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Throwball Club Cup: 2016 Japan


jmoe12

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Hello, CCSLC! Some of you may remember my original Throwball concepts, the North American Throwball Association. It wasn't the greatest of concepts, and it was poorly organized and executed. But this time I'm hoping to do better. 

 

First, some background on the sport. Throwball is an exciting and fast-paced game featuring elements from soccer, rugby, hockey, and basketball. Since the sport's creation in 1966 by Jason Moelduer, it has grown rapidly in popularity in both the United States and the world. Professional leagues have been established and are flourishing on every continent except Antarctica. For more in-depth covering of the rules, see below

 

Laws of the Game

Spoiler

 

Basics

Dimensions and Team Size

Throwball is played on a hockey rink-sized pitch. The ball used is a volleyball. Goals sit at either end of the pitch and stand 4.5 feet tall by 3 feet wide. Teams are allowed 15 total active players, 20 on the roster, though only 6 are allowed on the pitch at any time; 5 field players and one goalie. Matches are played in 3 20 minute periods. If the game is tied after 60 minutes, two 10 minute sudden death overtime periods are played, and if still tied, a shootout is used to break the tie. Each team is awarded two minute long timeouts per match, and one extra for overtime.

atwuAYl.png?1

 

Points System

 

Throwball uses a unique scoring format, known as the Moelduer System. Three points are available in each match, and the points are divided based on the result of the game. Three points would be awarded to a team for a regulation victory, two for an overtime victory, one for an overtime loss, and none for a regulation loss. Records are kept in a W-OTW-OTL-L format, going down from the greatest number of points to the least.

 

Positions and Players

 

Center: The center is like a basketball point guard. He is usually one of the shorter players on his team, but he must be strong enough to gain entrance into the offensive zone as well as penetrate towards the goal. The center's main role, however, is to distribute to his teammates, and usually leads the team in assists.

 

Front Wing: The front wing usually  plays in front of the net and is called on for pull-up shooting and penetration to the goal. Front Wings usually lead the team in goals scored and shots taken. Tall and lanky, front wings must be quick to play lock-down D on the perimeter.

 

 

Back Wing: Big and strong, but also quick and agile, back wing is the most physically demanding positions on the pitch. Usually playing behind the net, back wings must be able to power through the defense to the front of the net, as well as whip laser passes back to the front to his teammates.

 

 

High Post: Usually standing about 6'6", high posts make their living grabbing passes from high in the air, then turning and powering the ball into the net. On defense, high posts use their long frame to get into shooting lanes and block any shot that comes his way.

 

 

Wide Post: Usually the strongest, and also the heaviest, player on the pitch, high posts set up shop in front of the opponents' net and post up their defender. Once they receive the ball, they use basketball like post moves to muscle their way to a close-range shot.

 

 

Goalie: Very similar to hockey goalies, throwball goalies must make saves, as well as be a good distributor to his teammates to start the attack. Goalies are allowed to use their feet inside the trapezoid, and frequently use punts to clear their lines and begin an attack.

 

 

Game play

 

Throwball is a full-contact sport with hard hockey checks and some rugby elements. The offense may advance the ball by running or passing in any direction. Once possession is gained, the offense has 10 seconds to advance the ball into their offensive zone, and 30 seconds to take a shot. A "shot" is considered any ball that is clearly directed at goal. If either of these time limits is exceeded, possession is forfeited to the opponent. Offsides is called the same as in hockey; the ball must be the first thing to cross the line into the offensive zone. The defense may use any number of methods to regain possession for their side. They may intercept an opponent's pass, recover a loose ball, or use two methods unique to throwball, wraps and stands. Wraps are usually used when a defender is behind the ball carrier, and consists of the defender wrapping one arm around the player, and using the other arm to knock out the ball. The defender may hold this position for three seconds, and may only wrap one arm around the player at any time. Stands are much more difficult than wraps, but are far more effective when executed properly. Stands take place when a defender stops a ball carrier's forward progress from the front by holding onto his torso with both arms and preventing him from advancing. If the refs decide the offensive player no longer can move forward, or two seconds pass, a stand is called and possession is awarded to the defense. Throwball uses changes on the fly like hockey, but there are some minor differences. Change zones (see below) are used for changes. The player coming on must wait in the bench area until both feet of the player coming off have touched down in the change zone, and the new player must wait in the change zone until the player coming off is completely in the bench. Failure to follow this procedure results in a too-many men penalty and a two minute power play for the opponent. Each team is allowed 24 changes per game, but once a player is taken off, he may return. In case of overtime, the teams are allowed 8 additional changes, plus any remaining from regulation.

