Veras

History of a Fictional Football League (1990 New Jersey Sharks)

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Time for my annual failure at playoffs predictions;

 

Houston Harvey's over the Atlanta Controversial Name's

 

St Louis Ace of Clubs over Minnesota Angles

 

Guardians of the AFA over Pittsburgh Minors

 

Los Angeles Comets Cupids and Rudolf's over Roman Gladiators 

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29 minutes ago, CodeG said:

Time for my annual failure at playoffs predictions;

 

Houston Harvey's over the Atlanta Controversial Name's

 

St Louis Ace of Clubs over Minnesota Angles

 

Guardians of the AFA over Pittsburgh Minors

 

Los Angeles Comets Cupids and Rudolf's over Roman Gladiators 

tumblr_ol8i32srzL1tu7563o5_400.gif

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Looks like my predictions fell flat.

 

Hurricanes blow the Rebels away

Aces shoot the Angels out of the sky

Guardians take out the Miners

(The Purple and Orange) Comets shoot past the Gladiators.

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1988 AFA Postseason:  Quarterfinals

 

88r2g1houvsatl_by_verasthebrujah-dc052zt

The game started with a bit of a scare for the heavily-favored Hurricanes.  They advanced into the red zone on the opening drive, but the attack stalled, and they were forced to settle for a field goal.  The same thing happened 10 minutes later, and then Atlanta quickly answered with a field goal to make it 6-3.  Early in the second, the Rebels threatened to take the lead, advancing all the way to the Houston 9 before Michael Divers blindsided QB Wesley Marx on a cornerback blitz, forcing a fumble.  The Hurricanes offense finally started clicking, and less than two minutes later they pushed into the red zone for the third time of the day – but a dropped pass on 3rd and 7 forced them to settle for yet another field goal.  Then, to the dismay of the home crowd, Marx put together a 9 play, 83 yard drive that ended with a 19 yard pass to WR Alan Myers, sending Atlanta into the half with a 10-9 lead.

 

The Hurricanes came out strong to start the third, picking off Marx 42 seconds into the quarter, and taking the lead two plays later on an 18-yard strike from Tom Hudson to WR James Petrovic, but the Rebels refused to quit.  Marx led another touchdown drive, this time taking the ball in himself on a sneak to reclaim the lead.  The lead would briefly trade hands again late in the third quarter when Houston kicker James Pickle connected on his fourth field goal of the day, but the Rebels again answered with an immediate touchdown.

 

Those hoping to see an upset were sorely disappointed by the game’s final 13 minutes, which completely belonged to the Hurricanes.  They retook the lead on a 7-yard run by RB Matt Cotten on the ensuing drive, then forced a punt, and extended their advantage to 34-24 when Hudson hit Petrovic for his second touchdown of the day.  The Rebel offense pressed the attack, but they couldn’t get it done, and they failed to advance into Houston territory for the remainder of the game.  Their final hope for a comeback was crushed when a pass from Marx went off of the fingertips of TE Lee Flynn on 4th down with 2:20 to play.  The Hurricanes took over at the Atlanta 40, and never gave the ball back.

 

88r2g2stlvsmin_by_verasthebrujah-dc0530o

Defense ruled this game early on.  It took nearly the entire first quarter for either team to advance as far as field goal range, and when the Aces did so in the final minute, their drive stalled at the two, forcing them to settle for a short field goal.  On the ensuing kickoff, returner Terry Croze made what initially seemed to be a decent return, advancing nearly to the 30 before being wrapped up.  However, the Aces were able to stand him up and knock the ball free from his hands.  St. Louis’s Hassan Rush scooped the ball off of the ground and sprinted to the end zone for a touchdown.  In a matter of seconds, the Aces had established a 10-0 lead.

