Recommended Posts

Whiz wit is the only way to go. From Pat's not Geno's, of course. I have no need for my cheesesteak to be served with a side of racism.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only good thing about either Pats or Genos is the Garage Bar across the street from Genos, and the pop-up beer garden that magically appears in the summers across from Pats.  Speaking of the Garage... it's a beautiful day, might have to take the 5 block stroll to have a few spring beers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Cujo said:

Bring on the Albuquerque Green Chili Chicken Quesadillas!

Actually, they could do a pretty thorough copy of this promotion.  Somehow, I stumbled across the fact that New Mexico has an official state question: "Red or green?".  Have the fans vote on red or green chiles for their quesadilla cap logo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You know what would make the "wit" logo better?

 

Purple onions!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just heard an interview with the marketign director.  He said this (and their bacon gimmick last year) was thought of in house, but all the designs are done by Brandiose.

 

THis is also the team with the urinal video game where you move on the screen based on where your pee hits the bowl:

 

http://www.milb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20130326&content_id=43344278&fext=.jsp&vkey=news_

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On March 23, 2016 at 10:32 PM, HedleyLamarr said:

How many Philadelphia jokes are there?

 

Three. The rest are true stories.

Not a joke, but the number three reminds me of my Philly anecdote; I've been in the city three times and have seen a felony being committed each time! 

 

 

 

And logo-wise and meal-wise, I'd go 'without'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, twi said:

Not a joke, but the number three reminds me of my Philly anecdote; I've been in the city three times and have seen a felony being committed each time! 

 

This is interesting to me!  I have also been to Philly three times.  And, not only have I never seen any crimes (felonies or otherwise), but I was shocked at the polite behaviour that I witnessed on the part of that city's drivers.  

I ride a bicycle. (I rode from New York to Philadelphia and back; it is my proudest achievement.)  Here in New York it is normal to see drivers blowing stop signs and even red lights.  And, when they do deign to stop at red lights, the car at the front of the line is almost always over the stop line, and is sometimes even in the crosswalk.

I saw none of this behaviour in Philly.  Down there, drivers actually stop at stop signs; and they do this even if no pedestrians are crossing in front of them. And they come to a full stop before making a right on red. (Fortunately, there is no right-on-red in New York.  But on Long Island and in northern New Jersey, drivers routinely terrorise pedestrians by rolling right through the red on the way to a right turn.) It was remarkable to me that Philly drivers can actually be counted on to act legally at intersections.

What's more, entirely absent in the streets of that city are the constant acts of intimidation to which cyclists and pedestrians in the New York area have become accustomed.  I wear white gloves, so as to make my hand signals as visible as possible.  While riding through an intersection of two two-way streets, I will frequently put up a palm-out "stop" sign to a car going in the opposite direction that is making a left turn across my path. Every time I did this in Philadelphia, the turning car stopped -- I mean "stopped" as in "ceased moving"!  By contrast, drivers in New York typically respond to that hand signal by barely slowing down while continuing to advance on me (despite the fact that I, as the vehicle going straight, have the right of way over a turning vehicle).

My experience in Philly taught me that drivers' lawbreaking and menacing on a massive scale is not inherent to a big-city setting.  And it taught me something about my beloved home town.  When I realised that drivers in a city that is famous for booing Santa Claus are noticeably more civilised than New York's drivers, I had to conclude that there is something very wrong with the local culture of my city.
 

Around the country many people think that New Yorkers are rude A-holes. My stays in Philly made me understand that the people who hold this opinion might just have a point.

Anyway, here is my souvenir from my time down there:

 

56f45e64ea768_PhiladelphiaAs.jpg.65a462e 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Ferdinand Cesarano said:

 

This is interesting to me!  I have also been to Philly three times.  And, not only have I never seen any crimes (felonies or otherwise), but I was shocked at the polite behaviour that I witnessed on the part of that city's drivers.  

I ride a bicycle. (I rode from New York to Philadelphia and back; it is my proudest achievement.)  Here in New York it is normal to see drivers blowing stop signs and even red lights.  And, when they do deign to stop at red lights, the car at the front of the line is almost always over the stop line, and is sometimes even in the crosswalk.

I saw none of this behaviour in Philly.  Down there, drivers actually stop at stop signs; and they do this even if no pedestrians are crossing in front of them. And they come to a full stop before making a right on red. (Fortunately, there is no right-on-red in New York.  But on Long Island and in northern New Jersey, drivers routinely terrorise pedestrians by rolling right through the red on the way to a right turn.) It was remarkable to me that Philly drivers can actually be counted on to act legally at intersections.

What's more, entirely absent in the streets of that city are the constant acts of intimidation to which cyclists and pedestrians in the New York area have become accustomed.  I wear white gloves, so as to make my hand signals as visible as possible.  While riding through an intersection of two two-way streets, I will frequently put up a palm-out "stop" sign to a car going in the opposite direction that is making a left turn across my path. Every time I did this in Philadelphia, the turning car stopped -- I mean "stopped" as in "ceased moving"!  By contrast, drivers in New York typically respond to that hand signal by barely slowing down while continuing to advance on me (despite the fact that I, as the vehicle going straight, have the right of way over a turning vehicle).

