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What Are You Reading?

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CS85    5,387
8 hours ago, maz said:

"American Gods"

 

It's...  Interesting. I love it, though.

 

Neil Gaiman is an interesting storyteller.  I read The Sandman graphic novel compendiums a few months ago, and it's easily the best and most interesting comic I've ever read.  I can't recommend it enough.  From what I've read about American Gods it's kind of cut from the same cloth, but I have no idea how it'll translate to television.

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maz    133
15 minutes ago, CS85 said:

 

Neil Gaiman is an interesting storyteller.  I read The Sandman graphic novel compendiums a few months ago, and it's easily the best and most interesting comic I've ever read.  I can't recommend it enough.  From what I've read about American Gods it's kind of cut from the same cloth, but I have no idea how it'll translate to television.

 You know, the whole time I was thinking to myself, "I can see this being on, like, HBO or Netflix or something." It feels perfect for that hour-long premium cable channel-type format. This is the first I'm hearing of it being on TV. Better finish it before it comes on, because I'm also really curious to see how it goes. If they follow the source material faithfully it could take a few seasons, I'm about halfway through and it's been quite an adventure already.

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CS85    5,387
20 minutes ago, maz said:

 You know, the whole time I was thinking to myself, "I can see this being on, like, HBO or Netflix or something." It feels perfect for that hour-long premium cable channel-type format. This is the first I'm hearing of it being on TV. Better finish it before it comes on, because I'm also really curious to see how it goes. If they follow the source material faithfully it could take a few seasons, I'm about halfway through and it's been quite an adventure already.

 

I believe Showtime is picking it up.  Has Ian McShane in it as Wednesday, and I adore McShane, so fingers crossed it's good.

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SFGiants58    2,067

43365.jpg

 

There is far more to this book than "Bacon's Rebellion created widespread African slavery in the future United States." The "American paradox" that Morgan proposes, the idea that the democratic practices of the future United States were made possible through slavery's implementation and the union of wealthy and poor whites against African slaves, is one of the most important theses in Early American history.

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BigBubba    723

51hG8wl4KtL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

 

Read this over Christmas. An excellent look into the dynamics of Carter's White House and how his administration's foreign policy was shaped. It was very interesting to see how the infighting and power dynamics played out among his cabinet members, aides, and staff -- they really can exert a considerable amount of influence on the President (which, if you think about the roles they play, makes a lot of sense but that's not something I had really thought about before). And, of course, a major theme throughout the book was the fact that Carter came to DC as an outsider with little foreign policy expertise, which made him only more susceptible to "the establishment." What's that saying again? Those who don't learn from history...gah, I forget the rest.

 

ronmaclean.jpg

 

Bought this when it came out, started it, didn't finish (I hate doing that, but it happened). Read it all the way through last month. A fun read. 

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sc49erfan15    896

11612989.jpg  51LVx6UrW5L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

 

I finished "The Dictator's Handbook" a week or so ago. I thought it was very interesting, informative, and easy to read (yet in-depth) explanation of politics dealing with everything from dictators to natural resources to democracies to wars. Highly recommended.

 

I've avoided reading "Guns, Germs, and Steel" for a long time. I figured I'd give it a go. Gives me some good entry-level fodder for some of my classes - I held out too long.

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Zeus89725    996

I'm re-reading it now, but I'm in love with "Into the Wild."

 

It's a really good story, and I respect Chris McCandless a lot.

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CS85    5,387
10 hours ago, Zeus89725 said:

I'm re-reading it now, but I'm in love with "Into the Wild."

 

It's a really good story, and I respect Chris McCandless a lot.

 

His story is very romantic, but I found his death to be extremely appropriate.  Nature does not automatically reward romantic escapism. 

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2001mark    1,188

WarRoom.jpg

Had this on my shelf a couple years now... it's actually as much about Pioli & Dimitroff's use (+ differentials) of Belichick's strategies with the Chiefs & Falcons respectively. I think it was published in 2011 so it's a touch dated.  Both men were on BB's staff during the 01-04 3 titles run.

Fascinating draft talk & not just about the Patriots' ways - a huge criteria for draftees is who are the most urgent players.  Meaning, who not only plays with a keen sense of urgency, yet practices, & even has a lifestyle focused on hard work & results.  They talk about how the Patriots went off their dna to select rb L.Maroney & wr C.Jackson, only for waste because neither paid much attention to their improvements, let alone wanting to get enough sleep.

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MJWalker45    1,058

Iron Kingdom Audiobook

When Nobody Was Watching Audiobook

The Run of His Life Audiobook

Flipping between these three right now. Also doing some reading on the Mexican Punitive Expedition as well. Just finished these:

Leading Audiobook

The Gruffalo Audiobook

Isabella: The Warrior Queen Audiobook

Batman and Psychology Audiobook

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Zeus89725    996
5 hours ago, CS85 said:

 

His story is very romantic, but I found his death to be extremely appropriate.  Nature does not automatically reward romantic escapism. 

