Axis_of_Weasel

How to remove hockey jersey iron-on lettering

20 posts in this topic

I'm sorry for creating a new thread I'm sure theres an existing one but I couldnt find anything through search.

I got a new Sabres third jersey for only $40! but there cheap lettering on it (name and numbers) like the one described here on the icejerseys.com site.

its got ironed-on plastic feeling letters/numbers. theres fake painted on stitching on them also.

it seems the lettering is glued onto a name plate which also feels ironed on to the jersey

any tips from anyone on how to remove it? (and the adhesive stains)

i'd prefer not to have to wash it as its brand new

as an aside, does anyone know how the lettering is like on the rbk jerseys? i know the shoulder patches feel plasticy and cheap. I was wondering whether this was just cheap lettering or a botched job.

customization_detail_nhl.jpg

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You can acetone to remove the heat pressed letters and numbers. It will not leave stains or damage the jersey. I have been using this for over 25 years to remove heat pressed vinyl from jerseys, t shirts, whatever. Always test a small part to make sure you don't use too much. And always use it in a well ventilated area. The Reebok numbers are printed on tackle twill, so the twill has an "official" feel to it, but the printed layer and "stitching" seem really cheap.

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Logoman,

if you use this method, will there be an outline of the nameplate on the jersey?

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If it's just heat pressed, then no. If it's actually stitched on, then you can possibly see the holes left by the stitching. Of course, the stitching needs to be removed with a seam ripper instead of using acetone.

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Ok. With all of the experiences I have had with heat pressed numbers, when they come off you can always see the outline from where they were. I have never tried acetone though.

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You can acetone to remove the heat pressed letters and numbers. It will not leave stains or damage the jersey. I have been using this for over 25 years to remove heat pressed vinyl from jerseys, t shirts, whatever. Always test a small part to make sure you don't use too much. And always use it in a well ventilated area. The Reebok numbers are printed on tackle twill, so the twill has an "official" feel to it, but the printed layer and "stitching" seem really cheap.

thx for the advice... you mean acetone like nail polish remover?

how do i do it? separate the lettering from the jersey little by little and pour it on the separation or just pour it on the lettering? does acetone dissolve the lettering or the glue?

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Go to the hardware store, Home Depot, Lowe's, Menards, Ace, Halford's -whatever flavor is in your region and buy a can of acetone. Ask the helpful, friendly sales associate if you need to. I am sure they will know what you are asking for. Use the acetone sparingly on the backside of the numbers and it will dissolve the adhesive on the numbers. It will make the jersey wet, but should not stain or discolor in any way. Sometimes, the numbers will basically fall apart, fall of of the jersey, etc. If this happens, you will see where the adhesive residue is. Just put some more acetone on that and it should remove it with out a problem. Again, I have been doing this for about 25 years so I have refined my method. You will need to use some trial and error but you should have no problem.

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At work, when we have to remove numbers like this we find that heat goes a long way in removing the "outline" left by the numbers. I doubt that you have access to a heat press but if by some chance you do, throw down a sheet of teflon between the jersey and the heat and press it. The residue should be gone or at least diminished.

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That is a very good point, twi. I assumed he didn't have access to a heat press, though.

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Slightly related...

Is there a proper way to wash the authentic EDGE jerseys with the the best stitched-on numbers?

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Just follow the directions on the tag. Keep in mind, over time the adhesive that was on the tackle twill to hold in place before sewing will seperate after many washings. As a result, the numbers and crest will start to have a wrinkled look. Look closely at any pictures of actual uniforms late in the season (after repeated washings) and you will this effect. It's just how the material ages.

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Slightly related...

Is there a proper way to wash the authentic EDGE jerseys with the the best stitched-on numbers?

Also something slightly related...

I am wondering if sewn-on twill is going to become extinct in the NHL. The Reebok press release regarding the new on-ice officials' uniforms also makes reference to a new lettering and numbering system for jerseys. It sounds to me it may be similar to the FiberLok Lextra lettering on MLB batting practice jerseys.

In addition to the introduction of new officials jerseys, the jerseys that will be worn by the Eastern and Western Conference NHL All-Stars will include Reebok?s patent-pending Smoothfit? performance name and numbering technology, which allows players to move more efficiently on the ice and will contribute to improved moisture management. The Smoothfit? performance name and numbering technology eliminates up to 35 percent of the weight inherent to the traditional name and numbering system, which in many cases, includes multiple layers of twill.

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Go to the hardware store, Home Depot, Lowe's, Menards, Ace, Halford's -whatever flavor is in your region and buy a can of acetone. Ask the helpful, friendly sales associate if you need to. I am sure they will know what you are asking for. Use the acetone sparingly on the backside of the numbers and it will dissolve the adhesive on the numbers. It will make the jersey wet, but should not stain or discolor in any way. Sometimes, the numbers will basically fall apart, fall of of the jersey, etc. If this happens, you will see where the adhesive residue is. Just put some more acetone on that and it should remove it with out a problem. Again, I have been doing this for about 25 years so I have refined my method. You will need to use some trial and error but you should have no problem.

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How can you remove the glue residue after the letter is remove, if you do not have a heat press.

Thanks

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So is this the same type of letting that you would get at Game. I have a Authentic St. Louis Blues Jersey with Legace on it and been wanting to remove it, that i had made at a game. I know its not sitch on, i believe they heat press them on.

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I've used a thread ripper on many rbk replicas with the crappy lettering with great success.

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I've used a thread ripper on many rbk replicas with the crappy lettering with great success.

The replicas aren't actually stitched on though, are they? I thought they were just head pressed, as the OP asked.

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I've used a thread ripper on many rbk replicas with the crappy lettering with great success.

The replicas aren't actually stitched on though, are they? I thought they were just head pressed, as the OP asked.

On the replicas that I have purchased and de-lettered they layer closest to the jersey is sewn on and has a very, very, very, very light adheisivve on it.

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I've used a thread ripper on many rbk replicas with the crappy lettering with great success.

The replicas aren't actually stitched on though, are they? I thought they were just head pressed, as the OP asked.

On the replicas that I have purchased and de-lettered they layer closest to the jersey is sewn on and has a very, very, very, very light adheisivve on it.

I'll have to inspect mine closer. I picked up one of the Sean Avery replicas when AJ Wright had them. Gotta get that little bugger off the jersey.

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I've used a thread ripper on many rbk replicas with the crappy lettering with great success.

The replicas aren't actually stitched on though, are they? I thought they were just head pressed, as the OP asked.

On the replicas that I have purchased and de-lettered they layer closest to the jersey is sewn on and has a very, very, very, very light adheisivve on it.

I'll have to inspect mine closer. I picked up one of the Sean Avery replicas when AJ Wright had them. Gotta get that little bugger off the jersey.

I bought the same jersey and unstitched it.

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