 

 

 

Starting/Restarting the Game

 

 

 

Each game and period is begun with a tip-off at the middle circle (similar to a basketball jump ball). A player on each team, usually the high post, attempts to tip the ball back to their teammate after the ball is bounced off the center dot. Two other ways to restart play are face-offs and put ins. Face-offs take place after a held ball by the goalie any held-ball situation, or a grounding (An offensive player placing the ball on the ground and maintaining possession, similar to a rugby try.. A cross between a hockey face-off and two man rugby scrum, once the ball is dropped off the dot and bounces back up, the two players, usually a wide post or back wing, battle to swat the ball through their legs and to a teammate.  Players may use their shoulders, and only their shoulders, to push their opponent back and gain position. A put in occurs after a rules infraction (more on that later) or a timeout and is the throwball equivalent to a free kick. Put-ins can be either direct or indirect, though these terms do not mean the same thing as in soccer. A goal may be scored on either kind of put in. Indirect put ins are awarded after a minor infraction or after a team calls timeout. On an indirect put in, a defender is allowed to guard the put in taker closely, staying an arm's length away. Offsides is called on an indirect put in.

Direct put ins are much easier to score from because the defense is required to stand five yards away from the ball. Additionally, no offsides is called on direct put ins, meaning players may stand in front of the goal to rebound the shot or catch passes. Direct put ins are given after more serious infractions.

 

The Field

 

Throwball fields are very similar to hockey rinks, but there are several key differences.

atwuAYl.png?1

Similarities

 

  • Faceoff dots and zone lines are in the same position

  • Crease in front of the goal reserved for the goalie

  • Goal moved forward from the back edge of the field

 

 

Differences

 

  • Benches on either side of the field instead of both on the same side

  • Change zones (the trapezoids in front of the benches) used for on-the-fly changes

  • Trapezoid or "trap" around the goal. Only one offensive player can be in the trap at any time, and each player is only allowed in the trap  for 5 seconds at a time

  • Penalty spot (the hollow dot) is used for shootouts or in-game penalty shots.

 

Breaking the Rules

 

There are two kinds of rule violations in throwball, Infractions and Penalties. Infractions result in put ins, direct or indirect. A list of common infractions is shown below. (* equals direct put in, ** equals an infraction that can be declared a penalty under some circumstances)

  • Offsides

  • Face-off Encroachment (A player goes for a face-off too early or uses illegal methods to win the face-off)

  • Trapezoid Violation (Two players in the trap or one player in the trap for more than 5 seconds)

  • Crease violation (Player steps into the crease when the ball is not in the crease)**

  • Kicking** (Can be penalty if viewed as intentional)

  • Out of Bounds Play* (Hitting the ball out of play unintentionally)

  • Holding* (Holding a wrap for more than three seconds or wrapping with both hands. Can be a penalty shot if the player had a clear path to the goal)

  • Driving** (Knocking the player down while attempting a stand)

  • 10 second violation* (Offense fails to advance the ball into the offensive zone within 10 seconds of gaining possession.)

  • Shot Clock Violation* (Offense fails to attempt shot in 30 seconds)

 

Penalties are for the more severe violations. When a penalty is committed, the offending team is forced to play down one player for either 2,4, or 5 minutes, depending on the severity of the foul. The offending player must go to the penalty box and serve his time there. If a goal is scored on a 2 minute, or minor penalty, penalty time  is erased and the team is returned to full strength. This is not the case on double minor or major penalties. If the refs decide a penalty was committed to directly stop a clear scoring chance for the opponents, a penalty shot is awarded, though this is rare. To begin a normal power play, the team with the man-advantage is given a direct put-in from the start of the penalty. Here is a list of some common penalties in throwball. Note that unlike in hockey, any of these penalties can be changed to major if the refs decide that the foul deserves it.

