JasonFromMiami

Uniform numbers that look bad

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Gardner wearing #98 as a QB is easily the worst number ever. I get that Michigan does the honor the past thing, but the best they could come up with was 98 for their QB? How about honoring Rick Leach and giving Gardner #7? Or Jim Harbaugh and #4? Granted, neither of those two won the Heisman like Harmon did but still.

Charles Woodson wore #2 and won the Heisman. I'm sure they didn't give it to Gardner because two players already had it, but that seems like it would've been the ideal option to me.

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I started my high school hockey career with #3 because I was originally a defenseman, but my coach moved me to forward during my sophomore year. I wanted to switch numbers, but my parents didn't want to have buy two new jerseys so I always felt like a dork with a single digit number playing left wing. I doubt anyone noticed, but it bothered me for two and a half years.

I've played and coached hockey my whole life at a pretty high level and have never heard of jersey number restrictions in hockey. I have defenseman on my team that wear #34 and #42. Goalies are 1, 30, 31, 32, and 33...because those jerseys are goalie jerseys. I've had teammates and players who've worn single digit numbers and been forwards. I guess I'm kinda wondering where this stems from?

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Have there been actual rules about who can wear which numbers in the modern era, let alone into the 90s?

The only actual rule I can recall is the one that outlawed 0 and 00. I don't think there was an actual written rule saying that Hasek couldn't have worn #9, I think it was more of an unwritten thing.

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Has there ever been an NHL skater that wore #1? I think that would look really odd (referencing by above lamenting that goalies don't wear it a lot anymore and the stupid Wild retired it for stupid reasons).

I think that would be a "number that looks bad" or at least weird.

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Since we're on the topic of goalie numbers...I wore 96 as a goalie when I was younger. I don't think it's ever been worn by a goalie. I know a few skaters have worn it though.

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I started my high school hockey career with #3 because I was originally a defenseman, but my coach moved me to forward during my sophomore year. I wanted to switch numbers, but my parents didn't want to have buy two new jerseys so I always felt like a dork with a single digit number playing left wing. I doubt anyone noticed, but it bothered me for two and a half years.

I've played and coached hockey my whole life at a pretty high level and have never heard of jersey number restrictions in hockey. I have defenseman on my team that wear #34 and #42. Goalies are 1, 30, 31, 32, and 33...because those jerseys are goalie jerseys. I've had teammates and players who've worn single digit numbers and been forwards. I guess I'm kinda wondering where this stems from?

More like unwritten rules and not everybody follows them. Obviously there are exceptions (Gordie Howe, Phil Esposito, Teemu Selanne (who also wore #13 for 5 years)), but I think most single digit numbers at the NHL level are worn by defensemen, while forwards tend to stick with double digits, and most goalies wear either #1 or a number in the 30's. I wouldn't call them restrictions. I'd call them number suggestions.

The Blue Jackets have only three players on the NHL roster who wear single digits - all defensemen. The Ducks, chosen at random, have 5 players who wear a single digit number. 4 of the 5 are defensemen.

of course the biggest tool in CBJ team history, Jeff Carter, wore #7 while playing center, which is just another reason I couldn't stand him during and after his tenure with the team.

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I started my high school hockey career with #3 because I was originally a defenseman, but my coach moved me to forward during my sophomore year. I wanted to switch numbers, but my parents didn't want to have buy two new jerseys so I always felt like a dork with a single digit number playing left wing. I doubt anyone noticed, but it bothered me for two and a half years.

I've played and coached hockey my whole life at a pretty high level and have never heard of jersey number restrictions in hockey. I have defenseman on my team that wear #34 and #42. Goalies are 1, 30, 31, 32, and 33...because those jerseys are goalie jerseys. I've had teammates and players who've worn single digit numbers and been forwards. I guess I'm kinda wondering where this stems from?

More like unwritten rules and not everybody follows them. Obviously there are exceptions (Gordie Howe, Phil Esposito, Teemu Selanne (who also wore #13 for 5 years)), but I think most single digit numbers at the NHL level are worn by defensemen, while forwards tend to stick with double digits, and most goalies wear either #1 or a number in the 30's. I wouldn't call them restrictions. I'd call them number suggestions.

The Blue Jackets have only three players on the NHL roster who wear single digits - all defensemen. The Ducks, chosen at random, have 5 players who wear a single digit number. 4 of the 5 are defensemen.

of course the biggest tool in CBJ team history, Jeff Carter, wore #7 while playing center, which is just another reason I couldn't stand him during and after his tenure with the team.

