Ice_Cap

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Ice_Cap last won the day on March 4

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About Ice_Cap

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    go Leafs go!

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    Tampa, FL
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    Toronto Blue Jays, Toronto Maple Leafs

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  1. It might have been an attempt to fit in with the existing Toronto sports scene. The Maple Leafs and Argos were both blue and white. U of T athletics were blue and white. Various incarnations of the Maple Leafs minor league baseball team were blue and white. So I can see the appeal of a team moving to Toronto going with a primarily blue and white look to fit in. It doesn’t explain the green, but who knows? Maybe it was intended to be an accent colour like the red is with the Blue Jays’ identity? And while merchandising wasn’t much of a thing back then? Debuting in Toronto with a blue and white colour scheme would pay dividends today. You know how the Brewers make a lot of money by selling both the navy/old gold look and the ball-in-glove throwbacks? Imagine a Toronto Giants team selling both blue, white, and green gear AND black and orange throwback inspired gear.
  2. Like @shaydre1019 said, this is a forum for people to discuss sports unis and logos. So anything will have people who both like and dislike it
  3. Like @monkeypower said, Manziel won’t be able to play in the XFL if Vince sticks to his “no past criminal behaviour” stance. Anyway the Apollos lose. Nuts.
  4. Yeah, the Rams only got to wear their throwbacks as often as they did because they petitioned the league and essentially made them their primaries. The Browns would need to do the same thing...ask for permission to tweak the rules.
  5. No. The timeline of uni design does not line up with that being viable.
  6. I get it. And I also want to repeate that this isn’t a zero sum game. Hell, I’ve followed the CFL and NFL separately for as long as I’ve been a football fan. There’s no law that says you can only like one team per sport. It’s analogous to hockey. Do the Kitchener Rangers take away from the Maple Leafs’ support in Kitchener-Waterloo? No, and they never will. That being said there are plenty of people who root for both. And that’s ok. The OHL game is different from the NHL, talent level not withstanding. And it means both can co-exist. So if the AAF or XFL 2.0 present a game you like? Go for it. The NFL will still be waiting for you, and you can like teams in all three leagues.
  7. Exactly. The best jet logo in the “Big Four” has to be the current Winnipeg Jets logo. Everything else? The first Winnipeg Jets logo with a jet only included a silhouette of a passanger jet. The logo that replaced that just used a super basic geometric shape to represent a jet. The NY football team had a similar history. The first Jets logo was a silhouette of a passenger jet. Then they went to the Namath logo. Then an italicized wordmark of the word JETS with a triangle to represent a jet. Then the updated Namath logo. Also? Both versions of the Namath logo use a NY so maybe a NY logo for the Jets isn’t so bad an idea Anyhow. Most concepts that include an actual jet opt for a cartoon fighter jet. Which is fine, for a cartoon. Not so good for a logo. Which is where the Winnipeg Jets logo works. It’s not a super detailed jet. It’s only got two colours. Two shades of grey actually. The silhouette is well designed though. It looks like a jet without all the extra aggressive detailing a lot of Jets concepts give their jet logos. Honestly? The best concept for a NY Jets helmet that uses an actual jet was taken by the Memphis Express in the AAF. So yeah. Use the NY logo. Maybe work in the triangle from the 80s/early 90s logo to get your “jet” representation in. And leave it at that.
  8. That’s the thing. He’s great as the guy who comes into a team that needs a kick in the ass. Then the hardass thing wears thin and before you know it everyone’s tired of him. That’s never been his strong suit. Better opponents have been coaching circles around him for years.
  9. That’s about right. Tortorella has a shelf-life of 3-5 years for any team before the lockeroom just gets fed up with hardass schtick and tunes him out. Happened in Tampa, happened in New York. Never even got started in Vancouver, but that was fun for other reasons. Realistically? The Jackets are about where they should be on the Torts Progression Scale.
  10. Also...as much as I’m enjoying the AAF thus far? Expansion should be three years away. Relocation is fine, but expansion at this stage would be a mistake. They need to let things settle and stabilize before expanding.
  11. Obviously kids can just wear blank pads. They don't get designs until they make it to the Juniors. That's part of paying your dues and looking professional, young man. Tongue planted firmly in cheek of course, but come on. Since when was there an uprising against the notion of goalies having a bit of fun with their look? This kinda came out of nowhere. And not just them! Olaf Kölzig was "Zilla," and even inspired the one custom painted mask I ever had. Beyond the elite though...if anyone still remembers Brian Heyward it's probably because he had the greatest San Jose Sharks goalie mask of all time. Or Trevor Kidd. Would anyone remember him if it weren't for his crazy checker board pad design? I mean Trevor Kidd didn't accomplish much of note in the NHL, but those pads were part of his look and he left an impression. So much so that Leafs goalie prospect Garret Sparks paid homage to him. Trevor ing Kidd, guys! That's the power of a unique look for a goalie And people saying goalie pads should be plainer...would Artus Irbe's legendary dirty plain pads look, created over the years as he wore the same white pads from team to team, have become as notable if everyone else around him was forced to tone it down in the name of suffocating fun?
