Veras

History of a Fictional Football League (1990 New Jersey Sharks)

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On 7/26/2017 at 11:04 PM, BellaSpurs said:

 

Good point, guess I overlooked that fact. But will the ever get a classic logo update like Boston or New York? There's more to work with there. Or is there current logo set in stone.

I'm definitely not married to their current logo.  It was one of the first (maybe the very first?) human face logo that I did, so it definitely has room for improvement.  They're a team, much like the Dragons, that I've always had a hard time with.  I doubt that they'll get anything that's radically different, though.  I considered doing something like the Pittsburgh Maulers logo, but I could never get it to work without it being basically identical.

 

On 7/26/2017 at 11:45 PM, rjrrzube said:

Maybe they make that regrettable move, like the Detroit Pistons, and go with '90s colors. Or maybe they add teal, then wipe it out by 2000 and pretend like it never happened. 

That's definitely not going to happen.  There may be a few teams that adopt something kind of wild in the 1990s, but Pittsburgh absolutely won't.  They've been so incredibly successful for so long that they will always be one of the most traditional teams in the league.

 

On 7/28/2017 at 4:58 PM, FDW said:

 

Uhh, I don't want to sound too mean here. But I just, don't, like the Eagle's midnight green look at all. It hasn't looked remotely appealing to me in any of the forms it's been presented in. To me, The Dragons are a team that should look very flamboyant, outrageous. Their current look is too close what The Whales and Grizzlies have, which is why I was never a fan of it.

 

Still, I'm at least glad things seem to be finally turning around for the team itself. I'm eager for the 1985 season.

 

Also, the Google Drive site seems to be working on my end.

I'm not sure if they'll go that direction or not, but what I was thinking isn't anything like what the Eagles have.  Their current primary color (or at least something closely resembling it) would be the dominant color, with dark and light green as accents.

 

I haven't really played with it yet, given that their current look is still pretty new, but it's just something that I'm going to keep in mind.

 

On 7/30/2017 at 8:05 AM, officerpain138 said:

All the uniform updates look good. The update for the Wolves looks good. Not a dramatic change, just enough. I would really like to see them get a new logo in the future. Maybe a wolfs head. The color scheme I would leave alone, it is unlike any other team in the league.

The Wolves will definitely get a logo update at some point, but probably not until the late 1990s or early 2000s.  Even though their success broke their resemblance to the Buccaneers that I was going for, I still think that they'll still mirror that superficial part of the team's history.

 

On 7/30/2017 at 0:43 PM, ChicagoOakland said:

I feel like the Wolves may end up being one of those teams that goes BFBS for some reason.

I really doubt it, unless they do the full 90s thing that @rjrrzube suggested for Pittsburgh.  They would do something like go black and teal, and then return to their traditional colors maybe 8-10 years later.

 

22 hours ago, nick_crenshaw82 said:

Happy Birthday Veras.

Thanks.  It was actually a pretty rough day - the baby has pneumonia, which is also why I haven't posted in a few days.  But he's doing much better now, other than the fact that he strenuously objects to taking his medicine.

 

6 hours ago, JD1500 said:

I've been following this incredible series from afar for some time now but felt I needed to wait until it progressed until the mid-80s before commenting.  Actually, it just turned out that way because I was lazy.  In any case, the recent uniform updates are splendid, especially that Milwaukee set.  That is one unique looking uniform, while retaining some traditional elements the way I feel a team from Milwaukee should. 

 

A few random questions if you'll indulge me:

 

I saw a few people ask recently who would be the AFA universe's counterparts to the Cowboys and Steelers, national teams with huge followings.  What about the flip side?  Who's the least talked about team(s) on a year-to-year basis?  My vote would be for Atlanta.

 

Are any divisional realignments possible in the near term?  I only ask because as an Imperials sympathizer, it would be nice for a 10-6 record to at least get you third place!  It seems like that division is always stacked.

 

Do you happen to have a cumulative records to date database -regular season and playoffs- available for each franchise? 

 

Lastly, any logo updates planned for my twenty-third favorite team, Baltimore?

 

Oh, and those Google Drive links are working perfectly...thanks again for your ongoing efforts!

