RedSox44

Kony 2012

214 posts in this topic

Qualifier: Kony is a despicable human being and there is a special ring in hell for people like him.

Now, I'm going to comment on the group behind the "project": Invisible Children. Having interacted with several people who were extremely involved in IC, I have never been so turned off to a 'charity' organization in my life. What a bunch of first-rate, hipster douchebags that love to rub it in your face that they're "charitable". Basically, while the ultimate goal of IC is a noble one; to me the message gets lost between the rockstars and concerts, the new merchline that comes out every 4 months, and the "NEW!!!!!" documentary that comes out every 2 years (during my college years alone there must have been 3-4 documentary/rallies). If I "donate" my money to them, chances are that it's not going to directly help those children, but instead it will help print a t-shirt or send Fall Out Boy on a reunion tour or buy new documentary mixing software... I find myself having the same feelings towards people who spend 60 dollars on a pair of TOM'S just so they can be hip or claim that they're charitable. It's not true charity, but a poor, self-gratifying version of it.

Please don't take it that I am against the principles that Invisible Children or TOM'S are built upon, as both are trying to make positive influences on the world, because I'm not. I'm just sick of seeing people feigning charity to either put themselves on a podium or to become "cool" or "hip." There are so many other and better ways for people to directly help those in need. For example, last year, my friends and I raised $5000 dollars to put a clean drinking well in an overseas village through Charity: Water. You could buy mosquito nets to help stop the malaria pandemic in Africa. You could raise money to buy a child's freedom out of India's human trafficking network. You could sponsor an overseas child and give him food and schooling for around a dollar a day. I'm meeting with my same friends next month to research how to potentially start a "pass back" program to Africa for used soccer equipment... There are endless ways of directly helping those in need, if you actually want to make a difference yourself. The problem is that when real charity is done, it doesn't show up in a slickly cut documentary on your facebook wall or allow you to wear the coolest new clothing to show off to your friends.

Yes, the Ugandan war is horrifying and should be stopped. But buying "action kits" with minimalistic typography posters and tri-cotton blend t-shirts isn't my definition of helping.

I'm not doing this to be "cool". I'm doing this because 30,000 children have been abducted, raped or killed. Sometimes all three.

I'm also not denying there are people like that in the movement, but saying that everyone involved is just a hipster showing off to their friends is ignorant.

On your final paragraph: no one is dumb enough to think that putting up posters and slapping bumper stickers on our Priuses is going to stop the conflict or catch Kony. The whole point of the Kony 2012 movement is to make him famous, let people know about him and the atrocities he has committed, so that there's public outcry to get him.

Yes, this is by no means perfect. But is sitting on our asses in blissful ignorance any better?

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Qualifier: Kony is a despicable human being and there is a special ring in hell for people like him.

Now, I'm going to comment on the group behind the "project": Invisible Children. Having interacted with several people who were extremely involved in IC, I have never been so turned off to a 'charity' organization in my life. What a bunch of first-rate, hipster douchebags that love to rub it in your face that they're "charitable". Basically, while the ultimate goal of IC is a noble one; to me the message gets lost between the rockstars and concerts, the new merchline that comes out every 4 months, and the "NEW!!!!!" documentary that comes out every 2 years (during my college years alone there must have been 3-4 documentary/rallies). If I "donate" my money to them, chances are that it's not going to directly help those children, but instead it will help print a t-shirt or send Fall Out Boy on a reunion tour or buy new documentary mixing software... I find myself having the same feelings towards people who spend 60 dollars on a pair of TOM'S just so they can be hip or claim that they're charitable. It's not true charity, but a poor, self-gratifying version of it.

Please don't take it that I am against the principles that Invisible Children or TOM'S are built upon, as both are trying to make positive influences on the world, because I'm not. I'm just sick of seeing people feigning charity to either put themselves on a podium or to become "cool" or "hip." There are so many other and better ways for people to directly help those in need. For example, last year, my friends and I raised $5000 dollars to put a clean drinking well in an overseas village through Charity: Water. You could buy mosquito nets to help stop the malaria pandemic in Africa. You could raise money to buy a child's freedom out of India's human trafficking network. You could sponsor an overseas child and give him food and schooling for around a dollar a day. I'm meeting with my same friends next month to research how to potentially start a "pass back" program to Africa for used soccer equipment... There are endless ways of directly helping those in need, if you actually want to make a difference yourself. The problem is that when real charity is done, it doesn't show up in a slickly cut documentary on your facebook wall or allow you to wear the coolest new clothing to show off to your friends.

