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Ironing patches onto jerseys

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So I bought an FA Cup patch off eBay that I want to put on my Arsenal jersey from last season. This is a patch that is normally heat-pressed on, but (predictably) I don't own a heat press.

I know some folks have had success with applying these types of patches onto jerseys using a regular household iron. Anyone able to share their experiences in that regard? Understandably, this is something I don't want to screw up.

Alternatively, I've been asking around town here a bit to see if there's a T-shirt shop that might do the heat press for me. Has anyone here done that?

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I was asking for personal experiences with patches, not simply a how-to. Things I should watch out for that might not be included on instructions, that sort of thing. I assure you I know how to use Google.

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Ok, heat pressing and ironing is literally the same exact thing just with different machines. If you want to spend money for a shirt shop to do it go ahead, if you want to iron it on by yourself do it, it's not that hard to do, just make sure everything is placed correctly and the material is flat (not stretched though that will cause other problems) and like I said before make sure it's on low heat because of the jersey being polyester you don't want it to melt. I've never done it on a jersey but have had fairly good success with my uniforms for the military

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I have a few jerseys that I've worn when umpiring baseball games that have patches (about 3" square) heat-pressed onto them. The jerseys are a soft moisture-wicking polyester blend, so even though there's a slight mesh pattern to it, it's similar to other soccer jerseys I've seen.

The patches have held on for at least three years during regular game use, and washing/drying.

If you're worried about the patch falling off, or otherwise ruining the jersey due to the patch adhesive, you should be ok.

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I added the Rapids MLS Cup Scudetto patch to one of my shirts with an iron and tbh, my experience was that you would really have to mess up to burn the jersey. I think the important thing is just put it on a relatively low setting and place it 10 seconds at a time and keep checking to make sure you don't burn the jersey. I was freaked out after the first 10 seconds to see what it looked like but I think it ended up taking me about 45 seconds of ironing total. Moral of the story, I'm sure you will be fine, just go for it, but... be careful and don't leave the iron on the jersey for too long and make sure you are lightly moving it around and not just planting it over the patch.

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I've only ever added patches to baseball jerseys, so they're a little heavier. Never had any problems though.

First I would spray the back of the patch with a light adhesive spray to hold it in place while ironing. Then (and this obviously varies depending on your iron) I would very gently iron it on using the lowest setting, sometimes using more heat for thicker jerseys. Lastly I would sew around the edges because I like the look of a patch sewn onto a baseball jersey (and it keeps it on better), but that's just me. Quick and easy process that I never had any problems with.

Hopefully my generic advice encourages you!

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Put wax paper over it to help avoid scorching.

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If you're near a mall with a Lids Locker Room in it, take it there and use their FanZones machine. It's specially designed for adhearing patches and numbers to jerseys/hats and the whole thing should take about ten seconds.

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Awesome, thanks all! I don't think there are any Lids Locker Room locations in Canada, but according to the Fanzones website, they have a machine at the Sport Chek at West Edmonton Mall. I might see if they'll do it, but if not, I feel more comfortable doing it on my own.

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Put wax paper over it to help avoid scorching.

This....and make sure to douse it with lighter fluid before you set it on fire. Because, why else would someone want an Arsenal jersey? :P

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Put wax paper over it to help avoid scorching.

This....and make sure to douse it with lighter fluid before you set it on fire. Because, why else would someone want an Arsenal jersey? :P

What's that? I can't hear you all the way up here in second place.

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Put wax paper over it to help avoid scorching.

This....and make sure to douse it with lighter fluid before you set it on fire. Because, why else would someone want an Arsenal jersey? :P

What's that? I can't hear you all the way up here in second place.

*Bookmarked for the inevitable drop to 4th

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Put wax paper over it to help avoid scorching.

This....and make sure to douse it with lighter fluid before you set it on fire. Because, why else would someone want an Arsenal jersey? :P

What's that? I can't hear you all the way up here in second place.

23683-Ashton-Kutcher-burn-gif-95QB.gif

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Or you remove the plastic baking and then sew (or find someone to sew) the patch on the jersey.

This. I always take my patches to a local mom & pop sewing shop and let them put it on. It's never more than like $3. I can't be bothered to try to iron a patch on.

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Put wax paper over it to help avoid scorching.

This....and make sure to douse it with lighter fluid before you set it on fire. Because, why else would someone want an Arsenal jersey? :P

What's that? I can't hear you all the way up here in second place.

*Bookmarked for the inevitable drop to 4th

No matter where we end up, I'll be sure to send you a nice St. Totteringham's Day card. ^_^

Or you follow spyboy's method and remove the plastic baking and then sew (or find someone to sew) the patch on the jersey.

http://boards.sportslogos.net/topic/64745-how-to-remove-plastic-backing-from-patches/

EDIT: forgot the link

Well, this patch is a little different from those ones. It's not embroidered; I believe it's made of Lextra, that flocked-looking material that the Premier League also uses for their numbers. It's not made to be sewn on, nor would it look good. I have a Calgary Flames jersey with an embroidered 2004 Stanley Cup Finals patch that I had sewn on at a quilting shop when I was living in Fernie, B.C.; in that case, the sewing looks good and has held up. But this FA Cup patch is altogether a different animal.

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Put wax paper over it to help avoid scorching.

This....and make sure to douse it with lighter fluid before you set it on fire. Because, why else would someone want an Arsenal jersey? :P

What's that? I can't hear you all the way up here in second place.

*Bookmarked for the inevitable drop to 4th

No matter where we end up, I'll be sure to send you a nice St. Totteringham's Day card. ^_^

Or you follow spyboy's method and remove the plastic baking and then sew (or find someone to sew) the patch on the jersey.

http://boards.sportslogos.net/topic/64745-how-to-remove-plastic-backing-from-patches/

EDIT: forgot the link

Well, this patch is a little different from those ones. It's not embroidered; I believe it's made of Lextra, that flocked-looking material that the Premier League also uses for their numbers. It's not made to be sewn on, nor would it look good. I have a Calgary Flames jersey with an embroidered 2004 Stanley Cup Finals patch that I had sewn on at a quilting shop when I was living in Fernie, B.C.; in that case, the sewing looks good and has held up. But this FA Cup patch is altogether a different animal.

I have a Liverpool jersey and the patches aren't sewn on, so if you are looking for authenticity I would go against seeing them on

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I happened to find myself near a soccer store today, so I went in and asked about the possibility of them heat-pressing the patch on. They said they would only do customization work on products they sold because, if they screw it up, then they're responsible for replacing the item. Makes perfect sense to me, but I'm guessing that's going to be the case at any other retail place I ask. Looking more and more like this is going to be a DIY project with the ol' iron.

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I've generally made my own patches (and scripts and numbers) and ironed em on tees, a few blank jerseys I bought a while back, and my various el cheapo attempts at making jerseys from scratch (the fabric I used is literally the cheapest you can get, and I'm self-taught, so the fit was weird...if the realization that all those youth/rec league jerseys have to be ordered from somewhere had hit me years earlier, I could've saved myself at least one bit of trouble :D ). I wouldn't recommend any printable fabrics, as in my experience the color tends to fade horribly.

I've mainly worked with twill and canvas, though. Figured before I said anything further, I learn a bit about what Lextra and flocking were, and came across this link. Hope that helps.

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