 

 

That's true, but I admire his ability to put the world behind him, burn all his money, and do what he loved. I have no intention of dying in an Alaskan bus, but I still look up to him for doing that.

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sc49erfan15    896
5 hours ago, Zeus89725 said:

That's true, but I admire his ability to put the world behind him, burn all his money, and do what he loved. I have no intention of dying in an Alaskan bus, but I still look up to him for doing that.

 

As if he did?

 

"Putting the world behind him" is one thing. Venturing into harsh Alaskan wilderness without as much as a detailed map of the area, knowledge of the terrain, or a field guide to edible plants and seeds is another.

 

It's a "really good story" about the essentiality of preparation and how harsh reality can be.

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greyraven8    102
On 9/26/2016 at 8:50 PM, sc49erfan15 said:

 

I enjoyed it. I think I've read all of his books (The Bullpen Gospels, Out Of My League, Bigger Than the Game) at one time or another. I might have missed one (because they do kind of run together), but I'm not sure which. The "tales from a non-star/bench player" types of sports books are far and away my favorite. In somewhat of an order, these are my favorites from that particular sub-genre:

 

"A Few Seconds of Panic" by Stefan Fatsis

"Can I Keep My Jersey?" by Paul Shirley

"Odd Man Out" by Matt McCarthy

"Slow Getting Up" by Nate Jackson

"Out Of Their League" by Dave Meggyesy

"Don't Put Me In, Coach" by Mark Titus

"What Day is Today?" by Kenny Beck

 

There have to be a few I'm forgetting, and "Ball Four" and "Paper Lion" are intentionally excluded because I don't think it's fair to rank them.

 

FWIW, solid selections for your current readings. I really enjoyed "Loose Balls" and thought "Where Nobody Knows Your Name" was decent. I eat up books about minor league baseball, but expected more from Feinstein.

 

Trying to think of what I have close to or in that sub-genre. The first couple I can think of have the author following a lower level team.

 

Zamboni Rodeo by Jason Cohen:

http://zambonirodeo.com/

 

Baseballissimo by Dave Bidini.

http://www.quillandquire.com/review/baseballissimo-my-summer-in-the-italian-minor-leagues/

 

Tropic of Hockey by the same author.

https://www.amazon.ca/Tropic-Hockey-Search-Unlikely-Places/dp/0771014589


 

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sc49erfan15    896
15 hours ago, greyraven8 said:

 

Trying to think of what I have close to or in that sub-genre. The first couple I can think of have the author following a lower level team.

 

Zamboni Rodeo by Jason Cohen:

http://zambonirodeo.com/

 

Baseballissimo by Dave Bidini.

http://www.quillandquire.com/review/baseballissimo-my-summer-in-the-italian-minor-leagues/

 

Tropic of Hockey by the same author.

https://www.amazon.ca/Tropic-Hockey-Search-Unlikely-Places/dp/0771014589

 

Thanks for those suggestions - they all look interesting! I think I'll have to put those on my summer reading list.

 

For now, I'm about halfway through something else I'm giving another shot - started reading this years ago and it never took hold. This time, in audio form:

 

515xErPPvmL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

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Ice_Cap    7,765

Re-reading Geoffrey of Monmouth's The History of the Kings of Britain.

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sc49erfan15    896
2 hours ago, Ice_Cap said:

Re-reading Geoffrey of Monmouth's The History of the Kings of Britain.

 

Possibly the most Ice_Cappiest of all the books?

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Ice_Cap    7,765
On 2017-04-24 at 8:37 PM, sc49erfan15 said:

 

Possibly the most Ice_Cappiest of all the books?

I'm rereading it in preparation for the new King Arthur movie. I'm excited. That Clive Owen attempt was an abomination. The Lost Legion was good, but it was more a low-budget Arthurian prequel than a proper Arthur movie.

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sc49erfan15    896

Thanks to suggestions from this thread and a "Buy 3, Get 1 Free" sale from Better World Books, this should do me a while.

 

 

books.jpg

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sc49erfan15    896

I started with "Life on the Rim: A Year in the Continental Basketball Association" by David Levine.

 

Another in the familiar "writer follows a team for a year" series of sports books, this one following the 1988-89 Albany Patroons. The book itself is mostly unremarkable - the writing isn't bad, but it isn't Hemingway - a typical "day-by-day" report. The vignettes are typical of minor league life on the road, regardless of sport: cheap motels, players in search of amusement, a few funny stories. The CBA was a legitimate minor league to the NBA during this time, and more than a few "call-ups" happen. I enjoyed this one mostly because I could do a real-life "where are they now" on many of the players and coaches featured prominently - George Karl coaches the Patroons and is by far the most well-known, but a fan of 80s-90s NBA might recognize Vince Askew, Kelvin Upshaw, John Stroeder, Dirk Minniefield, and a few others. I enjoy that about minor league books - some people end up stars, others end up anonymous. All in all, it was an enjoyable read.

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