 

Minnesota’s veteran defense wasn’t shaken by the turn of events, and held strong while they waited for the offense to find some rhythm.  They finally managed to do so late in the second quarter, advancing as far as the St. Louis 22, but a one-handed interception by CB Vic Jacobs stopped them from putting up points.  Again, the Minnesota defense held strong, and was able to force the Aces to punt from deep within their own territory.  Finally, 15 seconds before the half, the Angels finally got on the board on a 7 yard strike to WR Cedric Harrison.

 

The teams traded field goals in the third, and St. Louis’s 13-10 lead held through the first 9 minutes of the fourth.  Finally, with 6 minutes on the clock, Angels RB Tommy Howard shook off two tacklers on his way into the end zone on 3rd down to give his team their first lead of the day.

 

It wouldn’t last long.  Not wanting to be shown up by the veteran, Aces Rookie RB Will Ducasse exploded into form, accounting for 69 of the 78 yards accrued by the team on their ensuing touchdown drive, including the two-yard run that capped it off.  The Angels retook the field, but their drive came to an end when FS Ernie Harris out-battled WR Thomas Greene for a pass.  The Aces retook possession with 2:39 to play at their own 42, and the rookie Ducasse again came through for them.  The offense methodically drove down the field, and Ducasse picked up his second 2-yard touchdown run with 45 seconds left to play.

 

Trailing by 10, Minnesota simply ran out of time for a comeback attempt.  The Aces won it, and are now one win away from their first Victory Bowl trip in nearly two decades.

 

 

88r2g3cinvspit_by_verasthebrujah-dc05314

This highly-anticipated matchup ended up being pretty anticlimactic, as the Miners had the kind of day where nothing seemed to break their way.  They actually had the first opportunity to put up points, but K Dave Shealy slipped on the extremely slick turf as he planted his foot.  He fell awkwardly, missing the ball and tearing his ACL.  The Miners lost possession, and their kicker.

 

The Guardians showed no mercy, as Hart immediately led a touchdown drive, ending with a pass to TE Vic Meredith.  They built their lead further near the end of the quarter when All-Star DT Andrew Gray sacked George Gilbert at the Pittsburgh 6, stripping the ball in the process.  As both teams fought for the ball, it bounced into the end zone, where it was recovered by DT Ray Ray McLellan.

 

The Miners broke the shutout in the second quarter, as P Jim Goff connected on a 28-yard field goal attempt (his first since high school).  However, this was both preceded and succeeded by Cincinnati field goals, which gave the Guardians a 20-3 lead going into the half.

 

Things got out of hand after the half, as the Guardians put up 17 unanswered points.  Adding insult to injury for the Pittsburgh special teams, the final 7 points came on a touchdown that was set up by a turnover at the hands of KR Shad Distel.

 

Trailing 37-3 late in the third, the Miners finally seemed to arrive.  Gilbert hit WR Jose Wise for a 28-yard touchdown in the final two minutes of the quarter, and a 68-yard punt return touchdown by Distel two minutes into the fourth both redeemed his earlier fumble and gave Pittsburgh fans hope for an improbable comeback.

 

The Guardians would not let that happen, however.  Their offense responded by going 80 yards in less than two minutes before RB Jim Hill pounded his way into the end zone to make the score 44-17.  Pittsburgh’s comeback hopes were effectively ended, and after a Cincinnati pick with just under 4 minutes to play, both teams pulled their starters.  The Guardians are going to the semifinals for the third time in four years.

 

88r2g4detvsla_by_verasthebrujah-dc05320.

The first big play of the day came five minutes into the game when Detroit QB John Lewis overthrew WR Angelo Caro, and was picked off, setting up the Comets with a chance to start a drive from the Gladiator 43.  To the delight of the home crowd, however, they failed to take advantage.  After RB Dale Doubet was stuffed on first down, the Comets tried turning to the screen, but LB John Schneider jumped the pass and took it to the house to give Detroit an early lead.

