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Found 6 results

  1. Before I'm away for the weekend, I thought I'd leave you with this new design and a few thoughts. I was recently inspired to draw-up a falcon image and while working it out I chose to think metacognitively about my process. What follows are a list of some of the thoughts that were........thunk. 1. Lets see what a falcon looks like Search for falcon images 2. Falcons have big eyes and a small beak compared to eagles and hawks, that's a distiguishing feature Draw out the shape of a basic falcon head 3. An angled pose would be most dynamic Search falcon in stoop or stooping falcon stooping is a funny word Add more slant to composition 4. They almost have an innocent look to them 5. Try to keep some of the innocent look 6. I wanna keep that ring around the eye, that's a distiguishing feature 7. Since the eye doesn't have much anger, what makes them scary? They are FAST..... lightning shapes They have a black colored eye... no yellow in the eye itself like hawks and eagles, that's a distiguishing feature Search falcon screeching 8. Erase closed beak, draw in open mouth 9. Keep dark portion of beak, that's a distiguishing feature 10. Work in the dark shape in the feather colors on the face 11. Huh, that doesn't look half bad References used:
  2. Monday, May 6, 1878 – Chicago, Illinois In 1878 the sporting goods equipment and retail business of Albert Spalding was thriving. As his wealth began to grow due to the business of sport, Spalding looked for every opportunity he could to foster the love of athletics in every American. Baseball was and remained his first love but his motive to diversify the love of sport caused him to look for other games he might elevate in stature. One game he found was the Swiss game of Hornussen. Spalding found the game fascinating and he felt that if he could get Americans to love the game as well it was one that would require its practitioners to purchase equipment; equipment he could sale to them. Thus Spalding resolved to organize a professional Hornussen league in the United States. He called the league the Professional Hornussen Players League (PHPL). He decided he would serve as the league’s first commissioner and he would sale four franchises. The charter of the league that he wrote stated that franchise owners would be fully proprietary, maintaining near complete control of their clubs. The first franchise he sold was to his friend William Hulbert. Hulbert was the owner of the baseball Chicago White Stockings. He wanted to name his Hornussen club the White Stockings as well but Spalding did not like this. He wanted his league to be distinct from any baseball league. Spalding suggested the name Pioneers to Hulbert and that stuck. Spalding remembered the name from the Rockford Pioneers, the first baseball team he ever played for. So William Hulbert’s team will play in Chicago and they will be called the Chicago Pioneers. The second franchise was sold to Morgan Bulkeley. Bulkeley was brought into the league by the suggestion of William Hulbert. He, along with Spalding and Hulbert, was a long time and early organizer of baseball. Bulkeley decided he would place his team in his hometown of Hartford, Connecticut. Outside of sports Bulkeley was interested in politics. As the league was organizing he was beginning to lay the foundation for his political career. Like many northerners at this time he was an avid fan of Abraham Lincoln and the 16th Presidents party the Republicans. In tribute to Lincoln, Bulkeley named his team the Hartford Republicans. The third franchise sold was purchased by Bob “Death to Flying Things” Ferguson. Ferguson was a player/manager in baseball and had worked for Morgan Bulkeley previously. He had also worked as a league director in the original National League. After purchasing his own team, Bulkeley talked Ferguson into picking up the third franchise in the league. Although Ferguson was very busy traveling with Chicago White Stockings at the time, he decided to place his team in his hometown of Brooklyn, New York. For a nickname he decided to dub his club the Brooklyn Swats. The name served as both an homage to his nickname as well as serving as a fitting name for a team in a sport where players attempt to swat a flying flute out of the sky. Finally Albert Spalding sold the fourth franchise. He got sports journalist Henry Chadwick to take ownership of the franchise. Chadwick decided to place the team New York City and call the club the New York Clippers. He gained inspiration for the name from the magazine that he was working for at the time, The New York Clipper.
  3. I think there should be a professional volleyball league. Well, I'm already making one. Although the project might take a while to work on (it's inspired by Veras' AFA), this project will be quite interesting. In the meantime, before I start designing uniforms, let's give you guys a backstory. The roots of the MLV go back to 1919, when the New York Volleyball League was established, beginning with 6 teams in Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, and 2 teams in New York City. Among those 6 teams, they would lay the foundation for what would become the MLV. In 1921, the NYVL added the Philadelphia Liberty from the Keystone League, who would be the first expansion team and the first team to not play in the state of New York. But let's not get too detailed. Over time, the league added more teams outside of New York, and eventually, especially during the Great Depression, many teams from New York would either fold or move. (Such as the Albany Dukes moving to Pittsburgh.) By 1940, the league was known as the American Men's Volleyball League, and had boiled down to 10 teams, those teams being based in New York, Brooklyn, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Detroit, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, Boston, and Chicago. But at the same time, a new competition had begun. The National Women's Volleyball Association had begun, also with 10 teams, some of them in the same cities as AMVL teams. A battle between the 2 leagues would be held every year starting in 1946, in the battle for what is now known as the Coed Cup. In 1955, the 2 leagues sort-of merged, creating the MLV. Since then, several teams have relocated to different areas, and the league has also expanded all over the country, even with one team in Toronto. But that's that. I'll be working on more stuff soon, and I hope you liked the backstory.
  4. What are your favorite color schemes? This doesn't necessarily mean how they integrate the schemes into the logos and/or uniforms, just the combinations of colors themselves. Here are a few of mine: NFL---Dolphins, Redskins, Packers, Broncos (1980s-1996) NBA---Hornets (original and current), Hornets (during their New Orleans time), Bucks (1980s "Irish Rainbow"), Nuggets (rainbow), Nuggets (current), Spurs (1990s "fiesta" color scheme; would've been great to see them do something with it on their uniforms), Mavericks (original), Suns (pre-2000s, loved when they had black to go with purple and orange) MLB---Phillies (one of the best red-white-and-blue combos, and if you consider cream part of it it's awesome), Giants/Orioles (black and orange look great in baseball), Diamondbacks (pre-2007), Padres (1970s-1980s, brown, yellow, and orange together), Royals, Athletics, Mariners NHL---Mighty Ducks (original), Islanders, Rangers, Wild, Blackhawks, Canucks (current), Flyers, Bruins (when they wore brown instead of black) College---Virginia Tech, Ohio State, Coastal Carolina, Florida Gulf Coast, Florida State, Temple (pre-black), Tulsa, Tulane, Clemson, Arizona (when you include copper), Central Michigan, Indiana, Indiana State (before they made their shade of blue more generic), Bowling Green
  5. With the Professional Futsal League the Premier Futsal league in America set to launch in 2016 I have thought about Suggestions for PFL Teams For this you can submit your own Team Name,Logo and Jersey it can be handwritten or can be designed in another way also you need to select the city of your own PFL to be based in. Submissions for An PFL Team Team Name Logo and Jersey are open to anyone except spammers.
  6. Hi All As I have been member on here for a year now, I thought it was about time I put my head on the chopping block. For my first attempt, I have delved into the realms of pure fantasy by creating an 8 team English Professional Baseball League. First up is the League Logo and if that looks ok, I'll add a couple of teams.