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Found 3 results

  1. After I posted last week about the St. Louis Browns and their design overhaul in the late 1930's, this was the inevitable outcome. It all started by trying to recreate the diamond "B" design in that 1937 photo. That gradually turned into what the team would have looked like if they had stayed in St. Louis a little longer. I wanted to stick with a more traditional feel, so the early 60's made sense. After the diamond badge was done, I settled on the wordmark. The font gives it a sort of light-hearted feel without the impish elf. The dramatic drop shadow is meant to evoke the Browns' look from the early 40's (and in my humble opinion the best colored headspoon of all time). Some teams use birds on a bat. Others have white cleats. In my mind, that multi-colored button placket is the franchise's signature element. It made sense to me it would be retained to some degree through the generations. The monogram on the chest of the road jersey is a subtle shout-out to my hometown Giants' road jerseys of the 80's. And then there's the hats. The home version is a nod to the team's caps of the late 30's with the seam piping. The road cap is a more direct connection to one of the team's final caps before they flew to Baltimore. All in all, some modernized touches to the Browns' identity. As always, comments and critiques are appreciated. Thanks for taking a glance. Browns References
  2. I've always had an odd fascination with the old St. Louis Browns. Partially because of their historic ineptitude on the field, but mostly due to the intriguing lack of a strong visual identity. Much like their NFL counterparts, the team primarily relied on text-based logos and monograms throughout most of their history. Recently, I was browsing the book, St. Louis Browns: The Story of a Beloved Team, and came across the image below. The caption says it's from 1937 when new Browns owner Donald Barnes launched a campaign that included fan submissions to find a new logo for the team. They'd eventually settle on a pretty nice looking shield. But all the various options presented are pretty astounding, especially for that era. There's plenty of elfin options, perhaps foreshadowing the only real graphical caricature the team would officially adopt in their final years before packing up for Baltimore. Others that suggest a completely different team identity like the anchor and rope mark just above Bill DeWitt's head (man on the left), silhouette of two bears(?) on top of a ball, a griffin(?), a bulldog and something with a "Brown-Eagles" crest. Most bizarre of the bunch by far has to be the disembodied bulging arm wielding a bat. A few more options feature generalized baseball imagery. Swinging batters, balls and bats feature prominently. Personally, my favorites are the stylized "B" inside the diamond behind DeWitt, the scrawling "Brownies" wordmark between the two men and the art deco style wordmark on top of the bat in the dead center. Even the "Browns" inside the circle around the swinging batter isn't bad. It has a sort of baseball equivalence to the Cleveland Browns plain football helmet logo. Anyways, thought this was an especially interesting behind the scenes look at the design process for an underwhelming 1930's baseball team. Would a more "exciting" logo have kept the team from moving to Baltimore? No way. But it's fun to think what could have been.
  3. Hey all, Long-time lurker of the site and forums, first-time poster. Like a lot of people the shelter-in-place has led to much more hobby time than I ever could have imagined. So I tried my hand at designing a uniform for a fictional team in my hometown. It quickly evolved into a full eight-team league. I'm definitely no artist and cobbled together a few designs off a reworked jersey template I found through Google Search, a hat template from @Htown1141 and a pant & stirrup template of my own design. The designs themselves were inspired by what I've been watching during the quarantine including a ton of old World Series films on YouTube, a lot of When It Was a Game/Flagstaff Films clips and "The Natural." So we have a Single-A minor league set in 1939 in the Bay Area known as the Coastal Fog League. The league logo is below and not a masterpiece by any means, but meant to evoke the blend of California's sunny climate and the infamous fog that likes to roll in on summer evenings around San Francisco Bay. San Bruno Seals - San Francisco's team reappears in the suburbs First team up is the genesis for all this, from my hometown. Inspired by the legendary San Francisco Seals, we'll suspend belief and pretend that the Pacific Coast League version lost the war for fans to the Mission Reds, hence the name being available for a Single-A team. The chest logo mimics the classic mark from the real Seals of the Joe DiMaggio era, which in turn borrowed from the White Sox of the 1910-20's. I went for a basic, but different color scheme of green and white simply because green is my favorite color. I've always had a fondness for teams of the 20's and 30's that had logoless white home or gray road caps with piping, so that was a must and an element that'll come back again. This road cap was inspired by the real Seals logo cap from ~1939 with a slightly different take on the logo. Another detail from that era was a solid-colored button placket. Had to include that sharp looking (but dubious) Baseball Centennial patch. The other patch is a nod to the actual San Bruno city seal and plays off the various city-related patches of this era. This simple Boston anniversary design came to mind. And I wanted to do a set with white road stirrups. I'm not fully sure it works, but it has a vaguely White Sox feel to it. Comments and critiques are definitely welcome for someone dipping into this for the first time. Seals References
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