 

The Comets answered with a field goal, which the Gladiators matched midway through the second, but shortly before the half, the Gladiators seized control of the game.  Facing third and long from deep within his own territory, Comet QB Andy Stough floated a pass to WR Joey Webber down the left sideline.  CB Steven Lee was able to get a hand on it, and somehow bring the ball in.  The Gladiators took advantage of the short field, going 38 yards in just over a minute and taking a 17-3 lead into halftime.

 

The Comets struck back 8 minutes into the third when Doubet broke a tackle by a pair of linebackers and dashed into the end zone from 12 yards out.  The Gladiators made it a two score game by putting up a field goal on their ensuing drive, but as the fourth quarter began, the game was very much up in the air.  LA’s best chance to take the lead came when CB James Robinson picked off Lewis at the LA 25 and nearly took it all the way.  RB Johnny Hewitt caught Robinson from behind and made a shoestring tackle at the Detroit 33, saving the touchdown.  Los Angeles, feeling embolded, came out aggressively and took a shot at the end zone on first down.  However, WR Timothy Candela lost sight of the ball, and CB Ron Pryce picked it off for a touchback.

 

The Detroit offense immediately put together an 80-yard touchdown drive, extending their lead to 27-10 and running the clock down to 4:05 in the process.  The Comets would be unable to score, sending Detroit to the semifinals for the first time since 1982.

 

1988_0_by_verasthebrujah-dbzrs2t.jpg

 

Semifinals Previews

 

For the second consecutive season, each of the final four teams are led by elite quarterbacks, and are strong championship contenders.  There is no doubt that all of them belong here.

 

St. Louis Aces vs Guardians of Cincinnati

 

These two teams met in November, and St. Louis’s 34-17 victory, which put their record at 6-2, was widely seen as the moment that the league began taking them seriously.

 

This really is a difficult game to predict.  Cincinnati is widely regarded as being the most talented team in the league (a title that they will likely claim as long as Reggie Hart and Vic Meredith both continue to produce), but the Aces boast a very strong squad with excellent chemistry, especially on offense.  Cannon-armed QB Danny Buckingham splits targets between the sure-handed All-Pro Rickie Solorzano and the fleet-footed Morgan Slade, while rookie RB Will Ducasse keeps defenses honest.

 

The Aces will likely have a hard time covering Meredith, but the hard-hitting safety duo of Ernie Harris and J.J. Henson will punish him every time he touches the ball.  Meanwhile, LB Ed Stacey is one of the few guys in the league who can run with Hart.

 

This game will be closer than the November matchup, with it likely coming down to the final possession.  Aces knock off the dynasty, 34-31.

 

Houston Hurricanes vs Detroit Gladiators

 

This is a rematch of a quarterfinals game from a season ago.  That 43-41 Houston victory was one of the great games in AFA history, ending in overtime on a safety following a muffed kick return by Detroit’s Johnny Hewitt.  This has the potential to be another high-scoring instant classic.

 

The Gladiators will be slight favorites this time around.  Both teams have rising stars at quarterback – both Houston’s Tom Hudson and Detroit’s John Lewis are seen as likely candidates to succeed Reggie Hart and Ron Adams at the top of the AFA’s hierarchy of passers – and both have a stable of good but not great wideouts.  The biggest difference on offense is the superiority of Hewitt over Houston’s Matt Cotten.  The former is arguably the league’s best back, while the latter is mediocre veteran who failed to fulfil the promise he showed as a rookie.

 

Both defenses claim several All-Stars as well.  Detroit’s best players are probably superior, particularly LB John Schneider and SS Eddie Kosakowski, but Houston is one of the more well-rounded teams in the league.

 

Detroit wins it in overtime (making this the third overtime contest between these two squads in the past 15 months), 31-28.

Edited by Veras
I forgot to include St. Louis's anniversary patch. That made me realize that I didn't proofread the scoreboards, which means I'll probably have to correct at least one more error.

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7 hours ago, RealSkillsAbraham said:

How do you simulate the games/seasons?

You can get a full explanation on the first post under the spoiler labeled "Running the AFA."

