Veras

History of a Fictional Football League (1985 Postseason - 40th Victory Bowl)

Recommended Posts

Veras    411

1985 Quarterfinals

 

85r2g1cinvsbos_by_verasthebrujah-dbjqajc

 

Early on, it looked as though Cincinnati’s postseason woes might continue.  The offense struggled to get anything going, while the defense repeatedly allowed the Captains to approach the very edge of field goal range before coming up with a stop.  As a result, the Guardians spent much of the early part of the game with their backs to the end zone, though Boston was only able to put up 6 points in the first quarter on field goals of 55 and 31 yards by Ralph Steffan.

 

The Guardians answered with a 38-yarder of their own 5 minutes into the second quarter.  Neither team scored again in the remainder of the half – though Boston came close.  On the final play before halftime, Ralph Steffan (who was known more for pinpoint accuracy than for power) attempted a 62-yard field goal, which fell short of the crossbar by inches.

 

The skies cleared in the second half, and as the weather warmed up, so too did the potent Cincinnati offense.  The Guardians took the lead on the first drive of the third when RB Jim Hill slipped through the line for a 3-yard touchdown.  Boston had a good chance to get back in front with 4 minutes remaining in the quarter after FS Jim Hubbard knocked the ball free from Reggie Hart’s hand at the Cincinnati 43.  However, the offense went 3 and out, losing 7 yards in the process, and were forced to punt.  Rhys Scott pinned the Guardians inside the 1-yard line, but Hart atoned for his turnover by leading a 99-yard touchdown drive, which ended with Jim Hill’s second touchdown run of the day.

 

The Guardians started their next drive deep in Boston territory, but the offense was once again spectacular.  A little over 6 minutes later, Reggie Hart capped off a 93-yard drive by scrambling into the end zone from 7 yards out, putting his team up 24-6.

 

The Captains found the end zone for the first time of the day with 3:29 on the clock when Cliffe found TE Elliot Hayes in the corner of the end zone from 5 yards out.  Hoping to make it a 10-point game, the Captains went for 2, but All-Pro DT Andrew Gray forced his way into the backfield, levelling RB Russell Fraizer a split second after he took the handoff.

 

The onside kick failed, and the Guardians sealed the deal with a field goal in the game’s final minute.  Their 27-12 win means that they are now one game away from the Victory Bowl for the first time in over 30 years.

 

85r2g2atlvshou_by_verasthebrujah-dbjqajh

This game went much as expected.  The Atlanta defense was simply too much for Houston as they picked off Tom Hudson 4 times and recovered a fumble.  Midway through the 1st quarter, it looked like the Hurricanes had a chance – trailing 3-0, CB Myron Slaughter picked off Wesley Marx in the end zone, seizing momentum and deflating the home crowd.  However, just two plays later, the Rebels nabbed their second interception of the day, and brought the ball back to the Houston 15.  Two plays after that, Marx hit TE Lee Flynn in the end zone.

 

The Hurricanes once again showed a flicker of life early in the second quarter when rookie RB Matt Cotton dove into the end zone from 2 yards out, which made the score 13-7, but the Rebels went on to score 20 unanswered points and record two more takeaways over the next 22 minutes.  By the time the Hurricanes found the end zone again early in the 4th, the score was 33-14, and they had little hope of a comeback.  Indeed, the Rebels would effectively erase that touchdown, just a few minutes later.  CB Rick Roudebush grabbed his third pick of the day, and set the Rebels up with a short field.  3 minutes later, RB James Brody scored for the third time of the day (2 rushing, 1 receiving).  The score would hold at 40-14, and Roudebush and Brody shared player of the game honors.

 

85r2g3clevscol_by_verasthebrujah-dbjqajl

The Ghosts and Cents have what is quickly becoming one of the best non-divisional rivalries in the AFA, and that was obvious from very early on.  On Colorado’s first possession, SS John Bow came on a safety blitz and laid out QB Frankie Farragut (his former teammate) with a helmet-to-helmet hit.  Farragut fumbled, LB Charlie White recovered, and no flag was thrown.  From there, pushing rarely stopped at the whistle, and both teams would be flagged for unnecessary roughness more than once.

