Seadragon76

The Road to Omaha - The 2018 Division I Baseball Championship Thread

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Good year for Pac-12 baseball. Beavers win the NC, Washington makes the CWS & Cal 1B Andrew Vaughn won the Golden Spikes award. 

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I guess having Heimlich as a student-athlete was worth it to Oregon State.

 

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20 minutes ago, dfwabel said:

I guess having Heimlich as a student-athlete was worth it to Oregon State.

 

 

That is a taint that won’t come off of the team, what should always precede mentioning this title.

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I usually don't care who wins the CWS, but Heimlich singlehandedly made me root for ANYONE but Oregon State to win.

 

Like, if Arkansas lost to Florida in the semis and the Gators lost the same way last nigh or tonight, I'd be just as angry. If Mississippi State had beaten Oregon State, then Arkansas did what they did, that's one thing.

 

Heimlich's mere presence at this CWS does not sit well with me.

 

He has NO business being anywhere near a baseball diamond. None.

 

Instead, he gets to celebrate a CWS title.

 

What's wrong with this picture?

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The OSU program can 100% get :censored:ed, and more than just on the program, them winning the National Championship with a convicted :censored:ing child molester on the team stains all of college baseball.

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Never has a team deserved to win less than Oregon State.

 

The fact that they didn't kick him off the team when his thing went down rubs me the wrong way.

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1 hour ago, mania said:

The OSU program can 100% get :censored:ed, and more than just on the program, them winning the National Championship with a convicted :censored:ing child molester on the team stains all of college baseball.

 

Oregon Stain.

 

Seriously, they sold their souls to win a title as far as I'm  concerned.

 

There is no justice.

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1 hour ago, SabresRule7361 said:

Never has a team deserved to win less than Oregon State.

 

The fact that they didn't kick him off the team when his thing went down rubs me the wrong way.

Because even with his guilty plea, one which his parents were in favor of just to get it over with is just the tip of the iceberg in this story.

 

It was what the state of Oregon calls "a clerical error" as what made his conviction public. He's done nothing wrong after sentencing and if not for the "error", his juvenile record would be sealed.

 

Both the SI cover story on him by SL Price and a February 2018 Portland Tribune article shed much more light on the matter. Notably that his brother was going through a divorce when all of this occurred, in addition to the false alert by the state of Oregon.

 

SI: https://www.si.com/mlb/2018/05/16/luke-heimlich-oregon-state

 

Portland Tribune:https://portlandtribune.com/pt/12-sports/385703-274945-penalties-paid-heimlich-ready-to-return-for-beavers-baseball

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11 hours ago, SabresRule7361 said:

I usually don't care who wins the CWS, but Heimlich singlehandedly made me root for ANYONE but Oregon State to win.

 

Like, if Arkansas lost to Florida in the semis and the Gators lost the same way last nigh or tonight, I'd be just as angry. If Mississippi State had beaten Oregon State, then Arkansas did what they did, that's one thing.

 

Heimlich's mere presence at this CWS does not sit well with me.

 

He has NO business being anywhere near a baseball diamond. None.

 

Instead, he gets to celebrate a CWS title.

 

What's wrong with this picture?

 

11 hours ago, SabresRule7361 said:

Never has a team deserved to win less than Oregon State.

 

The fact that they didn't kick him off the team when his thing went down rubs me the wrong way.

 

9 hours ago, SabresRule7361 said:

When Coastal Carolina won the CWS, that was an awesome moment. Tonight was the complete opposite.

 

3 hours ago, SabresRule7361 said:

Oregon State May have won, but college baseball lost as far as I am concerned.

 

 

Jeezlouise. I think the Luke Heimlich story is gross all around, for sure, but maybe collect your thoughts into one post before spamming a thread with multiple posts all containing what's essentially the same comment just rephrased multiple times. 

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He must of gotten his soap box on the cheap. 

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What Heimlich did was evil, reprehensible, etc.

 

But, take him out of the picture for a second; why should his teammates be punished for something they had nothing to do with?

 

What Heimlich should do is step away from baseball and try to change his life. He's never going to fully get away from what happened, but what he should do is try and prevent others from making this same egregious and awful decision he did.