Welcome aboard!

 

The team that comes to my mind as the most ignored is definitely Philadelphia.  They used to be in Pittsburgh, where they were so bad that most locals actually supported the then Wheeling Miners over them.  After moving to Philly, they've pretty consistently been bad.  The only time that they've ever been taken seriously as Victory Bowl contenders was 1959, when they lost to Cleveland, and their one Victory Bowl title (1973) was unquestionably a fluke.  Atlanta isn't a bad choice, though they've been considered a team on the verge of a breakthrough for most of this decade.  Houston is also worth consideration - there have been points in the team's history at which they've been good, but nothing has ever come of it.  Now, between their historic drubbing at the hands of the Miners in the 1976 Victory Bowl and the success that the Stallions have had in recent years, it's kind of hard not to see them as a joke.

 

Realignment isn't on the horizon, with the possible exception of a few minor adjustments.  Baltimore, Philly, and Portland are all possible candidates for relocation, and if any of those come to pass, it may be possible to make some changes (particularly if one is to move across the country, like Portland going to Buffalo or Baltimore going to Oakland).  The next expansion, which is probably 5-10 years away, will bring each division to 5 members, with the North and South still at 4.  If the two new teams fit nicely into those slots (say, Indianapolis and San Antonio), then things will probably be the same.  If not, a few teams may slide around.  There won't be a major realignment until the league expands to 32 teams.

 

I don't have a cumulative database.  I did at one point, but it's way out of date now.  I really need to rebuild it - 40 seasons in it is now incredibly difficult to check things like "Boston hasn't won a division title since 1954," plus I want to be able to quickly compare all-time records between teams.  However, putting it together in a way that I want to is going to be a tremendous pain in the ass, so I keep putting it off.

 

Finally - yes, I have a new logo in mind for the Royals.  In fact, I accidentally posted a rough draft of the team's next uniform update on Google Drive, which @Red Comet noticed and kindly pointed it out to me (thanks again, btw).  They will probably change their look (possibly radically) when their stadium situation is resolved, one way or the other.

 

34 minutes ago, Magic Dynasty said:

Um... you said that the Dragons' owner died in April of 2015.

Wait... I thought years ending in 5 were the same in every decade?

 

Thanks for pointing it out.  Naturally, I meant 1985, and I've corrected it above.

 

16 minutes ago, b0ss pls said:

I see an expansion in possibly in the near future. Indianapolis and New Mexico, perhaps? 

Indy has to be a strong candidate.  Based on a quick glance, only two media markets were larger in 1985 and didn't have a team (Hartford-New Haven and Sacramento-Stockton), and both of those are very close to other markets.  New Mexico is probably a longshot.  Albuquerque and Santa Fe were in the same media market, which was the 64th largest in the country.  I haven't even done preliminary research yet, but Nashville and Charlotte (@RightGuard I was actually typing this when you replied) jump out at me as strong contenders.  Orlando, Sacramento, and Connecticut could also have a shot, though the proximity to other markets (and economic concerns for the latter) may hurt their bids.

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I think Portland will rebrand under the new buyer or possibly move to somewhere like San Francisco or Sacramento

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19 minutes ago, ChicagoOakland said:

Welp, Portland is screwed.

 

Who's the new man in charge in San Diego?

Don't know how, but I didn't see the question in your reply before.

 

Given the number of vacancies this year, many teams, including the Destroyers, kind of had to reach for a head coach.  They ended up settling on Keith Shepherd, who was most recently the quarterback coach in Philadelphia (despite the team's lack of success, John LeBell is actually one of the best young QBs in the league, and he credits Shepherd as a major factor in his success).  At 34 years old, he will be the youngest head man in the league, with Arizona's Jerry Danko (38) the only other one under the age of 40.

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Another intriguing offseason, that's for sure! Although I was wondering about a few things: 

 

1. Who owns the Bobcats now that Bill Trotter has passed away? If it's a family member, then what's his/her name?

 

2. If the Dragons do end up moving, where are some potential landing spots for them? And if Portland receives another team through expansion one day, will they retain the Dragons' name, or will they have a new name to distance themselves from Zachary Delvin?

