Dilbert

Dunkin' Donuts,err wait just Dunkin'

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Hilarious that some people consider Pennsylvania the Midwest. 

 

If your state doesn't even touch Central, Mountain or Pacific Time zones, it's hard to consider it much of anything "west." 

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Pittsburgh and Buffalo are honorary Midwest. It's those Great Plains states I'm not sure about.

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On 10/29/2018 at 10:10 AM, pianoknight said:

Hilarious that some people consider Pennsylvania the Midwest. 

 

If your state doesn't even touch Central, Mountain or Pacific Time zones, it's hard to consider it much of anything "west." 

It’s cultural as much as anything. If it were strictly geography, the Midwest wouldn’t start until Colorado or so. And Pittsburgh and Buffalo were the western frontier... in about 1800 or so.

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I get that historical distinction. Maybe we need a new term?

 

I generally use things like Rust Belt, Great Lakes, Great Plains, Rocky Mountains, etc. to avoid confusion. 

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4 minutes ago, pianoknight said:

I get that historical distinction. Maybe we need a new term?

 

I generally use things like Rust Belt, Great Lakes, Great Plains, Rocky Mountains, etc. to avoid confusion. 

I don't normally use it, either, precisely because I'm not even sure what it's supposed to mean. But if it's a sort of heartland, blue collar, meat and potatoes thing? WNY and Western PA fit there much more than in an Atlantic or New Englandy designation.

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4 hours ago, pianoknight said:

I get that historical distinction. Maybe we need a new term?

 

I generally use things like Rust Belt, Great Lakes, Great Plains, Rocky Mountains, etc. to avoid confusion. 

 

Rust Belt extends into New York, Great Lakes is basically the northwest territory, and the Rockies are not midwest geographically or culturally (not to assume your implications or knowledge, just stating things).

 

Western PA fits culturally with a lot of the midwest, but PA in general is NOT midwest. I consider Ohio thru the Great Plains to be midwest. You could also say the Heartland I suppose. The point is, most of us say "pop."

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I exclusively use the term "Old Northwest," as I am an aggressive traditionalist.

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11 hours ago, Cosmic said:

I don't normally use it, either, precisely because I'm not even sure what it's supposed to mean. But if it's a sort of heartland, blue collar, meat and potatoes thing? WNY and Western PA fit there much more than in an Atlantic or New Englandy designation.

 

Right.  But that "heartland meat and potatoes" thing also applies to parts of Idaho, Eastern WA/OR, Montana, Nevada and parts of NorCal.  So saying "heartland" - and having that term mean both states that touch the Pacific and states that touch the Atlantic - is stupid. 

 

I grew up in Nebraska, so when I hear Midwest or Heartland, I generally think of it like the map below.  The red states are firmly part of that term and the pinkish ring is areas that are kinda/sorta part of the heartland.  For example, parts of Michigan have a lot of farming, but other parts are overwhelmingly focused on steel, shipping, and ports on the Lakes. Likewise, there are certainly farms in Colorado, but there is a lot of other stuff, too.  The states in red are mostly/nearly farmland, save for a few big cities. You could probably cut off the northern tip of Illinois (Chicago) for that reason, too. 

 

swi9MJs.png

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Clearly the Super-Conference Model is the way to go if we’re going to insist on keeping the four team playoff in place. 

 

450px-Census_Regions_and_Division_of_the

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13 hours ago, Lafarge said:

Clearly the Super-Conference Model is the way to go if we’re going to insist on keeping the four team playoff in place. 

 

450px-Census_Regions_and_Division_of_the

 

IMO these are the accurate borders of the midwest. Chicago is the midwest, the midwest has cities. Heartland is more debatable/subjective to my understanding.

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Nah, America’s real heartland is Queens. 😉

 

Seriously, any definition of “Midwest” that excludes Minnesota and Wisconsin, perhaps the two most Midwestern states of all, is seriously flawed. 

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I've always thought that "Midwest" was a terribly broad and vague regional term, and I've never considered myself a "Midwesterner". I've always preferred Great Lakes and Great Plains as regions. I feel much more connected to the western parts of PA and NY, and southern Ontario than I do with Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa and Missouri.

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I think of the Midwest as the broader region that includes the smaller Great Lakes and Great Plains regions. People from the former often seem to think the latter aren't midwestern and vice versa.