 

Riding a wave of adrenaline, the Cents jumped out to a 10 point lead as Michael Lawrence connected on a 30-yard field goal and Tom Blitz pounded his way into the end zone from 5 yards out in the waning minute of the first quarter.  Defense dominated the second quarter, and the only points of the period came when Cleveland QB Therron Nikoloudis took the ball in from 10 yards out on a bootleg with 23 seconds to play in the half.

 

Throughout the third and at the beginning of the fourth quarters, the Ghosts kept catching up, only to fall behind again.  A Kevin Rubin interception at the Colorado 38 set up a field goal 7 minutes into the second half, tying the game at 10.  Six minutes later, Colorado reclaimed the lead when TE Michael Meek took a short pass into the end zone from 8 yards out.  However, less than 3 minutes into the fourth quarter, Jose Ortuno trucked LB Paulie May on his way into the end zone, knotting things up at 17.

 

With 6 minutes remaining, Cleveland LB Ronald Tate made a spectacular, diving interception on an attempted screen pass to Tom Blitz, giving the Ghosts possession at the Colorado 46.  Their power run game worked to perfection, and two minutes later, Jose Ortuno powered into the end zone for the second time of the quarter, giving Cleveland their first lead of the day.

 

It would be enough.  The Cents advanced into Cleveland territory, but went no further.  Facing 4th and 5 from the 46 just before the two minute warning, and not wanting to give the ball back to the time-chewing Ortuno, they elected to go for it.  Frankie Farragut had an open man, but hesitated on the throw, allowing DT Keith Barry to drag him down for the sack.  Taking over at the Colorado 49, the Ghosts managed to run out the clock, advancing to the semifinals for the third time in four years with a 24-17 victory.

 

85r2g4calvssd_by_verasthebrujah-dbjqajs.

The first quarter was largely uneventful, with the only points coming on the first and last plays of the quarter.  The game opened with a 98-yard kickoff return by San Diego’s Michael Potts, and 15 minutes later, California RB Hank Albert tied the game up at 7 with a 3 yard touchdown rush.  The tie held for most of the second quarter, until Steve Parker hit WR Gary MacKey down the sideline for a 17 yard touchdown to put the Whales up 14-7 with four minutes on the clock.  San Diego’s launched what started as a very successful drive, advancing to the California 23 without even facing a third down.  Unfortunately, the drive abruptly stalled, and they were forced to kick a field goal, sending the game into halftime with California up 14-10.

 

San Diego’s first drive of the third quarter also resulted in a field goal (in fact, the kick came from almost the exact same spot), which cut the deficit to 1.  However, the Whales scored a few minutes later on a QB sneak by Parker, extending their lead to 21-13.  The two teams traded field goals at the beginning of the 4th, so the 8-point margin held as time ran down.

 

Eventually, the Destroyers got the ball back at their own 14 with 2:17 to play and two timeouts.  The offense found their form, converting on third down three times as they pushed deep into California territory.  With just 36 seconds to play, Walter Dodd hit WR Willie Borrow on a fade for a touchdown, to put the score at 24-22.  On the two point conversion, Dodd faked the handoff to the fullback, and threw to Randy Klein on a swing route.  Klein’s path to the end zone was clear – nobody was going to be able to stop him – but he took his eye off the ball.  It bounced off his hands, and fell harmlessly to the turf.  The Destroyers actually managed to recover the onside kick, but it did them no good.  They simply didn’t have enough time to move into field goal range, and the Whales are one win away from returning to the Victory Bowl.

 

1985_afa_postseason_bracket_by_verastheb

 

AFA Magazine Semifinals Preview

 

Atlanta Rebels vs Cleveland Ghosts

 

This is a matchup between two teams that are very good at playing with the lead.  Both defenses are very good against the pass, and both offenses are designed to run time off the clock, so it’s likely that even a two-score deficit will be insurmountable.  Consequently, it is imperative that both teams get off to a good start.  Despite Atlanta’s superior record, the Ghosts are actually the favorites here.  Jose Ortuno adds a dimension to the Cleveland offense that the Rebels just can’t hope to match, and he has been absolutely unstoppable in January over the past two seasons.  The Ghosts will get the chance to defend their title in New Orleans.  Cleveland, 17-14.

