nas1787

Professional rugby union coming to US in 2016, Canada 2017

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I love all styles of play, but only Rugby 7's has a real chance of garnering wide support in America.

The only problem with sevens (the only rugby code that I've really enjoyed watching) is the play format. Games are far too short to hold as single events. Would they hold tournaments in each of the team cities? I'm not sure that translates well to an American sports audience.

It would end up having more in common with individual sports like golf or tennis. Not unprecedented, but certainly there would be challenges with attracting fans to a specific team.

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Who is fronting the $$$? World Rugby (through their marketing arm)? That press release was only a business plan.

They want to start in April, thus they've got lots of work to do very quickly.

The Fox Sports article outlines the financial issues. Essentially one rich guy with ties to PRO Rugby is fronting ALL the cash necessary for season 1. Obviously that's not sustainable as there will likely be heavy losses for years to come, so it will be interesting to see how they tackle this in the years ahead.

Link

So that means that all players will be owned by the league and the league will be playing their salaries. As someone pointed out, if the average salary for a player is $25k then a season's payroll will be $4.5 million. That's a lot of money. Add in travel, facility rental, etc., then it's not a cheap proposition. However, it's not as if the people involved aren't aware of this. From what we understand the league is more than prepared to see this out for several years.

Apparently, they are looking to draw 3,000/game.

If this league works, I'd like to see a TV contract happening as well. It would be great to have pro rugby in North America so players actually have a place to play rather then going over seas. It will be better for both the Canadian and American programs in the long run.

About TV...

RWU: Okay, let’s get you off the hot-seat and change gears. The Professional Rugby Organization (PRO) has us Rugby-heads all giggly, with it’s announcement that it will launch professional rugby in the United States as early as April. Unlike some other entities, it is officially sanctioned by USA Rugby. Businessman Doug Schoninger and long-time rugby man Stephen Lewis are the faces attached, but is this also a RIM (Rugby International Marketing venture? If not, will it be involved down the road?

NM: Yes, we are providing support for Doug’s league, support in terms of advice and expertise. He will require referees, players, coaches, team managers and also local event staff. We can connect him with these communities and also support alignment with our amateur clubs competitions and National Championships. If RIM can help in terms of sponsors, broadcast then it will.

RWU: Will the matches air on the USA Rugby digital channel and if so, will there be a charge?

NM: Yes, we would like to make sure all games are accessible to our rugby community and start to follow the teams as they develop.

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I love all styles of play, but only Rugby 7's has a real chance of garnering wide support in America.

The only problem with sevens (the only rugby code that I've really enjoyed watching) is the play format. Games are far too short to hold as single events. Would they hold tournaments in each of the team cities? I'm not sure that translates well to an American sports audience.

It would end up having more in common with individual sports like golf or tennis. Not unprecedented, but certainly there would be challenges with attracting fans to a specific team.

I've actually given the concept of professional Rugby 7's some thought, and I know how the play format hurdle could be overcome:

  1. Instead of a "home game," each club would host a "home series," comprised not of one but five games. Each series would be worth seven standings points: one for each of the five games, with a two-point bonus for winning the series (three or more out of five).
  2. Each club would play a home-and-home series with every other club in its league, Premier League-style.
  3. Clubs would be of sufficient size to restrict players to play a maximum of three games of the five game series, and no consecutive games.

With these and perhaps some other minor changes, I think it could be viable as a small-scale (i.e., perhaps equivalent in attendance to hockey or basketball per-event) sport.

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I could see soccer-specific stadia in New Jersey, Philadelphia, Salt Lake, and Colorado being used.

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I could see soccer-specific stadia in New Jersey, Philadelphia, Salt Lake, and Colorado being used.

If they're only looking to average 3,000/game, they will look at Glendale, CO, a Denver suburb, and Infinity Park since it is rugby specific.

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I love all styles of play, but only Rugby 7's has a real chance of garnering wide support in America.

The only problem with sevens (the only rugby code that I've really enjoyed watching) is the play format. Games are far too short to hold as single events. Would they hold tournaments in each of the team cities? I'm not sure that translates well to an American sports audience.

It would end up having more in common with individual sports like golf or tennis. Not unprecedented, but certainly there would be challenges with attracting fans to a specific team.