 

The short version is that each season, every team is assigned a constant rating between 1.00 and 10.00 (realistically, it's exceptionally rare for anyone to fall below 2 or exceed 9). For each game, teams also receive a random number to indicate how well they played (I call this variable the roll), with home teams getting numbers between 1.00 and 12.00, and visiting teams getting numbers between 1.00 and 10.00.  I give temporary bonuses or penalties during the postseason to teams that rolled exceptionally well or poorly during the regular season, with each standard deviation above or below the mean worth +/- 0.5.  In the Victory Bowl, which is played on a neutral field, both teams roll 1.00-10.00, unless there is a plausible reason that one team would have partial or full homefield advantage.  If New York and Seattle play a Victory Bowl in New Jersey, I'd give the Imperials a 1.00-12.00.  If the game were in Philadelphia or DC, I'd give them a 1.00-11.00.  I've also given d11s under circumstances where most otherwise neutral observers have a reason to favor one team over the other.  The year that Washington won it all after their owner passed away comes to mind.

 

At this point, everything outside of assigning the constant is totally automated in Excel.  All I have to do is rate the teams and put the year in the spreadsheet, and it automatically looks up the matchups, generates the rolls, compares the results, and then tallies team records.  Even the tiebreaker procedure is largely automatic, though I do have to check just to be sure.  I've been meaning to post screenshots of my template spreadsheet, because I'm pretty proud of it.  I'll probably wait until the league expands to 30, though, because it will be prettier once the divisions are even.

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2 hours ago, Veras said:

You can get a full explanation on the first post under the spoiler labeled "Running the AFA."

 

The short version is that each season, every team is assigned a constant rating between 1.00 and 10.00 (realistically, it's exceptionally rare for anyone to fall below 2 or exceed 9). For each game, teams also receive a random number to indicate how well they played (I call this variable the roll), with home teams getting numbers between 1.00 and 12.00, and visiting teams getting numbers between 1.00 and 10.00.  I give temporary bonuses or penalties during the postseason to teams that rolled exceptionally well or poorly during the regular season, with each standard deviation above or below the mean worth +/- 0.5.  In the Victory Bowl, which is played on a neutral field, both teams roll 1.00-10.00, unless there is a plausible reason that one team would have partial or full homefield advantage.  If New York and Seattle play a Victory Bowl in New Jersey, I'd give the Imperials a 1.00-12.00.  If the game were in Philadelphia or DC, I'd give them a 1.00-11.00.  I've also given d11s under circumstances where most otherwise neutral observers have a reason to favor one team over the other.  The year that Washington won it all after their owner passed away comes to mind.

 

At this point, everything outside of assigning the constant is totally automated in Excel.  All I have to do is rate the teams and put the year in the spreadsheet, and it automatically looks up the matchups, generates the rolls, compares the results, and then tallies team records.  Even the tiebreaker procedure is largely automatic, though I do have to check just to be sure.  I've been meaning to post screenshots of my template spreadsheet, because I'm pretty proud of it.  I'll probably wait until the league expands to 30, though, because it will be prettier once the divisions are even.

Do you think you could post the whole spreadsheet for those of us that like this type of thing?

 

I’ve built many in the past and would love to see the actual workings of the sheet as a whole. 

 

Im also okay if you want to wait until your experiment is over, but I’m not interested in the historical info... just the spreadsheet. :)

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12 hours ago, Cardsblues02 said:

I’m predicting the Comets go all the way!

Unfortunately, this prediction was wrong. I say this every year, but maybe next season!

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Was hoping the Comets could do some Cinderella-ing. But the final four teams are all really good. My failure at predictions 

 

Detroit Gladdy-eators over Houston We-Got-A-Porblem Harveys

 

Cincinnati, Guardians of over St Louis Aces of Spades

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10 hours ago, EmeraldSpecter said:

Do you think you could post the whole spreadsheet for those of us that like this type of thing?