Yes, the Ugandan war is horrifying and should be stopped. But buying "action kits" with minimalistic typography posters and tri-cotton blend t-shirts isn't my definition of helping.

I'm not doing this to be "cool". I'm doing this because 30,000 children have been abducted, raped or killed. Sometimes all three.

I'm also not denying there are people like that in the movement, but saying that everyone involved is just a hipster showing off to their friends is ignorant.

On your final paragraph: no one is dumb enough to think that putting up posters and slapping bumper stickers on our Priuses is going to stop the conflict or catch Kony. The whole point of the Kony 2012 movement is to make him famous, let people know about him and the atrocities he has committed, so that there's public outcry to get him.

Yes, this is by no means perfect. But is sitting on our asses in blissful ignorance any better?

I think the point is there are more effective ways of providing Africans assistance to help themselves.

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Qualifier: Kony is a despicable human being and there is a special ring in hell for people like him.

Now, I'm going to comment on the group behind the "project": Invisible Children. Having interacted with several people who were extremely involved in IC, I have never been so turned off to a 'charity' organization in my life. What a bunch of first-rate, hipster douchebags that love to rub it in your face that they're "charitable". Basically, while the ultimate goal of IC is a noble one; to me the message gets lost between the rockstars and concerts, the new merchline that comes out every 4 months, and the "NEW!!!!!" documentary that comes out every 2 years (during my college years alone there must have been 3-4 documentary/rallies). If I "donate" my money to them, chances are that it's not going to directly help those children, but instead it will help print a t-shirt or send Fall Out Boy on a reunion tour or buy new documentary mixing software... I find myself having the same feelings towards people who spend 60 dollars on a pair of TOM'S just so they can be hip or claim that they're charitable. It's not true charity, but a poor, self-gratifying version of it.

Please don't take it that I am against the principles that Invisible Children or TOM'S are built upon, as both are trying to make positive influences on the world, because I'm not. I'm just sick of seeing people feigning charity to either put themselves on a podium or to become "cool" or "hip." There are so many other and better ways for people to directly help those in need. For example, last year, my friends and I raised $5000 dollars to put a clean drinking well in an overseas village through Charity: Water. You could buy mosquito nets to help stop the malaria pandemic in Africa. You could raise money to buy a child's freedom out of India's human trafficking network. You could sponsor an overseas child and give him food and schooling for around a dollar a day. I'm meeting with my same friends next month to research how to potentially start a "pass back" program to Africa for used soccer equipment... There are endless ways of directly helping those in need, if you actually want to make a difference yourself. The problem is that when real charity is done, it doesn't show up in a slickly cut documentary on your facebook wall or allow you to wear the coolest new clothing to show off to your friends.

Yes, the Ugandan war is horrifying and should be stopped. But buying "action kits" with minimalistic typography posters and tri-cotton blend t-shirts isn't my definition of helping.

I'm not doing this to be "cool". I'm doing this because 30,000 children have been abducted, raped or killed. Sometimes all three.

I'm also not denying there are people like that in the movement, but saying that everyone involved is just a hipster showing off to their friends is ignorant.

On your final paragraph: no one is dumb enough to think that putting up posters and slapping bumper stickers on our Priuses is going to stop the conflict or catch Kony. The whole point of the Kony 2012 movement is to make him famous, let people know about him and the atrocities he has committed, so that there's public outcry to get him.

Yes, this is by no means perfect. But is sitting on our asses in blissful ignorance any better?

I think the point is there are more effective ways of providing Africans assistance to help themselves.

GFB named other organizations, which no doubt are incredibly helpful, good, noble causes, and we should certainly all support them. However, those organizations, while being noble and good, do not directly stop the LRA or help catch Kony, who is among the most wanted international war criminals by The Hague.

If there are better ways to stop Kony, I'm all ears.

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I like the logo?

tumblr_m0hvkyFxg01qen78ko1_500.jpg

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Qualifier: Kony is a despicable human being and there is a special ring in hell for people like him.

Now, I'm going to comment on the group behind the "project": Invisible Children. Having interacted with several people who were extremely involved in IC, I have never been so turned off to a 'charity' organization in my life. What a bunch of first-rate, hipster douchebags that love to rub it in your face that they're "charitable". Basically, while the ultimate goal of IC is a noble one; to me the message gets lost between the rockstars and concerts, the new merchline that comes out every 4 months, and the "NEW!!!!!" documentary that comes out every 2 years (during my college years alone there must have been 3-4 documentary/rallies). If I "donate" my money to them, chances are that it's not going to directly help those children, but instead it will help print a t-shirt or send Fall Out Boy on a reunion tour or buy new documentary mixing software... I find myself having the same feelings towards people who spend 60 dollars on a pair of TOM'S just so they can be hip or claim that they're charitable. It's not true charity, but a poor, self-gratifying version of it.