#9 Left Wing right here. I'm pretty sure you are over thinking all of this. A number is a number in hockey, it doesn't designate position. And also considering most youth programs only have numbers 1-19 usually available, single digits are worn by everyone because usually 2-9 were smalls and 10-19 we mediums with 1 and 30 in a goalie cut.

I think you're going all Russell Crowe in A Brilliant Mind on us. (Ya I know it's a true story)

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Ovechkin, Kariya, Aurie, Oates, Broten....so many great forwards wore single digits....

Modano

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Ovechkin, Kariya, Aurie, Oates, Broten....so many great forwards wore single digits....

Modano

#7...this was my favorite player as a kid and I suppose remains so today. That's why I never really thought of single-digit numbers as for defensemen only

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Don't know if this was mentioned yet, but I couldn't believe you guys forgot about goalies wearing #20. Definitely, the most famous to do that was this guy:

vladislav-tretiak-e1269430828906.jpg

Vladislav Tretiak

But, there have been others, including:

ed_belfour_2007_01_20.jpgbelfour.jpgbelfour.jpgtumblr_inline_ne2v7dQjIA1sx5rz5.jpg

Ed Belfour

Evgeni+Nabokov+Nashville+Predators+v+NewSan+Jose+Sharks+v+Dallas+Stars+Game+Six+

evgeni-nabokov-nhl-tampa-bay-lightning-c

Evgeni Nabokov

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I started my high school hockey career with #3 because I was originally a defenseman, but my coach moved me to forward during my sophomore year. I wanted to switch numbers, but my parents didn't want to have buy two new jerseys so I always felt like a dork with a single digit number playing left wing. I doubt anyone noticed, but it bothered me for two and a half years.

I've played and coached hockey my whole life at a pretty high level and have never heard of jersey number restrictions in hockey. I have defenseman on my team that wear #34 and #42. Goalies are 1, 30, 31, 32, and 33...because those jerseys are goalie jerseys. I've had teammates and players who've worn single digit numbers and been forwards. I guess I'm kinda wondering where this stems from?

More like unwritten rules and not everybody follows them. Obviously there are exceptions (Gordie Howe, Phil Esposito, Teemu Selanne (who also wore #13 for 5 years)), but I think most single digit numbers at the NHL level are worn by defensemen, while forwards tend to stick with double digits, and most goalies wear either #1 or a number in the 30's. I wouldn't call them restrictions. I'd call them number suggestions.

The Blue Jackets have only three players on the NHL roster who wear single digits - all defensemen. The Ducks, chosen at random, have 5 players who wear a single digit number. 4 of the 5 are defensemen.

of course the biggest tool in CBJ team history, Jeff Carter, wore #7 while playing center, which is just another reason I couldn't stand him during and after his tenure with the team.

#9 Left Wing right here. I'm pretty sure you are over thinking all of this. A number is a number in hockey, it doesn't designate position. And also considering most youth programs only have numbers 1-19 usually available, single digits are worn by everyone because usually 2-9 were smalls and 10-19 we mediums with 1 and 30 in a goalie cut.

I think you're going all Russell Crowe in A Brilliant Mind on us. (Ya I know it's a true story)

Ovechkin, Kariya, Aurie, Oates, Broten....so many great forwards wore single digits....

Modano

Hence why I said there are number suggestions, obvious exceptions, that it's more of an unwritten thing, and not hard and fast rules.

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I started my high school hockey career with #3 because I was originally a defenseman, but my coach moved me to forward during my sophomore year. I wanted to switch numbers, but my parents didn't want to have buy two new jerseys so I always felt like a dork with a single digit number playing left wing. I doubt anyone noticed, but it bothered me for two and a half years.

I've played and coached hockey my whole life at a pretty high level and have never heard of jersey number restrictions in hockey. I have defenseman on my team that wear #34 and #42. Goalies are 1, 30, 31, 32, and 33...because those jerseys are goalie jerseys. I've had teammates and players who've worn single digit numbers and been forwards. I guess I'm kinda wondering where this stems from?

More like unwritten rules and not everybody follows them. Obviously there are exceptions (Gordie Howe, Phil Esposito, Teemu Selanne (who also wore #13 for 5 years)), but I think most single digit numbers at the NHL level are worn by defensemen, while forwards tend to stick with double digits, and most goalies wear either #1 or a number in the 30's. I wouldn't call them restrictions. I'd call them number suggestions.

