Recommended Posts

35 minutes ago, Mac the Knife said:

Who knew getting out of Cleveland was this easy?

 

Imagine how many careers could've been saved simply by the players being up-front and just telling the Browns "trade my ass, please."  ?

Coleman is an Art Briles WR and only ran four routes at Baylor and cannot adjust.

 

 

More importantly, he was the result of the Browns trading the #2 overall pick to the Eagles who took Carson Wentz.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, dfwabel said:

Coleman is an Art Briles WR and only ran four routes at Baylor and cannot adjust.

 

 

More importantly, he was the result of the Browns trading the #2 overall pick to the Eagles who took Carson Wentz.

 

That should be a career-ending decision for whoever made that call, and for Paul Depodesta who said that they didn't project Wentz would develop into a top-20 QB.

 

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000695625/article/report-browns-didnt-see-wentz-as-top20-qb-talent

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

It's going to be a long season, isn't it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, dfwabel said:

Coleman is an Art Briles WR and only ran four routes at Baylor and cannot adjust.

 

More importantly, he was the result of the Browns trading the #2 overall pick to the Eagles who took Carson Wentz.

 

This guy was what I call a "Browns gotta Brown" player - a guy whose career was essentially doomed the minute "Cleveland Browns" got associated with it.  A guy who probably would've had at least a somewhat successful career anywhere but Cleveland or likely was #1 on no one else's draft board.

 

I don't have HBO so I'm missing out on this year's soap opera, but from what little snippets I've seen of "Hard Knocks" (all 3 of them), you've got new guys who are coming in to light a fire under people, and you have people who're so ingrained in a losing mindset that they'll never snap out of it, all led by a happy warrior who wants to win but doesn't know how; with a new big boss that knows how and, without giving it away at all, is evaluating everyone, willing to take this year's lumps, and is quietly preparing to clean house for 2019.

 

25 minutes ago, DG_Now said:

 

It's going to be a long season, isn't it.

 

Nope!  Schedule says it's going to be over by mid-February, same as usual!  :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neutering Football to avoid Lawsuits

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, DG_Now said:

 

It's going to be a long season, isn't it.

 

LOL

 

I think I'm actually done with the NFL this time.  There has to be a way to approach player safety without making the on-field product completely unwatchable

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. Unless it's absolutely blatantly obvious, the flag shouldn't be thrown.  If there's any shadow of a doubt, then don't throw the flag.

2. Increase the penalties off the field (meaning fines and suspensions) for legit roughing / helmet-to-helmet hits.  That way the player/team are still punished, but the risk of terrible calls swinging games/seasons is reduced/eliminated.

 

The other thing is to just review those calls.  I'm not sure why that's hard.  Just have someone in NY text the ref with the right call.  It's 2018 - there's absolutely no reason for 99% of replays to take longer than 60 seconds. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, dfwabel said:

Coleman is an Art Briles WR and only ran four routes at Baylor and cannot adjust.

Baylor receivers also didn't do much blocking in that system. If the ball wasn't coming their way they were literally taught to just take the play off to conserve energy. I'm not an expert in football (or anything), but I can't imagine that bodes well for life in the NFL. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Red Wolf said:

Baylor receivers also didn't do much blocking in that system. If the ball wasn't coming their way they were literally taught to just take the play off to conserve energy. I'm not an expert in football (or anything), but I can't imagine that bodes well for life in the NFL. 

If they keep these tackling rules it will.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, DG_Now said:

 

It's going to be a long season, isn't it.

 

I know it's the preseason but come on. What is he supposed to do? Hold him until the refs blow the play dead?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Adapt or die.

 

Long-term, it's better for the NFL to call the penalty too much and get every player to be actively conscious of their tackling form than to rarely call the penalty and have hits that get away with it or not really change anything.

 

(I'm not saying the hit above is a penalty; it's preseason and it means nothing... I'm talking about all the people who are whining about how often the penalty is being called this preseason).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, GFB said:

Adapt or die.

 

Long-term, it's better for the NFL to call the penalty too much and get every player to be actively conscious of their tackling form than to rarely call the penalty and have hits that get away with it or not really change anything.

 

(I'm not saying the hit above is a penalty; it's preseason and it means nothing... I'm talking about all the people who are whining about how often the penalty is being called this preseason).

 

From what I've heard around the horn, on the earliest levels of play, tackling form and techniques are already improving and changing.  It will take another 8-12 years for these kids to get to NFL age and by then the game still might not have made up its mind about how to deal with this.  What I do know, however, is that making this crap up as you go at the highest level is an awful, awful thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/19/2018 at 9:45 AM, DG_Now said:

 

It's going to be a long season, isn't it.

