DuPree, DB Joey Browner

SAN ANTONIO OUTLAWS— QB Doug Williams, RB Scott Stamper, WR Danny Buggs

 

CHICAGO MACHINE—QB Jeff George, WR Gary Clark, S Mike Prior

COLUMBUS RENEGADES— QB Mike Tomczak, RB Craig “Ironhead” Heywood, LB Kevin Greene

MICHIGAN PANTHERS— QB Jim Harbaugh, RB Marion Butts, WR Anthony Carter, LB John Corker

ST. LOUIS LIGHTNING— QB Chuck Long, RB Barry Foster, WR Irving Fryar,

 

ARIZONA WRANGLERS— QB Steve Beurlein, WR Webster Slaughter, DT Dan Saleamua

LOS ANGELES EXPRESS— QB Steve Young, RB Christian Okoye, WR Flipper Anderson

OAKLAND INVADERS— QB Mark Malone, TE Brent Jones, LB Gary Plummer

PORTLAND GRIZZLIES— QB Chris Miller, WR Brian Blades, LB Dino Hackett

 

What had become clear over the past 7 years is that the USFL, with their exemption policy, was able to retain a lot of its talent, develop new stars and sign enough top college and NFL talent to be seen as a legitimate major league, different from the NFL, but not viewed as a minor league or an upstart anymore.

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1990 Season (Part 2)

The 1990 season saw some surprises, particularly the success of the new regime in Michigan, the competitiveness of both expansion teams and the success of Portland in the West, but nothing was more surprising than the collapse of the Baltimore Blitz, who only the year before had played in the league championship.  With injuries limiting QB Neil Lomax to only 5 appearances, the team struggled to score points and their tendency towards short drives wore out the defense which fell from being ranked #5 in the league in 1989 to #14 in 1990.  Los Angeles and Houston also struggled with injuries which kept them from the dominance they had seen in recent years.  Houston’s injuries were most pronounced as All-USFL QB Jim Kelly went down in week 17, leaving the playoff-bound Gamblers without a strong hand on the reins of the Run & Shoot, leading to a quick exit from the playoffs.  The playoffs were wild, with 2 overtime games and 2 more games settled in the last 2 minutes, but when it was all said and done it was the upstart San Antonio Gunslingers facing off against Herschel Walker and the New Jersey Generals.  In a low-scoring matchup the Generals ground out a win thanks to 131 yards for Walker and a late drive by Doug Flutie and the offense to score the winning field goal with 1:07 on the clock.  Doug Williams tried valiantly to move the Outlaws into last-second field goal range, but a failed 4th and 7 pass ended the game for the Outlaws and gave the Generals their first championship.

 

1990 Final Standings

 

NORTHEAST

 

*NJG          11-7

WSH          9-9

PHIL           8-10

BALT          6-12

 

SOUTHEAST

 

*BIRM       12-6

*JAX           11-7

TBY            8-10

MEM         5-13

CENTRAL

 

*MICH      11-7

CHI            9-9

STL            8-10

COL           5-13

SOUTHWEST

 

*HOU       12-6

*SAN        11-7

DEN        10-8

NOR         4-14

WEST

 

*ARI        13-5

*LA          10-8

POR         9-9

OAK         8-10

 

1990 Playoffs

Arizona d. Los Angeles                   San Antonio d. Houston

Birmingham d. Jacksonville          New Jersey d. Michigan

 

San Antonio d. Arizona                  New Jersey d. Birmingham

 

1990 Championship:       New Jersey 19  San Antonio 17

 

1990 MVP:  Jim Kelly, QB, HOU

1990 Coach of the Year:  Rod Dowhower, ARI

1990 Rookie of the Year:  Jeff George, CHI

 

 

1990 Relocation, Expansion or Logo & Uniform News:

1.       Expansion to Chicago:  Chicago Machine—Sky Blue, Navy and Crimson.  A design that borrows heavily on the famous city flag for the city of Chicago. 

 

2.       Expansion to St. Louis:  St. Louis Lightning—Purple & Athletic Gold.  This design plays on the STL initials used by the city and brings back purple as a team color for the first time since the merger of the Pittsburgh Maulers with Washington.

 

Chicago presented first, then St. Louis. 

 

 

1990 Chicago.png

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