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2016 MLB Season


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1 hour ago, Shumway said:

Well, in some positive news, Dexter Fowler to Baltimore. 3 years, 35 million.

 

http://www.mlbtraderumors.com/2016/02/orioles-sign-dexter-fowler.html

That is good news. We need a lead off guy, an outfielder, and a speedster. Check, check, and check. 

 

And it also seems that the Gallardo deal may just survive the physical. I kinda overreacted, because the is just wanted more tests and they hope to get those back tomorrow. But we'll see. 

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7 minutes ago, DNAsports said:

Dexter Fowler had an agreement with the Orioles then turned around and resigned with the Cubs. He's definitely the most hated Orioles player who never actually played for the Orioles


Deal fell apart when Fowler insisted on an option.  Baltimore refused to include that in the contract; Cubs were happy to offer the option.  

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This just screams shadiness on Baltimore's part. There isn't another team in the league who agrees to deals with players then backs out of them/has them fall apart at the last minute because of overreactions to physicals/provisions they add in last minute/general shenanigans, more than the O's. They've put rules into place strictly because of how Peter Angelos handles contract situations. It's about time they cut that :censored: out. 

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2 minutes ago, Bucfan56 said:

This just screams shadiness on Baltimore's part. There isn't another team in the league who agrees to deals with players then backs out of them/has them fall apart at the last minute because of overreactions to physicals/provisions they add in last minute/general shenanigans, more than the O's. They've put rules into place strictly because of how Peter Angelos handles contract situations. It's about time they cut that :censored: out. 

 

Doesn't help Cubs are such an enticing place to play right now.  Fowler confirmed that he turned down a 3-year offer with more money from another team to play for the north side.  He does have that 1-year option though, so if it falls apart or he wants to explore the market after 2016, he can.  I think most MLB franchises should be absolutely willing to see that those opt-outs are a mutually beneficial aspect to contract negotiations, so it is baffling that Baltimore was so stingy as to have THAT be the root of contention.

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This really shouldn't surprise anyone, though. Look at the absolute nonsense they pulled with Grant Balfour a few seasons ago. There were several medical staffs around the league who disputed their findings, and Balfour's arm ended up being mostly fine. And it's not like that was a new thing for them, either. They voided a deal they had with Xavier Hernandez in 98 that forced a rule change when it comes to when teams are able to run physicals on players. Well run clubs don't do crap like that. 

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1 hour ago, CS85 said:

 

Doesn't help Cubs are such an enticing place to play right now.  Fowler confirmed that he turned down a 3-year offer with more money from another team to play for the north side.  He does have that 1-year option though, so if it falls apart or he wants to explore the market after 2016, he can.  I think most MLB franchises should be absolutely willing to see that those opt-outs are a mutually beneficial aspect to contract negotiations, so it is baffling that Baltimore was so stingy as to have THAT be the root of contention.

 

The opt-outs can help both sides, sure. Like with Heyward and the Cubs. It was reported that Heyward "took less money" to come to the Cubs, but after the collective media wiped Theo's ejaculate from its mouth, it was reported that the Cubs actually paid Heyward more in the first three years than any other team. So the Cubs got a good deal - getting a player in his prime for a decent price. Both sides know he'll opt out and hit the market again at age 29, probably signing elsewhere, and that team is going to be the one paying insane prices for a player on the decline after the first few years.

 

The players have no risk because they will opt out if they are going to get more money, which they should year-over year. The least Heyward makes is all $184 million of his Cubs contract. The teams have risk, though. The dollars after the opt-out year as seen as hypothetical, but they aren't always. If Heward is oft-injured and batting .212 in 2018, he's not opting out, leaving the Cubs to pay the rest of the hypothetical dollars for a guy who sucks. It's getting to the point where contracts are like the NFL - you see a huge number of years and total dollars, but it doesn't matter because those contract years will never come to fruition. I think teams are going with these opt-outs, committing hugely in years and dollars, thinking that the final contract won't see those last years. But some teams are going to get burned. It might not be the Cubs with Heyward and it surely won't be the Mets with Cespedes, but eventually some team is going to get royally :censored:ed because the big FA they thought they got for a decent price turns into Adam Dunn after a few years and subsequently decides not to opt out of the end of his contract.

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16 minutes ago, Bucfan56 said:

This really shouldn't surprise anyone, though. Look at the absolute nonsense they pulled with Grant Balfour a few seasons ago. There were several medical staffs around the league who disputed their findings, and Balfour's arm ended up being mostly fine. And it's not like that was a new thing for them, either. They voided a deal they had with Xavier Hernandez in 98 that forced a rule change when it comes to when teams are able to run physicals on players. Well run clubs don't do crap like that. 

 

I honestly agree with the Orioles' practices, and wished more teams were as stringent. It's never fun getting burned by a free agent or traded player's injury problems, and the Orioles have taken steps to prevent that. It may seem shady, but I support the practice.

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I'm not against any team having rigorous physical standards. Quite the contrary, actually. I agree with you that they should. But, what I'm against is a company that's notorious for making job offers to people only to pull the rug out from under them later on over details that most people wouldn't. I don't care what kind of business you're in, that's just bad form. 

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Personally, I understand why the Orioles were reluctant to give Fowler an opt-out after the first year. Sure, Fowler would've fit like a glove in our lineup, and that's why losing him is so tough. But the fact of the matter is that the Orioles have one of the worst farm systems in the MLB, bar none. So why give up a first round draft pick for a guy if he's only going to be with you for one year?  And if he doesn't opt out (which would only be if he stinks up the joint or gets injured and takes the guaranteed 10 million), the O's are stuck with an albatross of a contract. 

 

Imo the opt out clauses are a complete lose-lose for the team except in very rare cases like Heyward's in which you have a young guy who will basically op out no matter what, and them you have other teams paying him mega bucks. 

 

In in terms of the Orioles' dealings with physicals, etc., there's a fine line between due diligence and purposeful over diligence. That's a line that has definitely been crossed in the past, and it shouldn't be. 

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9 hours ago, 2001mark said:

 

It's why the Blue Jays probably will let Jose Bautista walk at age 36.  Apparently he wants north of $100m over 5 years or something.  

You know dude, I've gone back and read through this thread. Honestly, do you EVER talk about anything other than the Blue Jays? I mean come on!

 

Now if they were the Purple Jays, I could understand the obsession.

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They were going to suck anyway. Their starting pitchers' bodies are being held together by bubble gum and duct tape and most of their hitters are members of AARP.

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