 

It's also a distinction that allows you to properly place western PA and western NY with other like-minded areas (Ohio, Michigan, manufacturing Indiana, etc.).

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This conversation went from "Dunkin" to "What States are the actual Midwest?" This is great.

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On 9/25/2018 at 6:53 PM, habsfan1 said:

Domino's is a good name for a Pizza take out.

 

Why?

 

On 9/30/2018 at 10:09 AM, C-Squared said:

I must be the only one who doesn't hate it. The full name honestly hasn't aged well, and doughnuts aren't the most marketable product in 2018. Its not like the brand plunges into ambiguity by simply being called "Dunkin." Its a pretty solid balance of pushing the brand forward without betraying its core identity.

 

Donuts (I've never seen it spelled "doughnuts") are not that marketable in the health-conscious / calorie-displaying world of 2018, plus they sell so much other stuff too.

 

It also helps make it a global brand, since many of their euro/asian stores are either "Dunking Coffee" (specifically I saw lots of these in Spain) or just Dunkin (seen in lots of other places, including Tbilisi Georgia, one of their latest market infiltrations.)  It makes a lot of sense to me.

 

On 10/7/2018 at 10:40 AM, the admiral said:

New Englanders' love affair with this chain confirms my suspicion that New England is the worst food region of America.

 

Maybe it's different in New England, but I've never seen a Dunkin that I felt any kind of local connection to.  Most (at least here) are owned / staffed by Indian or Bangladeshi franchise owners and their families, have all the same corporate slogans everywhere, and other than the "free or discounted coffee after [insert local team here] wins!", have no connection to the community.  I go there, despite living in a hipster haven of coffee shops of all different levels, because I'm usually in a hurry to catch a train or subway and having the app where I can order ahead and just grab it is more important to me than quality.

 

On 10/7/2018 at 5:29 PM, DiePerske said:

Please make sure you know the difference between the mid-atlantic (PA, MD, DE and most agree to add VA and NY) and midwest, where that idiotic thing is from(Ohio)

 

though, scrapple is PA.

 

Scrapple is southeastern and central PA.  Never seen or heard of it anywhere else.  similar to pork roll, but replace central PA with southern NJ.

 

PA is really different between east and west.  Generally, eastern PA would be aligned with the general northeast, but more specifically, yeah - mid atlantic.  There's a certain look that mid-atlantic cities have- mostly the style of houses in the narrow streets, and how rows of residential streets butt up against (or are intertwined with) large CBDs, and also a big port.  Boston has a lot of mid-atlantic attributes, but there's other factors that make it clearly new england.

 

Baltimore is the archetype of a mid-atlantic city IMO.

 

 

On 10/29/2018 at 10:10 AM, pianoknight said:

Hilarious that some people consider Pennsylvania the Midwest.

 

20 years ago when in college in western PA and having my first exposure to the area, I actually made the comment "this is like the midwest", so there's something there.  It's absolutely different there.  Maybe midwest isn't correct, but it's more closely culturally and socioeconomically aligned with the Buffalos, Clevelands, maybe even Detroits than the New Yorks, Philadelphias, New Jerseys, Bostons, etc.  A lot of Pennsylvania is at least "rust belt", but bordering on mid-west.

 

 

On 11/30/2018 at 12:42 AM, the admiral said:

Pittsburgh and Buffalo are honorary Midwest. It's those Great Plains states I'm not sure about.

 

Yeah. Pittsburgh and Buffalo even share unique food tradtions, like the "garbage plate" (more a Buffalo/Rochester thing) and the "garbage sandwich" (AKA something like a Primanti-Bros in Pittsburgh area.)

 

 

 

In conclusion, going to "Dunkin" makes sense.

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9 minutes ago, BringBackTheVet said:

There's a certain look that mid-atlantic cities have- mostly the style of houses in the narrow streets, and how rows of residential streets butt up against (or are intertwined with) large CBDs

 

I really love that Baltimore/Philadelphia vernacular.

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On 12/5/2018 at 11:02 AM, BringBackTheVet said:

 

Why?

 

 

Donuts (I've never seen it spelled "doughnuts") are not that marketable in the health-conscious / calorie-displaying world of 2018, plus they sell so much other stuff too.

 

 

 

http://time.com/2837756/donut-or-doughnut/

 

https://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-spell-doughnut-versus-donut-2017-6

 

https://restaurant-ingthroughhistory.com/tag/doughnut-corporation-of-america/

 

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