 

Guardians of Cincinnati vs California Whales

 

Ten years ago, nobody would have dreamed that these two teams could meet in a semifinals game.  They were arguably the two worst teams of the 1970s (the Whales even ceased to exist at one point), but here they are.  On paper the Guardians are the better team, but then, on paper the Guardians are better than everybody for a few years, and they’ve still made early exits in the postseason.  The difference between the two is that this Whales team has been to the Victory Bowl and the Guardians haven’t.  If California wins this game, it will be because they keep their composure while Cincinnati crumbles.  This one should be a thriller, with California stealing the win 24-23.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Red Comet    30

All the home teams won this round! That's new! Loving that Cleveland-Colorado is becoming an 80's rivalry like real life.

 

Rebs bust the Ghosts 

 

Guardians finally reach their potential and beat the Whales soundly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Veras    411

It's been long enough that I no longer remember who made the request, but I finally updated the stadiums map.

 

As far as I can tell, there is no way for me to add a key, so I'll just offer a reminder here:

 

The yellowish green means natural grass, the blue green means artificial turf.  I doubt that you'll be able to see the inactive stadiums (I made the layer invisible because they kept blocking the stadiums that are currently in use), but grey means that a stadium is still standing but no longer home to an AFA team, while black means that the stadium has been demolished.

 

A square is an outdoor stadium, a circle is an indoor stadium, and a diamond has a retractable roof.

 

On 8/10/2017 at 11:01 AM, officerpain138 said:

Well I know I am a little late to the party, but the Imperials and Sharks are frustrating the hell out of me! How does Boston win the division? At least Pittsburgh tanked.

 

The San Diego game was interesting. I am hoping they can come up with a New York Giants style run to a VB victory! 

 

The VB logo is decent, I would have hoped something more New Orleans style. But it is kind of early for that. Super Bowl logos in the 80's weren't very personal to the host city and were mostly red, white and blue. 

 

I'm looking ahead a bit but for the 40th anniversary, any plans for teams to wear throwbacks from 46? I think it'd be great to see Cincy wear their 46 uniforms! 

Yeah, New York in particular has been really disappointing.  Ron Adams still arguably the best QB in the league, and the team is absolutely failing him.  The defense is an even mix of guys who are very good and guys who shouldn't be starting in the AFA, but Adams gets no help on offense.  The line can't protect him, the backfield is the epitome of average, and he doesn't have a great arsenal of pass-catchers.  Rookie Martin Huntley showed a lot of potential until he broke his tibia in week 5, and at age 32, Richard Braatz isn't a top-tier threat anymore.  His most reliable target was probably TE Elliot MacLellan, who is pretty average.

 

They were 9-7 this year.  If Adams hadn't played, they probably would have won 3 or 4 games.  He's going to be 34 next year, so his career will wind down before too much longer (though he has been remarkably consistent over the past few season).  If they're going to win a title with him under center, they need Huntley and a few other young guys on offense to step up right now.

 

There won't be any throwbacks for the 40th season (though the 11 surviving founding teams did wear 40th season patches this year).  Throwbacks will probably happen for the 50th season, which will be in 1995.  I'm definitely looking forward to the Guardians throwbacks more than most.  I think they will be the AFA's equivalent of the bumblebee jerseys.

 

25 minutes ago, Red Comet said:

All the home teams won this round! That's new! Loving that Cleveland-Colorado is becoming an 80's rivalry like real life.

 

Rebs bust the Ghosts 

 

Guardians finally reach their potential and beat the Whales soundly.

It's only the second time that all four home teams have won in the quarterfinals since the playoffs expanded beyond four teams in 1966 (the first was 1972).

 

Interesting picks.  You're going against the magazine on both!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Red Comet    30
44 minutes ago, Veras said:

It's only the second time that all four home teams have won in the quarterfinals since the playoffs expanded beyond four teams in 1966 (the first was 1972).

 

Interesting picks.  You're going against the magazine on both!

 

It seems like usually whatever the magazine says is usually the reverse of what happens until this year so far.

