knnhrvy16

What Are You Reading?

338 posts in this topic

I've finished Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers and The Tipping Point since Christmas. I'm now halfway through Michael Crichton's Micro. All three are fantastic.

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As a sports analyst and college basketball commentator, I found the book Scorecasting: The Hidden Influences Behind How Sports Are Played And Games Are Won interesting, and then next I'll be reading Soccernomics. For class, I've got to read and write a term paper on The Invisible Man.

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Hamlet in AP Lit.

It's not bad, but my teacher says that you have to hear it, not read it. So she plays a tape of it, and the actors are so over the top.

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Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters

Edited to add: I just found out Major Winters passed away last January. RIP.

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I want to write more but I only have a second right now. I'll be back to add more but wanted to get the discussion started.

The Hunger Games

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I want to write more but I only have a second right now. I'll be back to add more but wanted to get the discussion started.

The Hunger Games

Same here. I'm really enjoying it.

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book.jpg

Dear God, help me in this course!!!

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Just finished:

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You should check out "Helmet For My Pillow" by Robert Leckie. It was one of the source books for "The Pacific". It's very well-written and quite interesting. I finished it just before the new year.

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I've been reading Doc Ford novels lately. It's an author from Sanibel Florida which is a area I love to visit and the novels focus on that area primarily. They aren't literary genius but they are books that are entertaining and I can't put them down once I start them.

I'm also reading Steve Jobs biography. So far its really good and interesting to hear the development of modern personal computing!

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Just finished:

101754990.jpg

You should check out "Helmet For My Pillow" by Robert Leckie. It was one of the source books for "The Pacific". It's very well-written and quite interesting. I finished it just before the new year.

Thanks, it's on my list. Just watched The Pacific on DVD and I started Eugene Sledge's With the Old Breed yesterday. Unbelievable. My dad fought at Guam, Leyte, and Okinawa with the Army's 77th Division. To see a lot of what he told me about (grudgingly, he usually wouldn't talk about it) played out on screen...just really makes it more real. The personal accounts are the way to go. Reading the Army's histories and such, when they say "the 77th secured such-and-such objective," well, those few words can't begin to describe what was really going on.

This guy, interviewed a couple of days ago, was in my dad's division if anyone's interested in learning more about Okinawa.

My dad's outfit got the ultimate compliment from the Marines they fought beside: the nickname "77th Marine Division." My dad never told me that, I saw it in a news article about his unit's activities on Okinawa.

BTW, a fantastic resource is the website criticalpast.com. It has tens of thousands of historical film clips. For example, this combat footage, which is my dad's regiment of the 77th Division on Okinawa. For all I know he's in one of these clips (haven't been through them all).

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Unearthing another biography from my bookshelf:

rogue-tory-life-legend-john-g-diefenbaker-denis-smith-hardcover-cover-art.jpg

Rogue Tory: The Life and Legend of John G. Diefenbaker by Denis Smith. It's a book I've owned for two years, yet haven't read once yet before now. It's an intresting read so far. I've always found Diefenbaker to be a truly fascinating world leader in history.

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Unearthing another biography from my bookshelf:

rogue-tory-life-legend-john-g-diefenbaker-denis-smith-hardcover-cover-art.jpg

Rogue Tory: The Life and Legend of John G. Diefenbaker by Denis Smith. It's a book I've owned for two years, yet haven't read once yet before now. It's an intresting read so far. I've always found Diefenbaker to be a truly fascinating world leader in history.

More than rogue. There were many people in the Progressive Conservative Party in the early 60's who were convinced that Diefenbaker was completely bonkers and possibly even insane. "Right Honourable Men" is an interesting read if you get around to it, just try to get past Michael Bliss' unabashed Mackenzie King fellatio. After reading it I determined the only PM I'd like to sit down and have drink with was Borden. The rest of them are all reprehensible for different reasons.

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ErniesPaperLarge_40.jpg

Truly beautiful.

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Unearthing another biography from my bookshelf:

rogue-tory-life-legend-john-g-diefenbaker-denis-smith-hardcover-cover-art.jpg

Rogue Tory: The Life and Legend of John G. Diefenbaker by Denis Smith. It's a book I've owned for two years, yet haven't read once yet before now. It's an intresting read so far. I've always found Diefenbaker to be a truly fascinating world leader in history.