Please don't take it that I am against the principles that Invisible Children or TOM'S are built upon, as both are trying to make positive influences on the world, because I'm not. I'm just sick of seeing people feigning charity to either put themselves on a podium or to become "cool" or "hip." There are so many other and better ways for people to directly help those in need. For example, last year, my friends and I raised $5000 dollars to put a clean drinking well in an overseas village through Charity: Water. You could buy mosquito nets to help stop the malaria pandemic in Africa. You could raise money to buy a child's freedom out of India's human trafficking network. You could sponsor an overseas child and give him food and schooling for around a dollar a day. I'm meeting with my same friends next month to research how to potentially start a "pass back" program to Africa for used soccer equipment... There are endless ways of directly helping those in need, if you actually want to make a difference yourself. The problem is that when real charity is done, it doesn't show up in a slickly cut documentary on your facebook wall or allow you to wear the coolest new clothing to show off to your friends.

Yes, the Ugandan war is horrifying and should be stopped. But buying "action kits" with minimalistic typography posters and tri-cotton blend t-shirts isn't my definition of helping.

I'm not doing this to be "cool". I'm doing this because 30,000 children have been abducted, raped or killed. Sometimes all three.

I'm also not denying there are people like that in the movement, but saying that everyone involved is just a hipster showing off to their friends is ignorant.

On your final paragraph: no one is dumb enough to think that putting up posters and slapping bumper stickers on our Priuses is going to stop the conflict or catch Kony. The whole point of the Kony 2012 movement is to make him famous, let people know about him and the atrocities he has committed, so that there's public outcry to get him.

Yes, this is by no means perfect. But is sitting on our asses in blissful ignorance any better?

I think the point is there are more effective ways of providing Africans assistance to help themselves.

I'm not sure I really agree with that though. Sure, in theory there are better ideas, but what's the practicality of a lot of them? I'll use one example of a guy CNN reported on a few months ago (I'll look for a link in a bit). He went over With his church group to the Sudan, and after they left due to the extreme violence, he married a local woman and stayed to help. CNN interviewed him and he basically said that he had been living in a cave with these people, hadn't seen the light of day in months, and was constantly in fear that he was going to die. Now like I said, doing things such as going over to Africa and helping sound like such a noble idea, but there are cases where they actually do more harm than good. Now instead of being this great volunteer, this guy is huddling in a cave with the rest of them, putting even more of a burden on the tribe he's with to find food and survive.

And even donating money to organizations such as the Red Cross can be problematic because of the possibility that their resources, meant for the starving people, end up being overtaken by violent militia groups.

And sure, there are other things you can do, but what makes them essentially better than this campaign?

I think a lot of people misinterpret the motivation (at least the central motivation) of awareness raising campaigns, and as well underestimate their power. Sure you'll get the idiot hipsters who do this for crazy egotistical and selfish purposes, but you see that in every organization that has large numbers. Believe me, the intent is as altruistic as it can get.

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I think the point is there are more effective ways of providing Africans assistance to help themselves.

Which is true with most charities. When investigating who to donate to one should see what percentage of every dollar donated goes directly to the cause and what percentage goes to "administrative costs".

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I think the point is there are more effective ways of providing Africans assistance to help themselves.

Which is true with most charities. When investigating who to donate to one should see what percentage of every dollar donated goes directly to the cause and what percentage goes to "administrative costs".

http://pastebin.com/Ku2Hw7W0

2) Invisible children's tax returns (http://www.mediafire.com/?6rc8w1nlaba8gkw) out of 7.8 milliona total of 1.5 million went to the country...and there is no record of how that money was distributed

4 million went back to the united states

2 million went to salaries (half a million more then even went to uganda)

the 5 CEO's of the company make $80,000 a year off collections for invisible children

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Whoops. It seems the Mediafire link is broken. I'll look for another source. Those statistics are damning if true.

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Qualifier: Kony is a despicable human being and there is a special ring in hell for people like him.

Now, I'm going to comment on the group behind the "project": Invisible Children. Having interacted with several people who were extremely involved in IC, I have never been so turned off to a 'charity' organization in my life. What a bunch of first-rate, hipster douchebags that love to rub it in your face that they're "charitable". Basically, while the ultimate goal of IC is a noble one; to me the message gets lost between the rockstars and concerts, the new merchline that comes out every 4 months, and the "NEW!!!!!" documentary that comes out every 2 years (during my college years alone there must have been 3-4 documentary/rallies). If I "donate" my money to them, chances are that it's not going to directly help those children, but instead it will help print a t-shirt or send Fall Out Boy on a reunion tour or buy new documentary mixing software... I find myself having the same feelings towards people who spend 60 dollars on a pair of TOM'S just so they can be hip or claim that they're charitable. It's not true charity, but a poor, self-gratifying version of it.

