kroywen

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Everything posted by kroywen

  1. It's the brand new Tappan Zee Bridge from Westchester to Rockland, about 20 miles north of the City. Or sorry, the Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge. Because Cuomo wants this thing to be his legacy and decided to name it after Daddy. It's a rather pretty bridge, though not nearly as gorgeous or iconic as the GWB, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Williamsburg, Triborough, or even Verrazano Bridges. But hey, it's Cuomo's pet project, so why not put it on our plates rather than one of New York's world famous bridges? (If we want Cuomo's true legacy on there, I'd vote for a subway car stuck behind a track fire, filled to the brim with angry commuters. That should win a Plate of the Year award.)
  2. I voted for #2. Reminds me of the classic Statue of Liberty plates from the 90's. #5 would be my second choice. (Not coincidentally, that one echoes the 2000's plates.) I also suspect this is some vote splitting gambit to get Daddy's Bridge on the plate, but fortunately I'm not sure a single soul not named Cuomo is voting for those plates.
  3. I'd agree that the numbers are worth incorporating into an updated Brewers identity. I think they'd go with the Yount script (they'd have to be paired with that - they wouldn't go at all with the current Brewers script or the plain sans serif wordmark).
  4. I do think that font would get dated pretty quickly. All it would take is a change in design trends among microbrews to become dated. And it looks awfully similar to what the Astros have done. I'd much rather see the Brewers mine from one of their previous looks, rather than introduce yet another look into their franchise's history. The Robin Yount script, perhaps without the tail, should be it, IMO: The Brewers have had a number of quality looks in their history, including the Motre Bame look. I'd much rather see them modernize one of those than introduce something completely new, and take one more step toward becoming the Padres of the Midwest.
  5. Not bad looking on the field, but still such a downgrade from the pre-Nike uniforms (given that Nike utterly botched the green fabric on the homes). And why do so few players know how to wear their socks? There's three vastly different sock styles just in this photo - a thin strip of green followed by way too much white, almost the entire calf covered in green followed by a bunched up white sock above the shoe, and the correct half green-half white look. The NFL is getting almost as bad as baseball with this. And don't get me started on the biker pants going on in the back there.
  6. I am usually not a fan of gradients, but it really, really works here. Interesting concept, and great execution. I'm beginning to wonder whether we're about to see the return of the gradient in design. I hope not, as I'm not a huge fan, but these things move in cycles, and it seems like gradients are about to make a comeback.
  7. I'm glad the Yanks are on the road that weekend, because the idea of the Yankees in an all-white jersey without pinstripes is just vomit-inducing.
  8. Delete the colon. That'll resolve any potential confusion. And without "Project" in capitals, the colon really doesn't even work. It doesn't carry the visual of filling in a field on a form with "Cold Case" without it being capitalized. I'd just go with "Project Cold Case" and use the PCC initialism publicly.
  9. People are going to be looking for mustard, pass by this, not even think it's mustard, and angrily buy something else thinking that their preferred Gulden's isn't being carried. (Or they don't have a strong brand loyalty and will just go for the first mustard-y looking thing on the shelf... which this is not.) Guaranteed this lasts less than a year. I have a feeling they're trying to eliminate the sometimes weird-looking look of a partially empty mustard bottle, with mustard smears on the sides of it, without replicating French's famous yellow bottle, but this isn't the way to do that. It doesn't look like the product being sold.
  10. Pete Alonso is the modern-day Justin Morneau. The fact that Justin Morneau is no longer considered modern-day makes me feel ancient, FWIW.
  11. I usually find the HR Derby to be fun, but I'm barely paying attention to it this year. The production on it is just terrible. Way too much visual and audio clutter. And is it me, or do the announcers sound completely unexcited? One other problem - I don't like all these interviews during the action. Takes the attention off the action. This event needs an announcer hyping it up, not blandly interviewing someone else while homers are being hit in the background.
  12. This. Gray is a color that works with every single uniform in baseball - it's completely neutral. Powder blue is not. Hence why there's a misconception that powder blue was once a Phillies color, or that it was a Royals color (to the point that they revived powder blue as an alternate home uniform). Also, they frankly look like hospital scrubs: It's a terrible color for a sports uniform when done head-to-toe. Fine as a top paired with white pants, but the head to toe look belongs in a hospital, not on a ballfield.
  13. Guaranteed F.U. money is hard to resist. But it's terrible for baseball, frankly. This guy deserves to be showcased on a successful team, not wasting away on a second fiddle LA team that can't get out of its own way.