  12. Two things come to mind. The first is that the jagged pattern in the ice of the C, as well as the shards, lend to the orca logo's "aggressive" 90s look. I think anyone who's trying to imply it has a classic quality akin to a logo designed in 1975 or earlier is kidding themselves. The linework, above-mentioned jaggedness, the extra keyline...it all marks the logo as a product of its time. That time being the mid/late 1990s. This isn't a bad thing mind you. It really isn't. Just don't try to sell it to me as anything else Secondly...I admit your point is kind of lost on me. I mean I get it, but it seems to run contrary to something else you said. You're saying here that the orca logo is good, because it's very much like that piece of indigenous artwork and not overtly agressive. Ok, but didn't you also say the original Seahawks logo falls short for being too reminiscent of indigenous art? And that the the updated Seahawks logo was better for being more aggressive/distinct compared to the source material? I'm just trying to figure out the metric here. Is it better or worse to be faithful to the art being invoked? When is it ok to add some extra 90s-style aggression and when is it not?
  13. It's a specialized skill set that's going to be emphasized or deemphasized depending on the goalie you have. Some goalies, even great ones, jst It's REALLY not a core thing though. The most you need to know as a goalie is to know how to stop a puck wrapping around the boards and get a pass off. Or just leave it for your teammate to pick up. I mean it's not exactly on the level as getting in sync with your fellow d-man or your wingers Or a QB getting timing down with his backs or recievers, to go back to that earlier comparison.
  14. Not really, no. Granted, I've never been a QB, but I've followed football long enough to know a QB needs to practice with his receivers and backs to form a connection of sorts. If you're a QB? You and your receivers and backs need to get your timing right. Your receivers need to know where to be. They need to know where you're going to put the ball on any one route. And likewise you need to know how fast they are, what their reach is, where you need to put the ball to give them the best chance at catching it. With backs? Timing needs to likewise be perfect with the backs both to get a handoff off as seamlessly as possible but also to perfectly sell the trick play. In short? The QB works with his receivers and backs both in the game as a unit (much like a three man offensive line in hockey) and in practice to form a sense of timing...a repartee if you will. Again, I would liken a QB to a hockey centre, working with his line mates. With a goaltender? You're on your own. In practice? You have your own drills, often separate from the rest of the team. When you are involved with the team? You're there to, essentially, be the stand-in for the goalie your teammates will face on gameday. You're not working to establish trust and timing with your teammates. You're just a body in net for them to run drills on. And that's perfectly fine, because they provide practice for you too. They're stand-ins for the players you're going to face on gameday. A hockey drill that involves the whole team is a unique thing, because the skaters and goalies are sort of in their own bubbles. Fine-tuning their skills in opposition. Only skaters have their wingmen or D partners to rely on and work with. You've just got yourself as a goalie. You'd think there's be more interplay between goaltenders and defenders, but there isn't, really. You don't spend practices getting to know each others' strengths. Defencemen work with their partners on D. You? You just sort of trust them to do their job and they trust you to do your job. It's, as I said, isolated. Far more so than a QB ever could be. I never said anyone impugned the valour of goaltenders. I do think, however, that the idea that goalie helmets be plain and unassuming comes from a place of ignorance about both the position and the sort of people who gravitate towards it. There's a reason why custom mask design has been a thing as long as there have been masks. The very nature of the position invites individualism in a way no other position in sports really does. See to me that just kind of seems wild. Like...goalie pads having the design of a sock was actually a joke we had back when we were kids because that would be wacky, right? Hell, I credit the look of Felix Potvin's pads and mask for me wanting to be a goalie in the first place.That look influenced me so much that when Louisville came out with this style of pad that hankered back to Potvin's design? I saved up allowance, pay from my part-time job, and birthday cheques for a few years just to get a pair. I was so enamoured with those things I even used the model name as my handle on some site where nerds go on about sock stripes or some crap I still have them too! I would even say that it's a bad thing that pad design has devolved to "everyone wears white pads with shards of colour" because back when I was a kid? Roy, Brodeur, Potvin, CuJo, Hasek, Belfour, Kölzig...they all had signature "looks." Not just the masks, but the pads. I remember it being a legitimate conversation with other goalies at my local rink when Roy traded in his old Koho pads for a new look. And again when CCM bought out Heaton and suddenly Kölzig and Brodeur went from their custom Heaton looks to this weird CCM co-branding. It was mind-boggling because CCM didn't make goalie gear! Only now they did and CCM was now taking over Heaton's stuff? And then this happened. So now Heaton, which was a huge player in the goalie gear world, was just gone! What did that mean? As kids? We all flocked to the pro shop to see the new stuff in the catalogues every time something like this happened. What were the new designs? What did the colour combinations look like? What NHL goalie would be wearing what come next season? /IceCapReminiscing Now most pads, across all manufacturers, are a bit same-y. At least masks are still unique though. Which is good, because it's so central to the individualistic streak goaltenders have by necessity.