More than rogue. There were many people in the Progressive Conservative Party in the early 60's who were convinced that Diefenbaker was completely bonkers and possibly even insane. "Right Honourable Men" is an interesting read if you get around to it, just try to get past Michael Bliss' unabashed Mackenzie King fellatio. After reading it I determined the only PM I'd like to sit down and have drink with was Borden. The rest of them are all reprehensible for different reasons.

Thanks for the suggestion, I'll definitely have to give it a look (I'll probably have to snag it through Amazon like I did Rogue Tory...it's hard to find any Canadian history books in Utah :P). Sounds very intriguing.

Yeah, I haven't gotten to his leadership and PM years yet in the book (I just got to his loss against King in the Prince Albert riding in 1926), but what I've known of him before reading the book seems to indicate what you mentioned regarding the Progressive Conservative party's eventual attitude towards him. Granted, I don't claim to know the details by any means, but it seems he was tossed pretty hard out in '67 in favor of Stanfield. I'm anxious to get into the chapters devoted to his later career to see what the book has to say about it.

My personal opinion of Diefenbaker, based on what little I have been able to learn about him, is that he was a genuine patriot and genuinely sought to do what he thought best for Canada, but was a man perhaps behind the times, if you will. Perhaps a bit too "old-school" for his era. There's a great line Smith uses to describe Diefenbaker in retrospect (I can't seem to find the page with the quote, so I'll paraphrase as best as I can): "He was a good old dog who just had trouble learning new tricks."

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Unearthing another biography from my bookshelf:

rogue-tory-life-legend-john-g-diefenbaker-denis-smith-hardcover-cover-art.jpg

Rogue Tory: The Life and Legend of John G. Diefenbaker by Denis Smith. It's a book I've owned for two years, yet haven't read once yet before now. It's an intresting read so far. I've always found Diefenbaker to be a truly fascinating world leader in history.

More than rogue. There were many people in the Progressive Conservative Party in the early 60's who were convinced that Diefenbaker was completely bonkers and possibly even insane. "Right Honourable Men" is an interesting read if you get around to it, just try to get past Michael Bliss' unabashed Mackenzie King fellatio. After reading it I determined the only PM I'd like to sit down and have drink with was Borden. The rest of them are all reprehensible for different reasons.

Thanks for the suggestion, I'll definitely have to give it a look (I'll probably have to snag it through Amazon like I did Rogue Tory...it's hard to find any Canadian history books in Utah :P). Sounds very intriguing.

Yeah, I haven't gotten to his leadership and PM years yet in the book (I just got to his loss against King in the Prince Albert riding in 1926), but what I've known of him before reading the book seems to indicate what you mentioned regarding the Progressive Conservative party's eventual attitude towards him. Granted, I don't claim to know the details by any means, but it seems he was tossed pretty hard out in '67 in favor of Stanfield. I'm anxious to get into the chapters devoted to his later career to see what the book has to say about it.

My personal opinion of Diefenbaker, based on what little I have been able to learn about him, is that he was a genuine patriot and genuinely sought to do what he thought best for Canada, but was a man perhaps behind the times, if you will. Perhaps a bit too "old-school" for his era. There's a great line Smith uses to describe Diefenbaker in retrospect (I can't seem to find the page with the quote, so I'll paraphrase as best as I can): "He was a good old dog who just had trouble learning new tricks."

In 1976 or 1977 he gave a speech at the school my mother worked at (my eventual elementary school a few years later). She had it on cassette. I remember digitizing it a few years ago. I'll look and see if I can find it. If I do, I'll post it somewhere. I remember it being rather entertaining.

For the record, I don't think he was nuts ... just out of touch and out of the times that spawned him. He was trying to apply old world rules to the nuclear age. An example presented in "Right Honourable Men" was that his notions of propriety required him to ask Ellen Fairclough (the first female cabinet minister) to leave the room while the cabinet debated whether or not to commute a death sentence.

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Reading Beowulf again. I love a book that yells at you!

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