 

Or, I could be wrong on both ends and we get a rematch of last year's Victory Bowl. Either way it's great!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
willmoen    37

I'm glad that you have an updated Stadium Map. It is cool to see where each team would play within their respective cities. I have a question about it though. Is there any process behind where each stadium is located within each city or is it random? Also, I'm going for a battle of Ohio Victory Bowl with Cleveland and Cincinnati winning in the semis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KittSmith_95    610

My brain says Ghosts V Guardians VB. My heart says Rebels V Whales VB. We'll see what happens, but both games will be fun. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BengalSteve    4

Finally, the Guardians don't lay an egg in the playoffs for once! A Ghosts-Guardians Victory Bowl sounds intriguing, but I have no preference for an opponent as long as Cincy wins it all! B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Magic Dynasty    409

I was expecting Boston to pull it off, but oh well. Interesting that the Wasps play in Silver Spring, MD, less than a mile (it looks like) from DC proper, as well as the Crows playing in KCKS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Red Comet    30
9 hours ago, Magic Dynasty said:

I was expecting Boston to pull it off, but oh well. Interesting that the Wasps play in Silver Spring, MD, less than a mile (it looks like) from DC proper, as well as the Crows playing in KCKS.

 

Noticed that too, particularly the latter. From what I know about that area where the Kanter Dome is, it was blighted by the 90's at the latest and with the lease running out in 2001, that could become an issue threatening the team's existence in Kansas City if the Crows don't get a winning tradition going. If there is a new stadium in Kansas City, the downtown area was still a sea of parking lots and abandoned buildings until about 2005 so it would make sense to build the new stadium where the Power and Light district is today.

 

EDIT: Scratch that, awful idea. If the Crows have even a fraction of the tailgating tradition the Chiefs have, the West Bottoms or the area where the Truman Sports Complex is now would be a much better site for a new stadium. A lot of available area so that you can not only build the stadium, you can also have a large parking lot too. Reason: No mass transit in Kansas City.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well that SD game was a classic! I was hoping for the Destroyers to win, but what can you do? I'm hoping for a Cin/Atl VB with a Cin victory!
 

Any ideas of what NY will be looking for in the draft? And where is the VB next season?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Veras    411
21 hours ago, Red Comet said:

 

It seems like usually whatever the magazine says is usually the reverse of what happens until this year so far.

 

Or, I could be wrong on both ends and we get a rematch of last year's Victory Bowl. Either way it's great!

I actually think that all of the potential matchups are pretty good this year.  If Cleveland wins, it sets up either a Victory Bowl rematch or the first intrastate (and intradivisional) Victory Bowl.  If Atlanta wins, then the Victory Cup will go to a franchise that has never before won the title.

 

21 hours ago, willmoen said:

I'm glad that you have an updated Stadium Map. It is cool to see where each team would play within their respective cities. I have a question about it though. Is there any process behind where each stadium is located within each city or is it random? Also, I'm going for a battle of Ohio Victory Bowl with Cleveland and Cincinnati winning in the semis.

I do put some thought into where the stadiums are located, but the difficulty of gathering the necessary information to pick the perfect location means that there is some element of randomization.  The biggest problem is that it's just hard to know what the socioeconomic conditions of various neighborhoods in these cities were like decades ago.  To use the Bobcats as an example - I didn't want to put the stadium in the same place as Tampa Stadium/Raymond James Stadium.  After scrolling around on Google Maps, I found where I-4 and I-275 come together, near the Selmon Expressway.  It's near the waterfront, which is a cool place for a stadium, and then I noticed both the convention center and Amalie Arena.  I looked at the wikipedia pages for both, and found that "the [area] was used for various industrial and commercial purposes until the late 1980s, when it was cleared to make way for a new convention center to replace Tampa's aging Curtis Hixon Hall."  The Bobcats stadium was built in 1977, ten years too early.  That was close enough that I could plausibly say that the revitalization effort in the AFA Universe took place a decade earlier, and the stadium was built as a predecessor to the convention center.

 

11 hours ago, Red Comet said:
11 hours ago, Magic Dynasty said:

I was expecting Boston to pull it off, but oh well. Interesting that the Wasps play in Silver Spring, MD, less than a mile (it looks like) from DC proper, as well as the Crows playing in KCKS.

Noticed that too, particularly the latter. From what I know about that area where the Kanter Dome is, it was blighted by the 90's at the latest and with the lease running out in 2001, that could become an issue threatening the team's existence in Kansas City if the Crows don't get a winning tradition going. If there is a new stadium in Kansas City, the downtown area was still a sea of parking lots and abandoned buildings until about 2005 so it would make sense to build the new stadium where the Power and Light district is today.