 

  • Roughing (Hitting a player away from the ball)

  • Boarding (Slamming a defenseless player into the boards)

  • Clipping (Hitting a player below the waist)

  • Targeting (Hitting a player above the chest)

  • Delay of game (Intentionally directing the ball out of play and into the stands)

  • Diving (Embellishing a hit in an attempt to draw a foul)

  • Goaltender Interference (Hitting a goalie or preventing him from playing the ball while the goalie is in the crease)

  • Too Many Men (Failing to follow changing procedure)

  • Tripping (Tripping a player)

  • Unsportsmanlike Conduct (Used to define any penalty not listed)

For some more in-depth tactical explanation, read here

 

 

 

Basic Tactics

 

Spoiler
Spoiler

 

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The basic field set has Red Team on offense, bringing only four, and leaving one, in this situation the High Post (though the player left back varies from team to team, and some do bring all 5), back as a security for a Blue Team breakaway. Also note the Red Team keeper cheating up from the goal in order to be used as a potential pass-back option if the offense stalls. Blue Team is using a man to man defensive scheme (though 1-3-1, 2-1-2, and 3-2 zones are also used) with the high post left to guard the middle and to prevent any penetration.

xfBPuWO.png

Blue Team utilizes a classic 4-1 neutral zone press in this scenario (1-3-1, 3-2, and 1-4 are also common). The two Blue Team posts stay put in the middle of the pitch to prevent any easy entry through the center, while the Back Wing and Center guard the flanks. The speedy front wing sits behind the line and tries to prevent any passes over the top. Red Team tries to enter through the middle, but with three defenders there, entering outside is more probable. Outside entry usually means the center firing a quick pass to either of the wings, who will try to power through a one-on-one battle. With a faster player, the Center could also try to throw a pass over the top, with the winger having to be careful to stay onsides. If Red Team would try to enter through the middle, it would usually be a quick lob over the top to the High Post, or the Center penetrating to draw the defenders over, and a short back pass to the Wide Post, who would use his strength to power into the offensive zone.

 

atwuAYl.png

 

Tip offs are used to start the game and each of the periods. In most cases, the two High Posts are the ones taking the tip, but in rare cases, a Wide Post or Back Wing may do it instead. Red Team is using a more conservative approach, with a balanced formation and plenty of defensive help from the wide post, who is almost in his own trapezoid. Blue Team is in a more aggressive formation, with the left side overloaded to try to start a quick break once they control the tip.

jfaaxQP.png

Used after a held ball situation or grounding, controlling faceoffs is a pivotal part of winning games. Note that on a faceoff, players are required to stay behind the ball. Blue Team, on offense, will try to hit the ball back to their Center, who can choose to carry the ball towards the goal, throw a quick pass to the Front Wing for a shot, or make a riskier throw to the Back Wing. Blue Team uses a more conservative approach to this face off, as the High Post is sitting back in cover instead of in an attacking position. Red Team will want to win the faceoff and hope to catch Blue Team off guard with a quick break, with a long pass to the Front Wing starting a 1-1 breakaway. If the faceoff is lost, it is up to the Front Wing to sprint to his opposite number to prevent a wide open look on goal.

pCoc8Mb.png

A Blue Team infraction just outside the Offensive Zone gives Red Team a valuable Put In in a dangerous position. Once play resumes, the Red Team Center has 5 seconds to get rid of the ball while staying stationary. Because the put in is indirect, offsides is called, so the Red Team players must stay in the Neutral Zone until the ball is thrown. Going over the top to either the High Post, Back Wing, or Front Wing is the primary option, but if all else fails, a short toss to the Wide Post or a throw back to the Goalie would prevent a five-second violation. Blue Team uses their Center to put pressure on the ball, staying an arm’s length away, and the two Wings are hoping to prevent the bunch of Red Team players from receiving a long pass. The two Blue Team Posts sit back to cut off a shot.

Es00TXk.png

Though the fouls occurred roughly in the same spot, Blue Team’s put in is much more dangerous than the Red Team’s above because of the added space and no offsides of a direct put in. Blue Team also has their Center taking the put in, as is typical (Though Front Wings are also good at long range shots). All four of the other Blue Team players are in the offensive zone to give a passing option or to rebound a potential shot. The Goalie is well off his line to provide a relief option if nothing is open. Red Team has their Wide Post and Center in a wall 5 yards from the ball,  and the other players matched up in man-to-man.