The Blue Jackets have only three players on the NHL roster who wear single digits - all defensemen. The Ducks, chosen at random, have 5 players who wear a single digit number. 4 of the 5 are defensemen.

of course the biggest tool in CBJ team history, Jeff Carter, wore #7 while playing center, which is just another reason I couldn't stand him during and after his tenure with the team.

#9 Left Wing right here. I'm pretty sure you are over thinking all of this. A number is a number in hockey, it doesn't designate position. And also considering most youth programs only have numbers 1-19 usually available, single digits are worn by everyone because usually 2-9 were smalls and 10-19 we mediums with 1 and 30 in a goalie cut.

I think you're going all Russell Crowe in A Brilliant Mind on us. (Ya I know it's a true story)

Ovechkin, Kariya, Aurie, Oates, Broten....so many great forwards wore single digits....

Modano

Hence why I said there are number suggestions, obvious exceptions, that it's more of an unwritten thing, and not hard and fast rules.

I have no idea what you're talking about anymore.

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Don't know if this was mentioned yet, but I couldn't believe you guys forgot about goalies wearing #20.

Oh yes...I HATE that. I always associate that number with the guy in my avatar (Dino Cicarrelli)

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I started my high school hockey career with #3 because I was originally a defenseman, but my coach moved me to forward during my sophomore year. I wanted to switch numbers, but my parents didn't want to have buy two new jerseys so I always felt like a dork with a single digit number playing left wing. I doubt anyone noticed, but it bothered me for two and a half years.

I've played and coached hockey my whole life at a pretty high level and have never heard of jersey number restrictions in hockey. I have defenseman on my team that wear #34 and #42. Goalies are 1, 30, 31, 32, and 33...because those jerseys are goalie jerseys. I've had teammates and players who've worn single digit numbers and been forwards. I guess I'm kinda wondering where this stems from?

More like unwritten rules and not everybody follows them. Obviously there are exceptions (Gordie Howe, Phil Esposito, Teemu Selanne (who also wore #13 for 5 years)), but I think most single digit numbers at the NHL level are worn by defensemen, while forwards tend to stick with double digits, and most goalies wear either #1 or a number in the 30's. I wouldn't call them restrictions. I'd call them number suggestions.

The Blue Jackets have only three players on the NHL roster who wear single digits - all defensemen. The Ducks, chosen at random, have 5 players who wear a single digit number. 4 of the 5 are defensemen.

of course the biggest tool in CBJ team history, Jeff Carter, wore #7 while playing center, which is just another reason I couldn't stand him during and after his tenure with the team.

#9 Left Wing right here. I'm pretty sure you are over thinking all of this. A number is a number in hockey, it doesn't designate position. And also considering most youth programs only have numbers 1-19 usually available, single digits are worn by everyone because usually 2-9 were smalls and 10-19 we mediums with 1 and 30 in a goalie cut.

I think you're going all Russell Crowe in A Brilliant Mind on us. (Ya I know it's a true story)

Ovechkin, Kariya, Aurie, Oates, Broten....so many great forwards wore single digits....

Modano

Hence why I said there are number suggestions, obvious exceptions, that it's more of an unwritten thing, and not hard and fast rules.

I have no idea what you're talking about anymore.

Look at NHL rosters right now - most single digit numbers are worn by defensemen. I also never claimed that one position has to wear a certain number. Just said that single digits tend to be worn primarily by defensive players. It's sort of an unwritten rule.

I chose the Dallas Stars and Chicago Blackhawks at random - The Stars have 5 single digit numbers - all worn by defensemen. The Blackhawks have 4 single digit numbers - worn exclusively by defensemen. I'm not making this up out of thin air.

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Edit: McCarthy beat me to it

Although, 2-6 (and numbers in the 20s) are defence numbers to me, while 7-9 I typically associate more with forwards.

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I started my high school hockey career with #3 because I was originally a defenseman, but my coach moved me to forward during my sophomore year. I wanted to switch numbers, but my parents didn't want to have buy two new jerseys so I always felt like a dork with a single digit number playing left wing. I doubt anyone noticed, but it bothered me for two and a half years.

I've played and coached hockey my whole life at a pretty high level and have never heard of jersey number restrictions in hockey. I have defenseman on my team that wear #34 and #42. Goalies are 1, 30, 31, 32, and 33...because those jerseys are goalie jerseys. I've had teammates and players who've worn single digit numbers and been forwards. I guess I'm kinda wondering where this stems from?