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On 8/1/2017 at 5:14 PM, Veras said:

The debate over a stadium in Baltimore took a dramatic turn when the city’s baseball team, the Baltimore Bishops, relocated to Phoenix, Arizona, in January, dramatically leaving Baltimore in the dead of night in a fleet of Swift Transportation trucks.  State and local officials had previously believed that they would be able to keep both the Royals and the Bishops in the city without constructing a new stadium.  The shock of the Bishops’ departure jolted public opinion in favor of a new stadium, and negotiations began to make real progress for the first time.  Still, nothing is set in stone, and the Royals lease expires at the end of the 1986 season.

 

Delicious.

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11 hours ago, BengalSteve said:

Another intriguing offseason, that's for sure! Although I was wondering about a few things: 

 

1. Who owns the Bobcats now that Bill Trotter has passed away? If it's a family member, then what's his/her name?

 

2. If the Dragons do end up moving, where are some potential landing spots for them? And if Portland receives another team through expansion one day, will they retain the Dragons' name, or will they have a new name to distance themselves from Zachary Delvin?

 

Control of the Bobcats passed to Trotter's son, Bill, Jr.

 

There are definitely buyers in other cities who are making some serious noise.  Obviously, cities that already have an AFA-ready stadium (or at least one that could serve as a stand-in) have the best chance.  Anaheim, Memphis, and Oklahoma City have college stadiums that could work.  Buffalo Stadium, the former home of the Stampeders, needs some renovation, but is no worse that the Oregon Dome.  Indianapolis has a baseball stadium that is football-ready, and Salt Lake City built a 65,000-seat indoor stadium designed to lure in an AFA team.  They may or may not keep the Dragons name after a move, but they would certainly keep the history.  A new Portland franchise would start from scratch.

 

Obviously, a move isn't set in stone.  Devin isn't actively trying to move the team, he's just looking for the highest bidder.  It's unclear if the league would allow such a move, but it's not implausible.  AFA President Warren Breyer has expressed a desire to keep all franchises where they are, provided that they have acceptable facilities, but the Oregon Dome falls short of the league's requirements.  Specifically, all AFA stadiums must have a seating capacity of at least 50,000.  This rule was adopted in 1972, after the Dragons and Atlanta Rebels joined the league with stadiums that held only 45,000 and 42,816, respectively.  These two stadiums were grandfathered in, and the lease on the Oregon Dome is good through 1998.  So this may be a good way for the league to resolve the issue more than a decade earlier than expected.

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Out of the 3 teams in trouble, which is the most likely to actually move? And I called Buffalo getting a team a while ago so that's what i'm rooting for. If Buffalo does get another team, could they be called the Stamps again or do the Sharks retain the rights to that identity?

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What is the fate of the Dragons franchise, do they rebrand or move?

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On 8/3/2017 at 1:27 PM, b0ss pls said:

What is the fate of the Dragons franchise, do they rebrand or move?

 

This is MY team! This sucks if they leave. :(

 

I do like the Wasps and the Ghosts, though... but Portland, still... 

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The passing of the three owners got me thinking about a certain man on Bourbon Street. How's Dwayne Carp holding up? He's 53 which makes him still a relatively younger owner and likely in good health. Would it also be a good thing to assume he's a pretty respected by players and other owners?

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1985_season_by_verasthebrujah-dbj07bo.jp

 

In a league that generally has a great deal of continuity from season to season, 1985 saw a significant shakeup in the standings, with only the Guardians of Cincinnati and the California Whales repeating as division champions.

 

The Whales finished 11-5 (a franchise best), narrowly beating out the 10-6 San Diego Destroyers thanks to a dramatic, come from behind victory in San Diego in week 15.  The Portland Dragons were also briefly in the playoff hunt, thanks to a record-breaking performance by the passing attack.  Aided by arguably the two best wideouts in the AFA in Thomas McLaurin and Curtis Tyre, QB K.C. Baker recorded 5008 passing yards, becoming the first player in AFA history to top the 5000 yard mark.  Unfortunately, it did the team little good as they stumbled to a 7-9 record thanks to a mediocre rushing attack, weak offensive line, and a soft front 7 (indeed, these factors contributed to Baker’s stellar numbers – he constantly had to throw to keep his team in games).  Nevertheless, this is a massive improvement over their 4-12 campaign a year ago, and shows the phenomenal potential of this squad.