 

I’ve built many in the past and would love to see the actual workings of the sheet as a whole. 

 

Im also okay if you want to wait until your experiment is over, but I’m not interested in the historical info... just the spreadsheet. :)

 

I would also love to have it so I can run my own leagues. Sounds awesome!

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Gladiators beat the Hurricanes

Guardians beat the Aces

 

An intra-divisional Victory Bowl: Are you not entertained at this prospect?

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Alright, 3-1 this round brings me to 5-1. My poor Angels cost me the one.

For the Semifinals, I'm going:

Hurricanes
Guardians

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My predictions are:

Houston to defeat Detroit.

Cincinnati to defeat St. Louis.

 

Victory Bowl prediction:

Cincinnati go for their third title in four seasons and succeed - though the 43rd Victory Bowl will be a lot closer than the 42nd.

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1988 AFA Playoffs:  Semifinals

 

88r3g1stlvscin_by_verasthebrujah-dc0doa4

In the week leading up to the game, this was touted as an incredibly exciting matchup, but once the game began, things got off to a pretty slow start.  The Guardians pushed deep into the red zone midway through the first, but were forced to settle for 3 after the defense tightened up.  The Aces were the first into the end zone on a 1-yard run by RB Will Ducasse in the final seconds of the opening quarter.  They then added a pair of field goals in the second, including a 52-yarder in the final minute, allowing them to go into the half with a 13-3 advantage.

 

The Guardians got back into the game early in the third after a fumble by Ducasse set them up to start a drive 12 yards from the end zone.  Three plays later, RB Jim Hill ducked into the end zone to make it a 3-point game.  However the young Aces squad was unfazed.  Just over 5 minutes later they responded with a touchdown of their own as Danny Buckingham hit WR Rickie Solorzano from 18 yards out.  The Guardians offense responded by driving deep into St. Louis territory, but came away without points after Reggie Hart fumbled into the end zone and out of bounds while scrambling for a touchdown.  The Aces seized the momentum, taking only about two minutes to score after Morgan Slade toasted the Cincinnati defense for a 62-yard touchdown, taking a 27-10 lead with just over 13 minutes to play.

 

The Guardians, realizing that their backs were up against the wall, came up big, running less than two minutes off the clock as Hart led a touchdown drive, ending with a pass to TE Vic Meredith.  They then forced a punt, and added 3 more points on a 44-yard field goal, which made it a one score game at 27-20.

 

Buckingham struck back, connecting with Solorzano for their second touchdown of the day, and extending the lead to 14 with just over 5 minutes to play.  The Aces defense held strong, forcing a punt, and St. Louis was able to run the clock down to inside the two-minute mark before having to send their punt team out.  However, CB Denny O’Neal came through huge for the visitors, coming around the edge and blocking the punt.  The ball went straight back to P Bob Essig, who panicked and attempted to pass the ball.  DE Tom Commons deflected and caught it, bowled over Essig, and rumbled 19 yards into the end zone.  The teams were again separated by only 7 points with 1:50 on the clock.

 

An onside kick attempt failed, but the Guardians burned their timeouts, allowing the Aces to run only 13 seconds off the clock before sending the punting unit back out.  By the time Hart took the field again, he needed to cover 91 yards in 1:28 with no timeouts.  He led the offense down the field methodically, only once facing a third down.  Eventually, as time ran down, WR Avery Gonzalez caught a pass near the sideline, but failed to get out of bounds and was tackled at the 12.  The offense rushed to the line of scrimmage, and managed to get the snap off just as time expired.  Not having time for a spike, Hart looked for Meredith, but the tight end was well-covered.  He ducked under the outstretched arms of ROLB Ed Stacy, and then rolled back to his left to buy time.  Under pursuit and running out of space, he threw up a prayer to WR Stephon Lockett, who wrestled it free from the hands of CB John Wood. 