More like unwritten rules and not everybody follows them. Obviously there are exceptions
#9 Left Wing right here. I'm pretty sure you are over thinking all of this. A number is a number in hockey, it doesn't designate position. And also considering most youth programs only have numbers 1-19 usually available, single digits are worn by everyone because usually 2-9 were smalls and 10-19 we mediums with 1 and 30 in a goalie cut.

I think you're going all Russell Crowe in A Brilliant Mind on us. (Ya I know it's a true story)

Ovechkin, Kariya, Aurie, Oates, Broten....so many great forwards wore single digits....

Modano

Hence why I said there are number suggestions, obvious exceptions, that it's more of an unwritten thing, and not hard and fast rules.

I have no idea what you're talking about anymore.

I'm pretty sure you do know what he's talking about. My guess is you're just more interested in being dismissive because you "played and coached hockey at a 'high' level." FWIW, "A Beautiful Mind" was a Hollywood depiction of John Nash. It was based on a true story which means it wasn't exactly a "true story."

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I feel like when I was a kid, a lot more goalies did wear #1. I know the flyers have it retired, so maybe other teams have too since then.

I grew up with Ron Hdxtall wearing 27, which at the time I think made him the only non 1 or low-30s goalie. Ray LeBlanc had a cup of coffee with the Blackhawks (I think) and iirc wore 50, which looked weird but now I think would be a good goalie number.

I've always associated low single digits (at least 2-6) with defenseman, and 7-9 as either defense or forward. Not sure why but probably because Mark Recchi wore 8 and I was used to him, and Bill Barber was 7, and obviously Modano.

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I feel like when I was a kid, a lot more goalies did wear #1. I know the flyers have it retired, so maybe other teams have too since then.

I grew up with Ron Hdxtall wearing 27, which at the time I think made him the only non 1 or low-30s goalie. Ray LeBlanc had a cup of coffee with the Blackhawks (I think) and iirc wore 50, which looked weird but now I think would be a good goalie number.

I've always associated low single digits (at least 2-6) with defenseman, and 7-9 as either defense or forward. Not sure why but probably because Mark Recchi wore 8 and I was used to him, and Bill Barber was 7, and obviously Modano.

Gilles Meloche wore it in the early 1980s for the North Stars, as well. That's why I am OK with upper 20s, I guess.

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I started my high school hockey career with #3 because I was originally a defenseman, but my coach moved me to forward during my sophomore year. I wanted to switch numbers, but my parents didn't want to have buy two new jerseys so I always felt like a dork with a single digit number playing left wing. I doubt anyone noticed, but it bothered me for two and a half years.

I've played and coached hockey my whole life at a pretty high level and have never heard of jersey number restrictions in hockey. I have defenseman on my team that wear #34 and #42. Goalies are 1, 30, 31, 32, and 33...because those jerseys are goalie jerseys. I've had teammates and players who've worn single digit numbers and been forwards. I guess I'm kinda wondering where this stems from?

More like unwritten rules and not everybody follows them. Obviously there are exceptions

#9 Left Wing right here. I'm pretty sure you are over thinking all of this. A number is a number in hockey, it doesn't designate position. And also considering most youth programs only have numbers 1-19 usually available, single digits are worn by everyone because usually 2-9 were smalls and 10-19 we mediums with 1 and 30 in a goalie cut.

I think you're going all Russell Crowe in A Brilliant Mind on us. (Ya I know it's a true story)

Ovechkin, Kariya, Aurie, Oates, Broten....so many great forwards wore single digits....

Modano

Hence why I said there are number suggestions, obvious exceptions, that it's more of an unwritten thing, and not hard and fast rules.

I have no idea what you're talking about anymore.

I'm pretty sure you do know what he's talking about. My guess is you're just more interested in being dismissive because you "played and coached hockey at a 'high' level." FWIW, "A Beautiful Mind" was a Hollywood depiction of John Nash. It was based on a true story which means it wasn't exactly a "true story."

22 years of playing hockey and I have never heard of hockey number "unwritten rules". That's why I don't know understand what he's talking about. But thanks for being a dick.

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Show me a source that proves this "unwritten rule" that apparently everyone on here knows but no one I've spoken to in North Dakota or Minnesota knows about....

Because Google searches bring nothing of that nature up.

This did however:

Ice hockey does not have any formalized uniform numbering rules. Historically, in the National Hockey League, starting goaltenders wore Number 1, the backup goalie wore Number 30, and the other players (the "skaters") wore low numbers (generally Number 2 to Number 29).

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