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HS team forfeits playoff game for wearing pink


mjrbaseball

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A Los Angeles girls' basketball team was forced to forfeit a game for wearing pink-trimmed uniforms, denoting breast cancer awareness.

Narbonne High School won its conference semi-final game on Saturday. However, on Monday, conference officials vacated the win because the team's uniforms violated a conference rule. That rule says that all teams must wear uniforms in their official school colors. (Narbonne's colors are green and gold.)

However, on Wednesday, an appeals board overturned the original decision and let Narbonne's victory stand, meaning they can continue in the playoffs.

Narbonne's coach said she was not aware of the rule, and in fact the teams had worn pink earlier in the season. But she acknowledged that it was a violation, and accepted a suspension for the rest of the playoffs. She said as long as the team was not punished, she would sit out.


http://www.latimes.com/sports/highschool/la-sp-narbonne-disqualified-pink-20150304-story.html

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It's a bit of a silly resolution that the team has now lost their coach for the playoffs.

Obviously leagues have rules like this for a reason, and it's puzzling that the school and the league didn't communicate at all when the uniforms were conceived, because i'm sure the league would have allowed it.

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I've read a few articles where people were placing some blame on the game officials. As a basketball referee, here is my take on this...

Even if the officials are familiar with the participating schools and know their original colors, it's not up to them to ask a team if it's cleared to wear a certain uniform. We've all seen Oregon's wardrobe. The school colors are green and yellow. But those are hardly ever worn.

The same trend has trickled down to high schools. And because of the proliferation of "pink-outs", "black-outs", "gray-outs", "soldier dress-up days", etc, it's tough to predict what teams will wear, and what is approved.

The rules we use here in Massachusetts only state that one team must wear white, the other a darker, contrasting color. That's what happened in this game, only the home team's decorations were pink instead of it's true school color.

Up until the game starts, uniforms are part of game administration. It's not up to the referees to ask every team if their choice of uniforms was approved by their opponent. That responsibility lies with the coaches, athletic directors, and tournament directors.

If, at that point, the uniforms are ruled to be illegal, then the game officials would ask the offending team to replace its uniforms with legal ones, or accept a penalty at the start of the game (usually technical fouls).

In this state, we generally do our cancer awareness thing during the last week of January or first week of February, before the state tournaments start. Because, you know, I have no idea cancer even exists until I wear a white or pink whistle around my neck.

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I've read a few articles where people were placing some blame on the game officials. As a basketball referee, here is my take on this...

Even if the officials are familiar with the participating schools and know their original colors, it's not up to them to ask a team if it's cleared to wear a certain uniform. We've all seen Oregon's wardrobe. The school colors are green and yellow. But those are hardly ever worn.

The same trend has trickled down to high schools. And because of the proliferation of "pink-outs", "black-outs", "gray-outs", "soldier dress-up days", etc, it's tough to predict what teams will wear, and what is approved.

The rules we use here in Massachusetts only state that one team must wear white, the other a darker, contrasting color. That's what happened in this game, only the home team's decorations were pink instead of it's true school color.

Up until the game starts, uniforms are part of game administration. It's not up to the referees to ask every team if their choice of uniforms was approved by their opponent. That responsibility lies with the coaches, athletic directors, and tournament directors.

If, at that point, the uniforms are ruled to be illegal, then the game officials would ask the offending team to replace its uniforms with legal ones, or accept a penalty at the start of the game (usually technical fouls).

In this state, we generally do our cancer awareness thing during the last week of January or first week of February, before the state tournaments start. Because, you know, I have no idea cancer even exists until I wear a white or pink whistle around my neck.

Based on my understanding (specifically the part where it says the team's win was restored) it seems like the game was allowed to finish, and the decision came from someone higher up than the on-court officials. People blaming the refs are dumb rash.

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I can see a heavy fine, or something, but unless it was something that could somehow prevent them or their opponent from playing good, then that just seems a but much to make them forfeit,

Hard to fine a public high school. Its not like the school is a money making entity.

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About time, IMO. Why have rules if you aren't going to enforce them? It would have been really unfortunate for the kids, but they need to learn that not following the rules has consequences. See Chicago Little League for another incident where the adults broke the rules (though that was for competitive advantage).

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Forfeiting the game is a little heavy handed, but I agree with the idea. And why the :censored: is a girls basketball team from a public high school wearing alternate jerseys? What the hell has happened here? A decade and a half ago when I played high school football, we didn't even have enough helmets every player and the freshmen had to share! The sophomore jerseys were hand-me-down varsity jerseys and our pants were purchased sometime in the '80s. Now my high school has new Nike jerseys and pants in three colors and I believe two different helmets. What the :censored:? No high school teams should ever wear alternate uniforms.

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This isn't the 1st time a Socal/CIF school has been punished (Garfield HS football I believe) for not wearing school colors nor has it been the 1st time this coach got burned for not following the rulebook (played a suspended player last year resulting in a forfeit).

As much as I think this rule is excessive very heavy handed the coach and AD need to pick up a damn rulebook before the season starts and review all of the technical rules to ensure that all of their teams are in compliance. If you don't like the rule you need to petition to change it through the proper channels.

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About time, IMO. Why have rules if you aren't going to enforce them? It would have been really unfortunate for the kids, but they need to learn that not following the rules has consequences. See Chicago Little League for another incident where the adults broke the rules (though that was for competitive advantage).

Fixed that for you.

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Couple things..

1. if it's "illegal", then it should be the opposing coach (or whoever disapproves) who should have to report the issue before or during the game, which would afford the offenders the opportunity to be penalized and have an option to change into "conforming" uniforms - and then only have to forfeit if they are unable to do so in a reasonable amount of time. for the opposing coach to wait until after they lost the game to report it is pretty low IMO... it's like ordering food that isn't prepared the way you want it, eating every bite of it, then refusing to pay because it wasn't what you wanted. i have no problem with the team being held accountable for knowing the rules, but to retroactively call them out is kinda shady.. if the other team is doing something illegal, you have to point it out up front, before or during the game (a little leeway here, because you could argue that they didnt "notice" until just now, but its a violation and they must correct it, etc), but waiting until after the game is asinine.

2. i certainly don't have a copy of the california high school athletics rule book in front of me, so i'm not citing any specifics, but i feel as though the wording of the rule may be a bit cloudy anyway. if the rule says a school's uniforms must be in the "school's official colors" and their colors are officially "green and gold", then they could be punished for the uniforms being white.. or what if the uniforms had only green numbers and lettering on them, with no gold? would that be legal?.. i know i'm nitpicking a bit, but if the rule must be followed the the letter, then you could argue that the rules could technically be misleading or even contradictory, depending on how the language is written. like i said, i haven't read the rule or looked through their particular rulebook, but it could be bordering on ridiculous if the rules committee hasn't double-checked on themselves before they start worrying about the schools..

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About time, IMO. Why have rules if you aren't going to enforce them?

Because it's just high school sports, wgaf

It would have been really unfortunate for the kids, but they need to learn that not following the rules has consequences.

oh for the love of
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About time, IMO. Why have rules if you aren't going to enforce them?

Because it's just high school sports, wgaf

I don't and if nobody else does, then don't have the rule. But don't have a rule that says you forfeit a game if you do X, and then not enforce it. If a particular type of behavior is bad enough that you need a rule to prevent it, enforce the rule.

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