 

 

 

 

Ridiculous.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/19/2018 at 1:36 PM, Kaz said:

LOL

 

I think I'm actually done with the NFL this time.  There has to be a way to approach player safety without making the on-field product completely unwatchable

I am going to say something I almost never say...It's football.  There are going to be hard hits, etc.  Having confusing penalties like this is just a terrible way to do PR.  I'm guessing that this particular example (the Viking sack of the Jax QB) was not really a "CTE" thing, but a reaction to Aaron Rodgers.  But all these other helmet rules?  Just BS PR that helps keep the narrative with "concussions" and "head-to-head" contact when the reality is probably far less rigid and more related to the head rolling around in the helmet.  

 

To address player safety, I think we have to learn everything we can about the issue: key ages (e.g., maybe nobody plays before senior year of HS), how much is too much (do practices need less contact), the impact of equipment, the impact of PEDs, the kind of hits that lead to problems, etc.  (I can't prove this, but I think hits that don't directly impact the head are contributors).

 

We already knew that many NFL players spent the rest of their lives limping.  CTE's a bit trickier because the rest of us can't "see" it.  But if we understand it, then informed consent (along with some mitigation) is where we're at.

 

These rules are too messy and cut defenders off at the knees.  The "no launching the helmet into the other player" rule is a good one because it's 1) usually not too ambiguous and 2) not something that "game speed" makes impossible to avoid.  That was showboating to get on ESPN.  But two guys moving at game speed and colliding?  I agree with the players that dub that unavoidable.  

 

I think "heads up football" and "correct tackling technique" is kinda PR, though.  Fewer head-contact plays will probably mitigate the problem, but I think the problem is much more complex and intertwined into every part of the game than that.

 

So, ideally, we know everything and either 1) drastically change or 2) mitigate and make sure players are aware of what they are getting into.  Because I don't think they are now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/19/2018 at 1:36 PM, Kaz said:

LOL

 

I think I'm actually done with the NFL this time.

 

 

 

 

https://deadspin.com/for-the-last-time-nfl-ratings-are-not-down-theyre-up-1827378925

 

There were nearly 500 scripted series aired on U.S. TV in 2017, more than double the number that aired in 2009. Netflix, Amazon Prime, and Hulu are driving this massive increase in available programming, and nearly every broadcast network is taking it on the chin as a result. Overall, broadcast networks lost 16% of their viewers in 2017; cable networks lost 11%. And that’s using Nielsen’s “C3" ratings formula, which counts DVR viewings. The NFL only lost 9%.

 

The NFL’s ratings have fallen substantially less than TV as a whole. Indeed, Sunday Night Football remained the highest-rated show for the seventh straight season. Ten years ago, it didn’t even crack the top 10. Monday Night Football’s viewership fell, but only by 3%.


Are NFL ratings down? Yes, but only if you don’t compensate for the overall decline in TV viewers due to streaming services, et cetera. If you do compensate for the overall decline in TV viewers, NFL ratings are up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Teddy Bridgewater's surgeon talks about his knee injury.

 

Quote

"It's mangled," Cooper said. "You make the skin incision, and there's nothing there. It's almost like a war wound. Everything is blown."

 

Cooper performed a reconstruction of Bridgewater's anterior cruciate ligament. "And then everything on the lateral side of his knee was reconstructed, about five ligaments over there," the surgeon said. "We repaired them, then took one of his own hamstring tendons and transplanted it to the lateral side of his knee."

 

The experience was incredibly stressful for a doctor fully invested in his patients. And yet over and over, Cooper maintained that his repair work in such cases is effectively complete on Day 1, and that the athlete is left with overwhelming emotional and physical burdens that he or she has to manage every day for a year or more. In the immediate wake of his injury, Bridgewater said in a statement, "I come from amazing DNA, I watched my mom fight and win against breast cancer. We will, as a team, attack my rehab with the same vigor and energy."

 

Edited by dfwabel
spacing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/17/2018 at 10:08 PM, Kaz said:

lol I didn't know that the Browns hired Williams to be their DC.  What a dumpster fire

Huh, l had a dumpster on fire as a proposed Brown's logo two years ago...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, dfwabel said:

Teddy Bridgewater's surgeon talks about his knee injury.

 

 

 

What exactly happened with him? IIRC there wasn’t any film or photos of the injury, and all anyone said about it was it was gross and they couldn’t look at it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, BringBackTheVet said:

 

What exactly happened with him? IIRC there wasn’t any film or photos of the injury, and all anyone said about it was it was gross and they couldn’t look at it. 

He dropped back during practice and w/o contact, he dislocated his knee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now