 

The Northern Division was hotly contested for much of the year, though it was clear that the Guardians were the team to beat by Thanksgiving.  They would go on to finish 12-4, which secured them the second seed, and thus, home field advantage throughout the postseason.  This will be an important factor – the team was nearly unstoppable at home, going a perfect 8-0 in the friendly confines of Blakemore Stadium, including victories of more than 21 points against Chicago, Los Angeles, and Seattle.  The Detroit Gladiators and Cleveland Ghosts each finished 10-6, with Detroit’s well-rounded squad returning to form and the Ghosts riding a strong defense and a workhorse RB in Jose Ortuno.

 

While the North remained strong, the Northeast dropped off considerably.  Following a year in which the division boasted four teams with double-digit win totals, only the Boston Captains managed the feat this year.  Their 10-6 record secured them their first division title in 32 years.  Perhaps more noteworthy, however, was the fact that the Pittsburgh Miners went 7-9, posting just their third losing record since 1960, but their second of the 1980s.  Rob Connery was terrible under center, and whispers have begun to circulate that the 68-year old Willie Krause may be losing his touch, having now gone nearly a decade without a trip to the Victory Bowl.

 

The Colorado Centennials actually finished with a worse record in 1985 (10-6) than they had in 1984 (11-5), but at the same time, their most bitter rivals, the Minnesota Angels, fell from 14-1-1 to 10-6, allowing the Cents to retake the division title on tiebreakers.  The two teams actually have a lot in common, with talented rosters loaded with postseason experience.  They are both considered legitimate title contenders, despite the fact that they will be seeded 6th and 7th, and both teams know that their championship window could be coming to an end.

 

The league’s top-seeded team was a surprise, as the Atlanta Rebels exploded to a 13-3 record coming off of a .500 season.  The Baltimore Royals struggled desperately to stay in the playoff chase, but injuries devastated the team, especially in the second half of the year.  In late October, they even sent a draft pick to Tampa Bay in exchange for veteran QB Joey Branson-Greene after losing Derrill Punch for the year to a shoulder injury.  Branson-Greene had struggled for the Bobcats, but he had enough success on his résumé that the Royals brass had hope that he could regain his form on a more talented team.  The gamble would not pay off, Branson-Greene was no more effective in Baltimore than he had in Tampa, and the Royals lost 5 of their last 8 games to finish at 8-8.  The Bobcats, on the other hand, fared much better after the trade.  Third-year QB Bobby Davis took over the starting job with the team sitting at 2-6, and proceeded to win 6 of the last 8.  That stretch included an incredible 5 overtime victories (including one over the Rebels), which earned Davis the nickname “The Cardiac Cat.”

 

Despite the fact that three teams finished at .500, this division appears to have a great deal of potential, as a young core of stars seems to be developing for both Floridian franchises.  Though Davis still needs a lot of help on offense (his most valuable weapon is RB Gary Fryer, the team’s first-ever draft pick, but his inability to stay healthy has led to him being labelled a bust), the team is developing a front 7 on defense that is being compared to that of the early San Diego Destroyers.  Miami, on the other hand, has a handful of current or potential superstars who are still in their 20s.  LB Mark Zaragoza and DE Allen McCarty may already be the best at their respective positions, and LT Jerome Grenja and QB Bob Obradovic have the potential to get there.

 

The South reinforced their reputation as the league’s weakest division, as the New Orleans Krewe and Houston Hurricanes spent the season in a dogfight for the lead… and to stay over .500.  Both teams have very weak rosters that are carried by a budding superstar at quarterback, 23-year old Donny Minor in New Orleans and 24-year old Tom Hudson in Houston.  The division wouldn’t be decided until the final week of the season.  Both teams went into week 17 at 8-7, with Houston holding the tiebreaker.  The Krewe needed a victory over the Texas Stallions in Dallas and for the Firebirds to upset the Hurricanes in Houston, but neither happened.  The normally anemic Stallions offense dropped 30 points on the Krewe, while the Hurricanes shut out the Firebirds 27-0.  This will be Houston’s first trip back to the postseason since their 50-0 shellacking at the hands of the Miners in the 31st Victory Bowl.