 

It was a touchdown!  The Guardians would be able to tie the game at 34 with the extra point and send it to overtime while they held all of the momentum.  The sideline was so elated as they prepared for the extra period, that most of them didn’t even notice rookie K Ricky de la Peña shank the kick, sending it so far wide right that it missed the net.  It was only after the stadium erupted into thunderous applause that they realized that their season was over.  The Aces had earned the right to play in the Victory Bowl for the first time since the 1969 season.

 

88r3g2houvsdet_by_verasthebrujah-dc0dndc

After a thriller in the afternoon, the evening’s game, which featured arguably the most exciting budding rivalry in the AFA, would be surprisingly dull.  The score was close all day, which generated some excitement, but neither team played particularly well, so spectators were essentially treated to a duel between punters.  The fact that both teams would struggle to move the ball was made clear early on, when Houston RB Matt Cotten lost a fumble at midfield on the opening drive.  The Gladiators were able to pick up 3 points as a result of the error, and added 3 more late in the first.  However, they wouldn’t hold the lead long.  The Hurricanes jumped in front on the first play of the second quarter, as Cotten found the end zone.  Then, with 4 minutes remaining before the half, QB Tom Hudson made it 14-6 with a 32 yard pass to WR Ernest Hoskins.  The Gladiators responded immediately, taking barely more than a minute to answer with a touchdown of their own on an 8-yard pass from QB John Lewis to RB Johnny Hewitt, sending the game to the half with Houston leading 14-13.

 

The Gladiators built on their momentum at the beginning of the second half, pushing deep into Houston territory on their first drive, but ultimately had to be satisfied with taking a 2-point lead after a field goal.  After that moment, neither team could accomplish much of anything.  More than 23 minutes would run off the clock without either team scoring any points or recording a takeaway (Detroit did manage to force a fumble after sacking Tom Hudson late in the third, but G Rick Smith was able to recover).  Finally, with 4:08 to play, the Gladiators found the end zone again, with Hewitt dragging a pair of Hurricane defenders across the goal line.

 

Houston’s offensive struggles continued, and Detroit held on to their 23-14 advantage as time ran out.  The Gladiators are going back to the Victory Bowl for the first time since 1966.

 

1988_afa_postseason_bracket_by_verastheb

 

AFA Magazine Victory Bowl Preview

 

Neither of these franchises are strangers to the Victory Bowl.  The Aces have been four times, winning the 8th (def. Boston, 19-13) and 23rd (def. New York, 27-17) while losing the 22nd (Washington, 23-14) and 24th (Pittsburgh, 17-16).  This will be Detroit’s 8th appearance, tying them with New York for the second-most in the league.  Remarkably, their first seven appearances came in consecutive seasons (obviously an AFA record).  They won the 16th (def. Pittsburgh 16-3), 17th (def. New Orleans 14-13), and 19th (def. Buffalo 34-3), but lost the 15th (Pittsburgh, 31-24), 18th (Pittsburgh, 30-27), 20th (Colorado, 27-17), and 21st (Pittsburgh, 20-13).  Either St. Louis or Detroit appeared in the championship game for every season of the 1960s.

 

This postseason has included a lot of good matchups, and the trend will continue with the Victory Bowl.  Both teams feature elite, young quarterbacks and a handful of defensive superstars.  St. Louis’s Danny Buckingham has a better arsenal of pass-catchers, most notably All-Star WR Rickie Solorzano, but Detroit’s John Lewis has a stronger offensive line and a superstar RB Johnny Hewitt.

 

As much focus is being put on the Lewis vs Buckingham matchup, Hewitt will probably have to carry the day for the Gladiators if they hope to win.  The St. Louis pass defense is phenomenal, thanks to the pass rushing ability of All-Pro Ed Stacey and a phenomenally talented (and hard-hitting) secondary.  The team’s biggest lability is their run defense.  The front seven are a bit undersized, and can be pushed around by more physical teams.  If the Gladiators win, it is all but certain that Hewitt will take home the Victory Bowl MVP.