 

Considering Oregon State won this without Heimlich (who got shelled in Game 1), is a testament to everyone else on the team. It's going to be unfortunate for a guy like Abel (who possibly has a bright future ahead of him) who's probably going to be referred to as "that guy who was college teammates with a kiddy toucher".

 

I'm not defending Heimlich at all, I don't think he deserves this; but I think everyone else on the team does. The players who had nothing to do with this deserve it. Who on that team knew this happened outside of those very close to Luke? No one. They probably had no idea.

 

Luke's going to get what's coming to him; no more baseball. He's going to huff and puff about being blackballed or something. But unlike a guy like Kaepernick, this "blackballing" is going to be totally justified.

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21 minutes ago, Dalcowboyfan92 said:

 

I'm not defending Heimlich at all, I don't think he deserves this; but I think everyone else on the team does. The players who had nothing to do with this deserve it. Who on that team knew this happened outside of those very close to Luke? No one. They probably had no idea.

 

Luke's going to get what's coming to him; no more baseball. He's going to huff and puff about being blackballed or something. But unlike a guy like Kaepernick, this "blackballing" is going to be totally justified.

 

Guilt by association, as they didn't kick him off the team once the news came out. By saying and doing nothing, the other players were complicit. 

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There's way too many red flags flying here in this story for me to have a pitchfork and torch attitude towards Heimlich.


From the Portland Tribune

 

Quote

If 16 or older, a juvenile offender in Washington must notify state officials of any address change through the five-year period in which he is registered as a sex offender. (The timeline is two years if the offender is 15 or younger. Heimlich had turned 16 by the time his case came to court in August 2012.) Heimlich gave notice of a couple of moves during his time in Corvallis. Shortly after his 21st birthday — Feb. 3, 2017 — he received a citation from Benton County for failure to re-register. Oregon officials had incorrectly determined him to be a resident of the state. Washington state rules do not require re-registration on a 21st birthday. Heimlich's attorney, Stephen Ensor, took the case to court, and the citation was dismissed.

 

Quote

 


Luke has five nephews and nieces, including two by his oldest brother, Josh. Josh was married for a few years to his ex-wife, who has moved out of state. Soon after their divorce, Josh was granted custody of their two children. The mother had visitation rights that allowed her to have the children with her over Christmas holidays and for a portion of the summer. It was during the summer of 2012 that she brought up the allegations of abuse to Josh after a discussion with their daughter.

Josh spoke with his father, who then had several talks with Luke. During each of the conversations, Luke denied the allegations.

From about 2010 to 2012, and after Josh's divorce, Meridee would watch his children at her home after school while he was at work. She would have them for an hour each morning before they'd go to school. She would pick up the kids from school and bring them home in the afternoon, and Josh would retrieve them after he got off work. During that time is when the alleged incidents involving Luke occurred.

Meridee was with the kids virtually the entire time and witnessed nothing involving the kids and Luke. During a large portion of that period, Luke participated on football, basketball and baseball teams that practiced during that time frame, so he was not often at home when Josh's kids were there.

Josh eventually went to the police about the matter. After interviews with the ex-wife and her daughter, two charges of abuse were levied against Luke.

 

 

Quote

 


The attorney outlined two choices to Luke and his parents.

Luke could plead not guilty but face the possibility of 40 weeks placement in a juvenile institution if found guilty of the charges.

If he were to plead guilty, his case would be reduced to one charge of "child molestation of the first degree," with probation for a maximum of two years. With that, he would agree to undergo juvenile sex offender treatment, which included a number of stipulations. Among them: complete a bi-weekly counseling program, comply with curfew restrictions approved by the probation officer, have no unsupervised internet access, have no contact with the niece, have no contact with any child born after Feb. 2, 1998, not possess or consume alcohol or any controlled substance except by doctor's prescription, register as a sex offender and write a letter of apology to the niece.

 

Luke's parents believed in his innocence. There were several issues, however.

The attorney led them to believe chances were strong that, if Luke fought the charges, he would be judged guilty by the court. The attorney expressed that view that the court system favors the testimony of the victim.

The only way to get into the two-year probationary program was with a guilty plea. If Luke contested the charges, the Heimlichs were led to believe the logical conclusion would be adjudication.