Please don't take it that I am against the principles that Invisible Children or TOM'S are built upon, as both are trying to make positive influences on the world, because I'm not. I'm just sick of seeing people feigning charity to either put themselves on a podium or to become "cool" or "hip." There are so many other and better ways for people to directly help those in need. For example, last year, my friends and I raised $5000 dollars to put a clean drinking well in an overseas village through Charity: Water. You could buy mosquito nets to help stop the malaria pandemic in Africa. You could raise money to buy a child's freedom out of India's human trafficking network. You could sponsor an overseas child and give him food and schooling for around a dollar a day. I'm meeting with my same friends next month to research how to potentially start a "pass back" program to Africa for used soccer equipment... There are endless ways of directly helping those in need, if you actually want to make a difference yourself. The problem is that when real charity is done, it doesn't show up in a slickly cut documentary on your facebook wall or allow you to wear the coolest new clothing to show off to your friends.

Yes, the Ugandan war is horrifying and should be stopped. But buying "action kits" with minimalistic typography posters and tri-cotton blend t-shirts isn't my definition of helping.

I'm not doing this to be "cool". I'm doing this because 30,000 children have been abducted, raped or killed. Sometimes all three.

I'm also not denying there are people like that in the movement, but saying that everyone involved is just a hipster showing off to their friends is ignorant.

On your final paragraph: no one is dumb enough to think that putting up posters and slapping bumper stickers on our Priuses is going to stop the conflict or catch Kony. The whole point of the Kony 2012 movement is to make him famous, let people know about him and the atrocities he has committed, so that there's public outcry to get him.

Yes, this is by no means perfect. But is sitting on our asses in blissful ignorance any better?

I think the point is there are more effective ways of providing Africans assistance to help themselves.

GFB named other organizations, which no doubt are incredibly helpful, good, noble causes, and we should certainly all support them. However, those organizations, while being noble and good, do not directly stop the LRA or help catch Kony, who is among the most wanted international war criminals by The Hague.

If there are better ways to stop Kony, I'm all ears.

Listen, I understand that you are passionate about it, and that's a good thing. There is a lot of heartbreak in this world that needs passionate young people like you and me (obviously, you are not in the "self-gratifying" group I mentioned earlier). However, I can only write about what my personal experience has been dealing with people involved in Invisible Children, and unfortunately, you're in the minority from my point of view.

Also unfortunately, I believe the concerns about how Invisible Children uses their donations are justifiable. If you read the link that in Brass' post, if those numbers are true, and only 32% of all the money spent by Invisible Children went to direct services, then that is extremely poor for a non-profit organization.

My concern for you and others that is getting too caught up in one problem and one organization to take a broader look at the world. Yes, it would be great to bring Kony to justice and make him answer for his crimes against those 30,000 children. However, consider the magnitude of these problems that you yourself can directly help and make an impact right now.

- Nearly one million people die from malaria each year, mostly children younger than five years old. 90% of those deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa.

- Nearly one BILLION people don't have access to safe drinking water. 30,000 people die every week from diseases caused by unsafe drinking water and poor sanitation. 90% of these deaths are children under the age of 5.

- It is estimated that there are at least 1.25 million children trapped in the human trafficking network in India alone.

These are massive problems with often quite simple solutions. Right now, short of Invisible Children taking their $8,000,000 budget and hiring an army of blackwater mercenaries to end this war and free the children, there isn't much that can be done. And it's not like no one is aware that this is going on... Heck, even President Obama has come out and stated that he is a massive proponent of ending the Ugandan war. I think once you get the President of the United States to support you, awareness has already been raised.

I would urge you to think critically about what would really make a bigger difference in the world: for the price of buying one "action kit" through Invisible Children, you could purchase three mosquito nets for a family. crashcarson, instead of your school raising $5000 so Invisible Children can raise more awareness, you could directly provide a village of 250 people with safe drinking water for 20 years and tangibly meet their needs.

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I think the point is there are more effective ways of providing Africans assistance to help themselves.

Which is true with most charities. When investigating who to donate to one should see what percentage of every dollar donated goes directly to the cause and what percentage goes to "administrative costs".

Charity Navigator is a great resource on keeping tabs on non-profit organization spending.