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After a more severe foul is committed by Blue Team’s Front Wing, Red Team is awarded a 2 minute Power Play. To begin the man advantage, Red Team is awarded a direct put in. Red Team’s Center will try to either sneak a shot through the crowd in front of goal, lob a crossing pass to his Front Wing, or sling a heater to his Back Wing to set up an attack. Blue Team is doing their best to match up with only four players, with their Center sitting in a one man wall (that probably is closer than five yards), the Posts and Back Wing matched up with their opposite numbers, and the Front Wing having to be left alone on the top.

 

 

 

Now, on to the Club Cup.

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The Club Cup is a Biennial competition featuring the top Club teams from around the world. Since its inception in 1994, the Cup has grown to a 32 team challenge that received world TV ratings even better than the NBA Finals in 2014.  In 11 competitions, 9 teams have taken the crown, with Loups de Montreal and Hannover Archers bother having won twice. The Club Cup runs throughout the month of February, following a World Cup format. For results in all of the Cups, click these links and go to town!

Champions

1994: Qualifying Cup

1996: Qualifying Cup

1998: Qualifying Cup

2000: Qualifying Cup

2002: Qualifying Cup

2004: Qualifying Cup

2006: Qualifying Cup

2008: Qualifying Cup

2010: Qualifying Cup

2012: Qualifying Cup

2014: Qualifying Cup

2016: Qualifying  Cup

 

More Information on the Teams and Players

 

Club Cup Rosters 2016


Player Ratings

 

League Information

 

Club Teams

 

League Established Dates

 

Historical Champions

 

If you find any bad links or mistakes anywhere, PM me so that I can address it. Thanks!

 

As you can tell from the title, this year's competition is being held in Japan. 12 Teams have already punched their tickets by winning some of the more competitive leagues, and 20 more will reach the Cup through Qualifying, which is running through the month of January. I will be posting two of the Qualified teams per day, one in the morning, and one at night, and will continue to update the Qualifying scores daily. As teams begin to qualify, I will be posting them as well, and then, once the Cup begins in February, I will be posting scoreboards and uniform match ups for each of the games.

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Now, the first team

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Club Cup Appearances: 7 (2016, 2014, 2012, 2010, 2008, 2004, 1996)

Best Finish: 3rd (2014, 2008)

2015 Season Result: 96 points (1st in Deutschland Throwball Association)

Consistently one of the world’s top clubs, Amsterdam has been in especially dominant form over the last few years, Winning the last three DTA finals, as well as the Deutsch Cup in 2015. A mix of home-grown talent like Christiann Meijer and Adrianus van Drummond coupled with signings like Martino Inzaghi and Zdenik Hajovsky hope to finally lift this team to the title. Post play has been a big issue for Amsterdam this season, with Erwin Dahl and Bram Rijnders finally settling into the starting positions in October. If these two can hold their own against elite opposition, Amsterdam would become the toughest out in Japan.

For the design, I went with a bold, simple, and recognizable mark, and some basic kits to go with them. Amsterdam is a club rich in tradition, and they have kept the same basic home kit throughout their existence. The clash is a deviation from the norm, with a kit not maroon, orange, or white being worn for the first time. The Blackout Kit is especially popular among the younger demographic, but the older fans want the team's regular colors restored to all the kits.

C&C this one, up, and I should have another one posted tonight!

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How come Amsterdam is in the German league?

This happens a few times in Throwball. The league was originally just German, but it quickly expanded to other neighboring countries and never re branded. Teams from Holland, Belgium, Switzerland, and Luxembourg are also in the DTA. There have been talks of a re brand, and any suggested names would be considered.

EDIT: Probably should have posted these earlier, but I'll update the first post with the league alignment, founded dates, and historical champions to give you a better idea of the structure

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Sorry for the double post, but I have another team ready

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Club Cup Appearances: 1 (2016)

Best Finish: N/A

2015 Season Result: 93 points (1st in French Throwball Federation)

After years and years of mediocrity, Bordeaux finally made a breakthrough in 2014, winning the league for the first time. Many thought that the Boars’ ownership of the FTF table would be short-lived after many bigger clubs poached some of their top talent, but Bordeaux proved the doubters wrong when a dominating 2015 season. They won the league for a second time, with rookie post Xavier Toussaint filling the void left by players like Auro Varkonn and winning league MVP honors with a stellar campaign. If the Boars can stay in form, they are a dark horse to the bring Club Cup trophy to France for the first time.