 

1985_0_by_verasthebrujah-dbj07i0.jpg

 

AFA Magazine Postseason Previews

 

Cleveland Ghosts vs Minnesota Angels

 

This showdown between the previous two Victory Bowl champions may be one of the most evenly-matched postseason games in memory.  The Angels pass defense clearly holds the edge, with the lockdown corners and the still-dangerous 36-year old DE Lee Thomas to harass Therron Nikoloudis in the pocket, but they’re no longer what they once were in the middle, and Cleveland’s powerful RB Jose Ortuno will surely take advantage. The Minnesota offense is more well-rounded, but the Ghosts defense matches up well.  Whoever scores last will win this game, likely in overtime.  Angels eke out a win, 23-20.

 

Detroit Gladiators vs San Diego Destroyers

 

This should be another good matchup.  Both teams are reasonably well-rounded, and both boast one true superstar.  In Detroit, that is QB John Lewis, and in San Diego, LB Shell Thompson.  The two teams met in San Diego in October – a matchup that Detroit won 23-21 after Destroyers kicker Jeff Austin hit the upright on a 36 yard field goal attempt with under 2 minutes to play (it was the only miss of less than 45 yards in Austin’s 4-year career).  The margin of victory will be within a touchdown, and it comes down to whether or not Shell can get to Lewis.  We think the quarterback will stay on his feet, and lead the Gladiators to victory, 27-24.

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On 8/3/2017 at 9:45 AM, Cardinal said:

Out of the 3 teams in trouble, which is the most likely to actually move? And I called Buffalo getting a team a while ago so that's what i'm rooting for. If Buffalo does get another team, could they be called the Stamps again or do the Sharks retain the rights to that identity?

Baltimore or Portland are probably slightly more likely to move than Philadelphia.  They've been there since the 50s, and Philly is the largest market of the three.  The departure of the Bishops might save the Royals, and what happens in Portland depends entirely on the buyer.

 

A team returning to Buffalo won't be the Stampeders.  The Sharks took the history and trademarks with them when they moved to Jersey.

 

On 8/3/2017 at 4:27 PM, b0ss pls said:

What is the fate of the Dragons franchise, do they rebrand or move?

Or stay where they are.  Any of the three are possible, and we'll know more this offseason.

 

2 hours ago, DNAsports said:

The passing of the three owners got me thinking about a certain man on Bourbon Street. How's Dwayne Carp holding up? He's 53 which makes him still a relatively younger owner and likely in good health. Would it also be a good thing to assume he's a pretty respected by players and other owners?

Yes.  He's actually one of the longer-tenured owners in the league now, having bought the team 20 years ago.  In fact, he will likely become a major figure in the league within the next few years.  Only 7 men have been running teams longer than he has, and with the exception of Baltimore's Paul King (50 years old), they range in age from 69-90.  As those guys retire or die over the next decade, Carp will likely grow into something of an elder statesman for the AFA.

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That talk about Dwayne Carp makes me curious; who's the youngest AFA owner right now?

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Houston's Reubin O'Neill (37) and New York's Raymond Jarvis (46) are the only two under the age of 50.  13 owners are in their 50s, 6 are in their 60s, and 5 are in their 70s.  The two oldest are St. Louis's Bobby Blankenship (86) and Seattle's Ed Kennedy (90).  Kennedy is in remarkably good health - he runs at least a mile every day and usually works 60+ hours a week.

 

Cleveland's John Luckner (78) is the only living founding owner in the league, and he still runs the team.

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Yay a Division Title, Shame we have to go against the Guardians. I just hope Majors pulls a rabbit out of his hat. Who is Boston's Owner actually?

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Why does the North division have the be so stacked. The Butchers look bad with the three great teams. Well at least they might do well when all three fall off. Speaking of owners, how's the Granger situation going on. I can't remember if either of the two children of Hal Granger are still living and still constantly feuding with each other. 