I described my thought process for Tampa above, which was a bit more complicated than for the Wasps or Crows.

 

I wanted the Wasps to be somewhere on the northern part of 495, and as I looked around, I noticed that Silver Spring met that requirement.  I'm vaguely aware of it's existence because 1) it's Lewis Black's hometown and I'm a big fan, and 2) the town of Springvale in Fallout 3 is a reference to Silver Spring.  Good enough for me.

 

The real reason that I put the Kanter Dome on the west side of the state line is that no big 4 team plays their home games in Kansas in real life.  A quick glance at the 1990 census showed that something like 1/4 of the metro population lived in Kansas, which, assuming that KCKS is basically the west side (and I don't know if that's a valid assumption), is pretty much what you would expect.  In universe, the reason would be that Kanter preferred to pay Kansas taxes over Missouri taxes.  I made that decision well before I actually mapped the stadium, but the proximity to downtown and the convergence of I-70 and I-670 made it a pretty easy pick.

 

I didn't know that the area was blighted (I've never even been to KC), but I definitely will include that information in the story as their lease expires.  IIRC, there was a similar problem at one point with the Cowboys at the Cotton Bowl in Dallas?

 

EDIT:  Didn't see your response until after I posted

2 hours ago, officerpain138 said:

Well that SD game was a classic! I was hoping for the Destroyers to win, but what can you do? I'm hoping for a Cin/Atl VB with a Cin victory!
 

Any ideas of what NY will be looking for in the draft? And where is the VB next season?

 

Since they're drafting in the middle of the pack, it's hard to guess specifically who the Imperials will take, but their biggest needs are at OL, RB, WR, ILB, and OLB.  Since they used their top pick a year ago on a wideout, their ideal choice would probably be to grab a RB or OT in round 1, but it obviously depends who is left on the board.  They pick 18th, and looking at the pool, there is a lot more first round talent available at RB, WR, and LB than at OL.

 

As for the VB next year - as a matter of fact, your character will be hosting it.  Against all odds, the Futuredome has been chosen to host VB41, while 42 return to the Rose Bowl.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Predicting an all Ohio Victory Bowl, but just hoping Cincy can keep it close!

 

(You can be a fan of two teams in the same division...right?) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Veras    411

85r3g1atlvscle_by_verasthebrujah-dbjy7is

As expected, this game was tight all day.  Atlanta got on the board first on a 3-yard run by RB James Brodie, but Jose Ortuno tied it up for the Ghosts by leaping the line from 1-yard out with a minute remaining in the first.

 

Atlanta put together a strong drive early in the second, advancing well into Cleveland territory, but they came away with nothing after a poor throw by Wesley Marx was picked off by CB Walter Radix.  Nevertheless, the Rebels would break the tie just before the two minute warning with a 48-yard field goal.  The Cleveland offense then went 3 and out, apparently giving the Rebels one more minute to put points on the board before the half.  However, punt returner William Wigglesworth muffed the ball.  It took a one-in-a-million bounce and hit Cleveland gunner Keith Burgess in the chest, who didn’t even break stride as he caught the ball.  He blew past Wigglesworth before the returner even realized what was happening, and danced his way into the end zone, allowing Cleveland to go into halftime with a 14-10 lead.

 

A field goal 5 minutes into the third extended Cleveland’s lead to a touchdown, but the Rebels tied it up at 17 when Brodie took a screen pass 56 yard to the house with a minute and a half remaining in the third.  From there, the game was all Atlanta.  On their next possession, they retook the lead on a 5 yard touchdown pass from Marx to TE Lee Flynn.  An interception by Rick Roudebush deep in Cleveland territory set up a field goal, giving the Rebels what would prove to be an insurmountable 10-point lead with 2:25 to play.

 

The defending champions will watch the Victory Bowl from their couches, while the Atlanta Rebels will go to the big game for the first time in their 17-year history.