The design plays off Bordeaux being in the heart of wine country with a wine primary, with a blue and sort of pink color as accents. Bordeaux has almost always had the chevron on the front of their kits, and this year is no exception. Because navy did not clash enough with the wine, the Boars were forced to wear a white clash kit, though a pink clash is rumored for next season.

I'll try to keep posting two concepts a day, as I have about twenty done as of today. I'll be releasing one in the morning and one in the afternoon until the 12 teams that qualified automatically are done, and then I'll start getting into the other 20.

C&C greatly appreciated!

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May I just add that there's more than one city in Australia! Surely Sydney couldn't of won so many times.

Sydney is really the capital of throwball in Australia, with 'Siders and Kookaburras dominating the league, similar to the AFL and Melbourne. The two clubs have quite a rivalry, but challengers like Wollongong, Brisbane, Perth, and even Auckland will probably add more parity to the league in the coming years.

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May I just add that there's more than one city in Australia! Surely Sydney couldn't of won so many times.

Sydney is really the capital of throwball in Australia, with 'Siders and Kookaburras really dominating the league, similar to the AFL and Melbourne. The two clubs have quite a rivalry, but challengers like Wollongong, Brisbane, Perth, and even Auckland will probably add more parity to the league in the coming years.

Perth Great Whites are for me. The talent pool probably needs to be spread out wider or something to combat the dominant Sydney lol.

Looking forward to the Australian teams, being an aussie myself.

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May I just add that there's more than one city in Australia! Surely Sydney couldn't of won so many times.

Sydney is really the capital of throwball in Australia, with 'Siders and Kookaburras really dominating the league, similar to the AFL and Melbourne. The two clubs have quite a rivalry, but challengers like Wollongong, Brisbane, Perth, and even Auckland will probably add more parity to the league in the coming years.

Perth Great Whites are for me. The talent pool probably needs to be spread out wider or something to combat the dominant Sydney lol.

Looking forward to the Australian teams, being an aussie myself.

Perth is in a great position for the next few years. They finished 6th this season, and are building a strong core around Fijian sniper Duane Hossain. The Great Whites are one of the favorites to qualify in 2018.

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Go Chennai and Edmonton!

Well, you're in luck! Edmonton's suffocating defense helped them to finish tied for first in the Canadian Throwball Premiership this season, but lost the title to Toronto on goal difference. They should be qualifying soon.

BTW, Canberra Capitals are also a Basketball team in Australia so you might want to change it.

Thanks for the info, Spanna65. I guess the teams share an owner and are part of the same brand, similar to how Barcelona has a basketball team, as well as many other sports.

Maybe put a number on the front of the jersey too so it feels less empty

I've played around with numbers on the front of Bordeaux, but the way the boar's head comes so far down makes the number position awkward. I could give it another try though.

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Maybe I missed something in the rules, but I don't imagine how a volleyball sized ball would be able to be scored on 3' x 4.5' net with an adult man standing in net. That is not very big, considering it is half the width of a hockey goal.

You didn't miss anything, CanucksBrad, and you actually touched on one of my biggest concerns for the rules. The ball I used was originally smaller, but after it popped, I had to find a replacement, and a volleyball was the one thing I had. Most goals are scored on breakaways or from close range chances, and shots taken from the outside are usually 80+ miles an hour with deadly accuracy. In reality, it may not be practical, but in my fictional world, it will do for now. This may be something I change in the future, though

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Maybe I missed something in the rules, but I don't imagine how a volleyball sized ball would be able to be scored on 3' x 4.5' net with an adult man standing in net. That is not very big, considering it is half the width of a hockey goal.

You didn't miss anything, CanucksBrad, and you actually touched on one of my biggest concerns for the rules. The ball I used was originally smaller, but after it popped, I had to find a replacement, and a volleyball was the one thing I had. Most goals are scored on breakaways or from close range chances, and shots taken from the outside are usually 80+ miles an hour with deadly accuracy. In reality, it may not be practical, but in my fictional world, it will do for now. This may be something I change in the future, though

Throwing a volleyball over 80 MPH?? Holy Crap who would play goalie in the sport lol.

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