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48 minutes ago, Darknes said:

Yay a Division Title, Shame we have to go against the Guardians. I just hope Majors pulls a rabbit out of his hat. Who is Boston's Owner actually?

Boston's owner is Warren Black.  He's 70 years old, and the son of Buzz Black, who founded the team by merging the Boston Riders and Albany Indians in 1946.  The situation there is stable.  The Black family has been involved in professional football forever, and it is unlikely that they will ever give up ownership of the team.

 

32 minutes ago, Mercy_King said:

Why does the North division have the be so stacked. The Butchers look bad with the three great teams. Well at least they might do well when all three fall off. Speaking of owners, how's the Granger situation going on. I can't remember if either of the two children of Hal Granger are still living and still constantly feuding with each other. 

Yeah, this was a rough year for Chicago.  They were 7-3 against opponents outside of their division, but dropped all 6 against Cincinnati, Cleveland, and Detroit.  I think I said this last year, but if they were in the Southern Division, they would almost certainly be a playoff team.  They're still a few years away from being really competitive in the North, though.  Cleveland is probably as good as they are ever going to be, but the other two are pretty young squads.  Detroit is incredibly raw, and it's hard to tell how much potential they really have.  Cincinnati is young and extraordinarily talented, and could very well be the next great dynasty.  Honestly, if the Guardians should be disappointed if they don't win 2-3 Victory Bowls over the next half decade or so.  Hell, they should be disappointed that they don't already have one.

 

Alice Granger died in 1981.  She never married and had no children, so Herb now has 100% control of the team.  He is 78, though, and has ceded a lot of power to his son, Henry.

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Good to see Milwaukee on the rise.

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Kansas City regressed a bit. What happened there? 

 

Noticed that LA just can't get anything going. Same with Philadelphia. What is holding back those two franchises?

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It was just a bad year for them.  They didn't play well and were hit hard by injuries, especially at quarterback.  Greg Benham in particular had a hard time staying on the field, and he wasn't great even when he did play.  He only started in weeks 1-3, 9, and 15-17, and he came off the bench in week 11 after John Vessey (who had been filling in for him) went down.  Vessey started 5 games, and Rick Scott (who was on the practice squad when the season began) started the other two.  

 

Actually, I meant to include that story in the writeup.  I must have deleted it when editing.  Remember, John Vessey is the QB that the Cents let go over the offseason after the acquired Frankie Farragut in a trade from Cleveland.  He looked much better for the Crows this year than he ever did in Colorado, and in fact, he posted a QB rating that was nearly 10 points higher than Farragut's.

 

It's doubtful that there will be a QB controversy, though.  Benham is firmly entrenched as the starter, and unless the injuries that he suffered this year have a long-term effect on his play, or Vessey has a major breakthrough, that's not going to change.

 

Philadelphia's biggest problem has been poor drafting.  Their top pick this year, CB Chalmer Jones, has looked good so far, almost unanimously winning DROY honors, but that type of pick has not been the trend.  Their QB, John LeBell, is very good, a likely candidate to join Ron Adams and Reggie Hart in the conversation for best in the league.  Other than that, almost every other player on the team would be unlikely to start on an average AFA squad.  Their division is also holding them back - every year they have to play a total of 8 games against Pittsburgh, Boston, New York, and New Jersey.

 

In LA, the problem is the lack of a quarterback.  They haven't had a competent starter since Jack "Hollywood" Holmes retired after the 1981 season, and really, he was terrible the last few years that he played.  The Comets had the top pick last year, but traded it away, thinking that there weren't any obvious franchise players available.  This year, they hold the number two pick, and would love to be able to take Bruce Rankins (QB - Georgia Tech).  However, he is almost certain to go to Arizona first overall, which means that the Comets will probably end up picking Andy Stough (QB - Iowa).

 

And hey, while we're talking about QBs available in the draft - Dave Random (QB - Tennessee), son of former Wasps, Whales, Dragons, and Firebirds signal caller C.J. Random, will be available.  He's projected to be a mid-round pick, so it's unlikely that he will make a huge (or any) impact on the league.  But his father was a fan favorite, winning two titles with the Wasps (1967 and 1977); and the question of AFA families came up recently, so I thought he might be worth mentioning.

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