I've actually given the concept of professional Rugby 7's some thought, and I know how the play format hurdle could be overcome:

  1. Instead of a "home game," each club would host a "home series," comprised not of one but five games. Each series would be worth seven standings points: one for each of the five games, with a two-point bonus for winning the series (three or more out of five).
  2. Each club would play a home-and-home series with every other club in its league, Premier League-style.
  3. Clubs would be of sufficient size to restrict players to play a maximum of three games of the five game series, and no consecutive games.

With these and perhaps some other minor changes, I think it could be viable as a small-scale (i.e., perhaps equivalent in attendance to hockey or basketball per-event) sport.

Makes sense to me....kinda like how volleyball's played, except this one wouldn't be a best-of format. It's funny, I'm not a huge fan of the 15 man game, but I like watching sevens when I come across it.

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As a fan of rugby league I'm hoping that someday league will be played professionally in North America. League is a much more offense oriented and open than union. League is faster paced and trys (touchdowns) are the order of the day. In union, penalty goals seem to be the preferred mode of scoring. Rugby league also doesn't have lineouts which take forever to bring the ball back into play. League and union both have scrums, but league's scrums are uncontested and are used more to open the field up. The less said about union scrums the better - more often than not they take three cracks at getting it right, and usually don't, before one team or the other gets a penalty before they move on. As well, rugby league has a play-the-ball, which, when the ball carrier is tackled he is permitted to get back up and roll the ball back with his foot to a teammate and play moves right on. Very similar to the center snap in football. Union's answer to this is the ruck, where a bunch of guys roll around on the ground and ram into each other until things get going again. All of this makes the pace of league much faster than union, and much, much faster than American or Canadian football. I kept track of the number of plays in both codes at each codes biggest event. In Australia's National Rugby League Grand Final (league) there were 418 plays. In the Rugby World Cup Final (union) there were 262 plays. I am also going to track the Super Bowl and Grey Cup for number of plays - they won't come close to league, or union for that matter.

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As a fan of rugby league I'm hoping that someday league will be played professionally in North America. League is a much more offense oriented and open than union. League is faster paced and trys (touchdowns) are the order of the day. In union, penalty goals seem to be the preferred mode of scoring. Rugby league also doesn't have lineouts which take forever to bring the ball back into play. League and union both have scrums, but league's scrums are uncontested and are used more to open the field up. The less said about union scrums the better - more often than not they take three cracks at getting it right, and usually don't, before one team or the other gets a penalty before they move on. As well, rugby league has a play-the-ball, which, when the ball carrier is tackled he is permitted to get back up and roll the ball back with his foot to a teammate and play moves right on. Very similar to the center snap in football. Union's answer to this is the ruck, where a bunch of guys roll around on the ground and ram into each other until things get going again. All of this makes the pace of league much faster than union, and much, much faster than American or Canadian football. I kept track of the number of plays in both codes at each codes biggest event. In Australia's National Rugby League Grand Final (league) there were 418 plays. In the Rugby World Cup Final (union) there were 262 plays. I am also going to track the Super Bowl and Grey Cup for number of plays - they won't come close to league, or union for that matter.

Hey, I dont come on league threads praising the superiority of Union, so kindly leave that for league threads.

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Sorry, just stating some facts and my opinion. I would bet that if you put 100 average North American sports fans in a room and have them watch the Rugby Union and Rugby League World Cup finals, the majority would leave the room preferring Rugby League.

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Yeah, but until somebody ponies up the money for a League league, that's not terribly relevant. They want Union, so Union it is.

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I'm hoping this works. Its time for something else to take off in this country.

I know, right? So tired of not having enough entertainment options competing for our attention and dollars. :P

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Suggestions.

Needs to be known as the CRU - Continental Rugby Union

Have clubs in Union areas

Have identities that are similar to other Countries, like the MLS has done. But not Saracens due to it's linking heritage.

Associate the clubs with Universities and colleges to get a tight foot hole in the clubs areas. Even link up with the NFL side in the area and use their colours.

Should work if it is goverened properly

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An interview (which seems heavily edited) with PROrugby CEO Doug Schoninger from Rugby Wrap Up which was posted on Tuesday.

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With more and more of this NFL bafoon-ery I'm ready to see some rugby organization/league get established in this country. The more rugby I watch the more I like it. Those guys can outplay 98% of the NFL players.

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With more and more of this NFL bafoon-ery I'm ready to see some rugby organization/league get established in this country. The more rugby I watch the more I like it. Those guys can outplay 98% of the NFL players.

What exactly does this mean?

Do you mean outplay them in a game of rugby? American football?

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Athleticism.

Jarryd Hayne.

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