My experience in Philly taught me that drivers' lawbreaking and menacing on a massive scale is not inherent to a big-city setting.  And it taught me something about my beloved home town.  When I realised that drivers in a city that is famous for booing Santa Claus are noticeably more civilised than New York's drivers, I had to conclude that there is something very wrong with the local culture of my city.
 

Around the country many people think that New Yorkers are rude A-holes. My stays in Philly made me understand that the people who hold this opinion might just have a point.

Anyway, here is my souvenir from my time down there:

 

56f45e64ea768_PhiladelphiaAs.jpg.65a462e 

 

 

Just come to Minnesota! We have people who WAVE you across even when there's no crosswalk! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd go far out of my way to never encounter anyone like you, whether they're WAVEing or not. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I've been to Philly twice, and didn't experience any of that "kindness" while I was there. One of my very best friends (my "sister") is from Philly, and she's probably the rudest person I've ever encountered. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never been to Philly aaaand I'm okay with that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, SCalderwood said:

Also, I've been to Philly, and as a city it is kind of "meh."

What makes it "meh"? Granted, being 10 minutes away from the city makes me biased but I think it's a great city. Lots of history and many things to do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎3‎/‎24‎/‎2016 at 6:37 PM, Cosmic said:

Somehow, I stumbled across the fact that New Mexico has an official state question: "Red or green?".  Have the fans vote on red or green chiles for their quesadilla cap logo.

 

The question is almost rhetorical. Nobody in New Mexico prefers red over green.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let's talk more about the promotion.  

 

there's some new merch up on the site, including adjustable caps and t shirts for team wit and team without. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Bucfan56 said:

Yeah, I've been to Philly twice, and didn't experience any of that "kindness" while I was there. One of my very best friends (my "sister") is from Philly, and she's probably the rudest person I've ever encountered. 

 

This is why I was surprised!

My run of good luck began before I even I got to the city limits, after having ridden almost 120 miles from home. While my legs still felt good, my back was hurting from carrying bags that were heavier than normal due to my having brought with me some toiletries, several changes of clothes, and (stupidly) food.  So I just wanted a place to take the bag off in order to give my back a rest before I did the last couple of miles up to my hotel in Northeast Philly. 

I saw a bench in front of a closed motorcycle dealership (Sam's Motorcycles on Bristol Pike in Bensalem -- tell him Fred from New York sent ya!), and I sat down there.  Even though the place was closed, Sam was still inside.  He saw me and came out. I apologised for inviting myself onto his property, and explained why I was there. He was completely cool with it, and said that he, too, is a bicyclist who likes to ride long distances. When I mentioned the heavy bag, and my wish that I had brought an additional bag so as to distribute the weight better and not have so much pressure on one point on my back, this guy went inside and found a bag, and actually gave it to me!

 

At various times riding around the city, I intended to leave my bike outside a store of one sort or another as I went in.  But, on several occasions, I was invited to bring my bike inside. This happened for example at a deli at 3rd and Race near the Ben Franklin Bridge, and at the hat store where I got the A's cap pictured above (Shibe Sports on 13th and Walnut). In other places, I just rolled the bike in, without any objection from anyone. I did this at several gift shops near the Liberty Bell (both small ones and the huge Independence Visitor Center), at Humphry's Flags across the street from the Betsy Ross House, at a supermarket near the hotel, and even at the Bourse.  (All of this has actually happened to me in New York, as well; it is a welcome sign of bicycling becoming normalised in urban centres around the country.)


Not only were the shopkeepers and the drivers polite, but so were the other bicyclists.  I am very adamant that bicyclists need to ride according to the rules, mostly as a strategic move. Even though the traffic laws were written with no account of bicyclists' needs, and even thought many of these laws are pretty silly when applied to bicycles, we bicyclists have an obligation to ourselves to follow these laws, just so that we do not further piss off the general public and thereby endanger the existence of our bike infrastructure, which by its nature is ephemeral and easily removed.  So I always notice when bicyclists ride the wrong way, blow red lights, and do other things that create a bad impression (and I usually tell them to cut it out).  I saw practically none of this in Philly.  I think I saw two bicyclists riding in the wrong direction during the entirety of all three of my stays there.  I see more of this in a half hour in New York than I saw in nine total days of riding in Philadelphia.

All of this ran directly counter to all my expectations, and really made a powerful impression on me.  Let's see what happens the next time I get down there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

-I met someone who was a jerk last time I was in Chicago.  Chicago sucks!  Worst city ever.

-Someone held a door for me in Boston.  Great city - nicest people ever!*

-One time I saw someone help an elderly lady cross the street in Chicago - best place ever!

-I heard that in Boston they actually kill and eat their children - horrible place, would never go there.

 

Seriously, every place is great and every place sucks.  One thing that's not debatable is that these are great jerseys, logos, and caps.  

 

 

*that one isn't true - nobody has ever held a door for anyone in Boston.  Everything else posted is true.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One takeaway from my time in Seattle is that every major American city is pretty much the same with only minor differences. They all got buildings and restaurants and traffic and people. 

 

 

#TeamWitout

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.