 

St. Louis, on the other hand, has some excellent matchups that they can exploit if they can avoid the Gladiators biggest stars.  Hard-hitting SS Eddie Kosakowski will deliver bone-rattling shots to anyone trying to come across the middle, while LB John Schneider will be tasked with getting into the backfield and making Buckingham uncomfortable, and CB Ron Pryce is one of the few corners in the league who may be able to keep Solorzano contained.  If the Aces can work around those three, they will have the ability to put up a lot of points.  If they can build a big enough lead to limit Dewitt’s effectiveness, they can easily win this game.

 

The two teams met in St. Louis in early December, and St. Louis came out on top, 24-13.  That result isn’t necessarily indicative of what will happen in the Victory Bowl – Johnny Dewitt was playing through a sprained ankle and was not particularly effective – but it will give this young Aces team the confidence that they need to get it done.  For the first time in nearly a decade, the Victory Bowl will come down to the wire, with the Aces winning a shootout, 34-31.

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On 1/16/2018 at 12:15 AM, EmeraldSpecter said:

Do you think you could post the whole spreadsheet for those of us that like this type of thing?

 

I’ve built many in the past and would love to see the actual workings of the sheet as a whole. 

 

Im also okay if you want to wait until your experiment is over, but I’m not interested in the historical info... just the spreadsheet. :)

I'll think about it.  It's kind of messy right now with the divisions not being equal in size, so I might wait until the next expansion.  Or maybe I'll just post the USFA one, which is much neater.  Maybe I'll do the same thing with the player generation spreadsheet and the one that I use to progress players over time.  Those are both actually far more complicated than the gameplay one anyway.

 

On 1/16/2018 at 11:00 AM, cienpelusas said:

 

I would also love to have it so I can run my own leagues. Sounds awesome!

It wouldn't really work like that.  It only works if the conditions match the current AFA exactly.  28 teams, no divisions, and the specific schedule rotation that I've chosen.

 

On 1/16/2018 at 11:28 AM, Red Comet said:

Gladiators beat the Hurricanes

Guardians beat the Aces

 

An intra-divisional Victory Bowl: Are you not entertained at this prospect?

I can't believe that we've never had an intra-divisional Victory Bowl before.  There have been times where it could easily have happened.  The North and Central are definitely good enough to produce two Victory Bowl teams now, and the Northeast might be able to.

 

On 1/17/2018 at 7:30 AM, Goran The Man said:

My predictions are:

Houston to defeat Detroit.

Cincinnati to defeat St. Louis.

 

Victory Bowl prediction:

Cincinnati go for their third title in four seasons and succeed - though the 43rd Victory Bowl will be a lot closer than the 42nd.

You missed on both games, but let's hope your prediction about the Victory Bowl being closer is correct.  There have only been a couple of close, exciting championships since the mid-70s.  The last one that was decided by a single score was the 34th (following the 1980 season), and the final score there was 9-7, making it one of the least exciting Victory Bowls of all time.

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That St Louis vs Cincinnati game, dang, reminds me of that Vikings/Saints game. My predictions were a little wrong, I wanted that intra-divion VB, Aces and Detroit should be exciting. I personally cheering for the Aces since Detroit and Cleveland are in the same division

 

So my failure predictions are St Louis Spirits (wrong league) Aces over Detroit I-get-them-confused-with-Cincinnati Gladiator Guardians

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9 minutes ago, CodeG said:

That St Louis vs Cincinnati game, dang, reminds me of that Vikings/Saints game. My predictions were a little wrong, I wanted that intra-divion VB, Aces and Detroit should be exciting. I personally cheering for the Aces since Detroit and Cleveland are in the same division

 

So my failure predictions are St Louis Spirits (wrong league) Aces over Detroit I-get-them-confused-with-Cincinnati Gladiator Guardians

Would u call it your Annual Playoff Jinxing?

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