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Well put GFB.

Get yourself a cone at Charlie Browns on me.

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Does it really matter who does it, as long as its done? At least they're getting the word out. The way this has caught fire in the past couple days is amazing.

The real enemy here is Kony, not the charity whose attitude you don't like. I hate to say it, because I dislike condescending charity freaks as much as anyone, but they do to some extent have a right to their pretentiousness. They are doing something about it, for whatever reason they have personally for doing it, they are doing something. Which is more than can be said for a lot of people, myself included.

No cause is without its share of radicals and shallow fake followers, but if in the end the job gets done and we're all better off for it, then does that really matter?

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Donate to Amnesty International instead. They're not just some cause du jour.

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Does it really matter who does it, as long as its done? At least they're getting the word out. The way this has caught fire in the past couple days is amazing.

The issue is there are many ways to help the Invisible Children. In this particular case we know that a very low percentage of donations help the people they are intended for. The problem is they get most of the donations due to their popularity. So a better use of funding for this situation would be to find the charity that sends the highest portion of donated dollars directly to the ones in need.

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Does it really matter who does it, as long as its done? At least they're getting the word out. The way this has caught fire in the past couple days is amazing.

The issue is there are many ways to help the Invisible Children. In this particular case we know that a very low percentage of donations help the people they are intended for. The problem is they get most of the donations due to their popularity. So a better uses of funding for this situation would be to find the charity that sends the highest portion of donated dollars directly to the ones in need.

Understood, but you can't at least acknowledge the work Invisible Children has done to at least get the word out.

People can't help fix something they don't know is happening.

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Does it really matter who does it, as long as its done? At least they're getting the word out. The way this has caught fire in the past couple days is amazing.

The issue is there are many ways to help the Invisible Children. In this particular case we know that a very low percentage of donations help the people they are intended for. The problem is they get most of the donations due to their popularity. So a better uses of funding for this situation would be to find the charity that sends the highest portion of donated dollars directly to the ones in need.

Understood, but you can't at least acknowledge the work Invisible Children has done to at least get the word out.

People can't help fix something they don't know is happening.

Definitely, awareness is never a bad thing, now we need results. When figuring opportunity cost into donating one needs to find the best "bang for the buck" (for the lack of a better term) charity.

To bring a little consumer talk into this, you want the most for your charity dollar.

For example, I never donate based on the intentions of an organization I donate based on their results.

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Well put GFB.

Get yourself a cone at Charlie Browns on me.

Haha! Thanks... I could actually go for one right now. If you wanted to meet me there we could discuss the merits of hitting and scheduling in the NHL. :)

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The whole point of the Kony 2012 movement is to make him famous

Nitpicking here.... but wouldn't you want to make Kony infamous? Famous would imply that he's well-known for positive reasons, which is clearly not the point of this movement. Not trying to be a dick, but I've noticed that one of the taglines for Kony 2012 is "Make Him Famous" and it's really annoying my inner grammar nerd. It could also work against Invisible Children by sending the wrong message, so I guess it's worth pointing out.

Aside from that, I'm rooting for Invisible Children to succeed. I hope Kony is caught and punished without any taxpayer money being spent on ineffective governmental foreign aid and without any unconstitutional wars being started. That would not only save countless Ugandan children from any more torture... it would also help save the rest of us from the current insane climate in regards to foreign policy.

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Does it really matter who does it, as long as its done? At least they're getting the word out. The way this has caught fire in the past couple days is amazing.

The issue is there are many ways to help the Invisible Children. In this particular case we know that a very low percentage of donations help the people they are intended for. The problem is they get most of the donations due to their popularity. So a better use of funding for this situation would be to find the charity that sends the highest portion of donated dollars directly to the ones in need.

One thing that I think gets overlooked in this is just how difficult and expensive it is to legally fund a charity organization like this. In a lot of cases with even non profit organizations, the majority of the funding has to go to back into the charity in order to keep it afloat. I'm not saying their setup is perfect by any means, no charity is, but it's extremely expensive to collect the resources necessary to run a campaign as big as this one, especially when the focus is something as overlooked as the problems in Africa. And I'm not going to even touch on the salaries of the CEO's, because frankly I don't know what their job consists of or how much personal effort they put into their work. I will say this though, a lot of times when it comes to charities and you see someone making a large salary, it's because they've been brought in specifically because they're damn good at what they do, and warrant a high salary. On the surface it may seem sketchy, but if they're someone who has a great history of organizing things and even though they make a lot, the amount that they can bring into the charity is often times tenfold what they make and a ton more would come to the charity than if they weren't there.

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