  14. Back off topic: I'd contend that there's a legitimate rivalry between SF and LA that goes beyond sports. They're stuck, by an accident of history, in the same state, competing for the same resources and tax dollars, and historically, competing over being the West Coast's preeminent city. (It was SF from the time of the gold rush until probably the rise of the movie industry in Hollywood, shifted down to LA with the concentration of the entertainment industry there, and is probably right now in the process of shifting more toward SF due to the tech boom, and the movie/music industries being less concentrated in LA.) There's a whole urban versus suburban, tech versus entertainment, hipsters versus trendy people, etc., thing going on there, that I think stretches beyond sports. Boston versus New York? There's definitely some rivalry there outside of sports, though it's primarily a sports-fueled rivalry. But there's a palpable difference in attitudes between the two cities, with each one having a strange mix of admiration and disdain for the other. Growing up in Connecticut (and well within the Tri-State area), there was definitely a little identity crisis in our neck of the woods between wanting to be stereotypical quaint New England towns, and touting our great access to the nation's biggest metropolis. So I think that plays into the Boston/New York thing a little, but it's mostly a sports thing (give truth serum to most New Yorkers and they'll tell you they secretly love going to Boston... and vice versa). Neither of these top Toronto/Montreal though, if for no other reason than there's no gigantic language or cultural difference in our country as there is in Canada.
  15. They were folded into Mercedes' brand in 2013, and then revived as "Mercedes-Maybach" in 2015. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maybach And I drooled over one for a solid 10 minutes at the New York International Auto Show this year. I wouldn't associate it with failure; I'd associate it with prestige.
  16. Huge upgrade. And I think "Jamba" is strong enough to stand on its own without the "Juice." Stronger, in fact, from a branding perspective.
  17. This is the best concept I've seen yet, but none are on the level of the current livery. Don't see the need to change something so recognizable and iconic.
  18. On the surface, it's a good, albeit generic, livery. It'll get confused at a distance with a thousand airlines out there - Delta, British, US Airways, etc. Nothing distinctive about it, though nothing bad about it either. But I can't be the only one who thinks Air Force One is an absolute design classic. A perfect slice of 1960s Americana that holds up extraordinarily well today. Much like Dodger Stadium, which features some similar colors. It's recognizable the world over, and very unique. I'd imagine whoever Trump's successor is - should that person be a Democrat - will wind up changing it back to this color scheme to get away from what'll inevitably be known as the "Trump livery."
  19. They seem to be headed in that direction. Either that, or a Brewers-esque permanent dual brand in order to milk merchandise dollars. I'm actually hoping for the latter. It makes for horrible branding ( Brewers), but I honestly prefer the forest green-and-gold color scheme. Much like the White Sox, it took nearly a century to get there, but they finally struck gold (no pun intended) with a uniform set that can stand the test of time in the late 80's - I hope they have the good sense to stick with it.
  20. Give me or give me death. But yes, of those two versions of the late-80s Metrodome wordmark, the red beats the blue any day. But that wordmark is so sterile and dated either way, IMO. Do some tightening up on the script wordmark, and you've got yourself the platonic ideal of a Twins jersey.
  21. And that's how a redesign is done. Still recognizable, well designed, and very scalable to their respective uses. (I'm sticking with Chrome though.)
  22. And there's a good reason the CBA is written that way - it gives both the team and baseball a chance to fully investigate the situation, and allow due process to play out, before any final decisions are made. Frankly, it's how the rest of the world should operate - if someone is accused, put them on administrative leave, investigate the situation, and try to determine the best course of action based on the preponderance of the evidence. Don't tolerate those who commit acts of domestic violence or sexual assault, but at least allow for due process before calling for their heads.
  23. I generally love the existing Oakland A's forest green and gold color scheme (it's one of my favorite color schemes in sports), but kelly green paired with gold seems to fit LA far better than forest green would. Seems very SoCal to me - brighter shades, vibrant colors, very 60s/70s without looking dated. It works so well. And I love the interlocking LA, moreso than the existing "A's" monogram. My favorite "what if" in sports, to be honest. While watching the Dodgers/Mets game last night - a matchup between a team that ditched NYC and a team that exists only because the former ditched NYC - my wife and I were talking about how different baseball would be today had the Dodgers stayed in NYC. And we came to realize that our own lives may be very different today - her grandfather grew up a huge Dodgers fan, and never really latched on to the Mets. My wife wound up a Yankees fan since her family was 'homeless' in terms of fandom for decades, but she likely would've inherited Dodgers fandom from her grandfather had they stayed in NYC. Part of what brought my wife and I together was our shared love of the Yankees, and watching/going to games together - that very well may not have happened had she been a Dodgers fan. So in a strange way, the Dodgers leaving Brooklyn four decades before I was born may have contributed to me meeting my wife, in some circuitous way. Anyway, totally off-topic tangent, but I guess it shows how impactful those relocations were, even in unexpected ways decades later.
  24. I get what you're going for with the LA Athletics concept, but I think there's way too many competing colors. Red, green, and gold are all very strong colors, and you add white to the mix (rather than allowing gold to be the 'neutral' light color), and the colors all wind up competing and clashing with one another. To be honest, the red jersey reminds me on the Pirates' infamous red vest - it looks like red was shoehorned into what's otherwise a very nice dark-color-and-gold identity. The Philadelphia Athletics identity, on the other hand, is sheer perfection. To the point that I wish the A's stayed in Philly as the long-dominant team in that city, and we got to see that identity to come fruition in reality. It'd be considered as classic today as many of the surviving 'original 16' teams' identities.