 

85r3g2cinvscal_by_verasthebrujah-dbjy7jd

The game’s opening drive ended in a touchdown with an 8-yard Reggie Hart touchdown scramble (on a play in which he nearly juked LB Van Tellis out of his shoes).  They truly seized control later in the quarter, however, when they put up 10 points in a minute and three seconds.  It started with a 31-yard field goal.  On California’s first play from scrimmage after the kickoff, LG Denny Davalos drew a 15-yard personal foul for throwing a late hit, which backed the Whales up to their own 7.  LB B.B. Bedini stripped RB Hank Albert of the following play, and DE Benny Cerutti recovered at the 5.  Two plays later, RB Jim Hill pounded it into the end zone to give Cincinnati a 17-0 advantage.

 

California fought back in the second, pushing into Cincinnati territory early in the quarter, only to see their drive fall apart when a pass was tipped at the line by DT Andrew Gray and intercepted by LB Richard Zwetzig.  The Whales did manage find the end zone 5 minutes later on a 7-yard pass from Steve Parker to Hank Albert, but Reggie Hart threw a 10-yard touchdown to TE Vic Meredith on the ensuing possession, allowing the Guardians to maintain a 17-point lead at the half.

 

The third quarter was hotly contested.  After California was forced to punt on the first possession of the quarter, the next four drives resulted in points.  Jim Hill made it into the end zone again to extend Cincinnati’s lead to 31-7, but the Whales immediately answered with a touchdown pass from Parker to WR Steve Tierney.  The Guardians would then settle for a field goal, and the Whales cut into their lead when Steve Albert picked up his first rushing touchdown of the day.

 

Early in the fourth, the Whales connected on a 36-yard field goal to put the score at 34-24.  With 8:58 to play, and facing the smallest deficit that they had seen since the game’s 11th minute, the California sideline suddenly believed that they would complete the comeback.  This optimism was crushed, however, when Reggie Hart led an 80-yard touchdown drive that burned more than 5 minutes off the clock.  By the time it ended with Hart rushing 6 yards into the end zone (interestingly on the exact same play on which he had scored in the first), the Guardians held a 41-24 lead and only 3:50 remained on the clock.

 

Neither team would score again, which means that the Guardians earned the right to play in their first Victory Bowl in 31 years.

 

1985_afa_postseason_bracket_by_verastheb

 

AFA Magazine Victory Bowl Preview

 

This will be the first time in a decade that the top two teams will face off in the Victory Bowl, and it is definitely an interesting matchup.  Atlanta has a typical, fairly well-rounded offense.  Their receiving corps is perhaps a bit below average, but they’re good (not great) everywhere else on offense.  The Cincinnati defense has a good front 7, anchored by superstar DT Andrew Gray.  Their secondary is average, maybe a bit below, so the two teams are pretty even when Atlanta has the ball.

 

Things get interesting when it is going the other way.  Atlanta’s defense is very good, particularly in the secondary.  Rick Roudebush and Tim Febbraio are arguably the best CB tandem in the history of the league, but Cincinnati’s offense, led by a trio known as the Three Musketeers, is virtually unstoppable.  Any one of these three would start in just about any city in the league – Reggie Hart is one of the top two QBs in the AFA; Jim Hill probably ranks behind only Tom Blitz (COL) and Jose Ortuno (CLE) at RB; and Vic Meredith is easily the best TE in the league, and would be among the top 5 or 10 if he were counted as a wideout.  These teams don’t play often, so it is difficult to say how the Rebels will try to stop the Musketeers.  They will likely assign Roudebush or Febbraio to Meredith, but they simply don’t have a linebacker with the speed to spy Hart, and the more guys they put on him, the more room Jim Hill will have to work with.  If they don’t find a way to keep him contained, he could have a field day.

 

Cincinnati’s offense will be too much.  Guardians win 35-27.

 

This is Atlanta’s first Victory Bowl.  The Guardians have been to four, losing all of them.  They lost to the New York Imperials in each of the first three, by scores of 24-13, 20-17, and 34-31 (which is still the highest-scoring title game in AFA history), respectively.  They also lost to the Boston Captains in the 9th Victory Bowl, 19-13.  This will be the first Victory Bowl since 1959 in which neither participant has ever won a championship.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jimmy Lethal    239

Y'know, I'm starting to wonder if the Rebels' name will eventually reach Redskins tier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Red Comet    30

Rebels versus Guardians and it'll be in New Orleans. At the time, the city was about half black and half white. Bringing in a team rife with Confederate imagery is going to be interesting in the Chinese sense. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now