That would mean Luke's incarceration at a juvenile facility for nearly a year, causing him to miss a year of school and a season of baseball. His parents also were concerned that if Luke were found guilty, Josh might lose custody of his children to his ex-wife and that Mark and Meridee would lose the opportunity to be with their granddaughter.

Collectively, Luke and his parents decided a guilty plea was the best route. He could stay at home, attend school and lead a somewhat normal life. If he followed all the rules through the five-year period, his records would be sealed. The parents felt that path would be the quickest toward healing and recovery of the family. They were were concerned that, if Luke contested the charges, it would require aggressive questioning to break down their granddaughter's story. They weren't comfortable with putting her through that.

On Aug. 27, 2012, Luke pleaded guilty to the single charge.

 

Quote

Luke's father has had experts of law tell him there were legal options he didn't know were available at the time. Had he known what he knows now, he likely would have sought a different attorney. Given the risks and the circumstances, if he could have accomplished that without putting his granddaughter through turmoil, he would have changed the decision to have Luke agree to a guilty plea.

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10 hours ago, LMU said:

There's way too many red flags flying here in this story for me to have a pitchfork and torch attitude towards Heimlich.

 

That's where I'm at.  In the interest of full disclosure, I am an Oregon State alum but I'm completely indifferent to the school's athletic programs and haven't cheered for the program since Jacoby Ellsbury played there.  Heimlich probably played into that these last two years, but I'm not so sure I wouldn't have cheered against them either way, to be honest.  But I don't think Oregon State letting him play is as egregious as some members of the forum apparently do.  In fact, it falls in line pretty well with the school's policies on student athlete's with criminal records (which is consistent with the U.S. Department of Education Fair Chance Higher Education Pledge).

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12 hours ago, Dalcowboyfan92 said:

What Heimlich did was evil, reprehensible, etc.

 

But, take him out of the picture for a second; why should his teammates be punished for something they had nothing to do with?

 

What Heimlich should do is step away from baseball and try to change his life. He's never going to fully get away from what happened, but what he should do is try and prevent others from making this same egregious and awful decision he did.

 

Considering Oregon State won this without Heimlich (who got shelled in Game 1), is a testament to everyone else on the team. It's going to be unfortunate for a guy like Abel (who possibly has a bright future ahead of him) who's probably going to be referred to as "that guy who was college teammates with a kiddy toucher".

 

I'm not defending Heimlich at all, I don't think he deserves this; but I think everyone else on the team does. The players who had nothing to do with this deserve it. Who on that team knew this happened outside of those very close to Luke? No one. They probably had no idea.

 

Luke's going to get what's coming to him; no more baseball. He's going to huff and puff about being blackballed or something. But unlike a guy like Kaepernick, this "blackballing" is going to be totally justified.

He led the NCAA in wins and ERA.  While his CWS was poor, he was key in them in position to host both the regional and super regional.

 

As for the CWS itself, using a Freshman for 250+ pitches over six days is criminal in "Sport Court".

51 minutes ago, See Red said:

 

That's where I'm at.  In the interest of full disclosure, I am an Oregon State alum but I'm completely indifferent to the school's athletic programs and haven't cheered for the program since Jacoby Ellsbury played there.  Heimlich probably played into that these last two years, but I'm not so sure I wouldn't have cheered against them either way, to be honest.  But I don't think Oregon State letting him play is as egregious as some members of the forum apparently do.  In fact, it falls in line pretty well with the school's policies on student athlete's with criminal records (which is consistent with the U.S. Department of Education Fair Chance Higher Education Pledge).

It is somewhat conflicting to me as well and that family is wrecked for generations.

 

As for the university, to their benefit in this case, Oregon State DOESN'T USE the Common Application. Had they, it has a question about arrest and convictions since 2006. The Head Coach and President really haven't been convincing regarding why he was admitted to the school.  If you claim athletics is the "front door" to the university, you don't have issues such as this on your porch swing.

 

You also don't change your admission policy after his eligibility is done to ask questions like the Common Application, meanwhile touting how Mike Riley always brought in sexual assault victims to talk to the football team about the issue.

https://www.oregonlive.com/sports/oregonian/john_canzano/index.ssf/2018/05/canzano_oregon_state_hired_bre.html

 

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