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Today I came across a really odd discovery. I play a lot of PC games like the very popular CS:GO but I'm also a big sports fan. I was looking into the VIJHL in Vancouver because I was curious. Then I came across a familiar word mark that I've seen in the CS:GO community. The Westshore Wolves (hockey team) share an almost identical word mark with the Copenhagen Wolves eSports organization. The Copenhagen logo has been in use since early 2012 and the Westshore logo has been in use since late 2012. 

 

This looks like pretty blatant copying to me but I'm hoping to get in contact with the designer who made the Copenhagen Wolves logo to see if he had any idea this was happening. 

 

 

wolves.png

westshore_wolves_logo_fbblack3.jpg

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The word mark is definitely damn close if not 100% the same.  I think people don't treat thisas copyright infringement when it clearly is.

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25 minutes ago, MJWalker45 said:

The word mark is definitely damn close if not 100% the same.  I think people don't treat thisas copyright infringement when it clearly is.

Yeah even the shading is the same on the text. Maybe it went overlooked because it's a junior hockey team. 

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From their facebook page, the Copenhagen Wolves ceased operations back in June, so they're likely not policing their IP.  Even if they were, considering it's Canada vs Denmark, it would be difficult to take any action.  Canada isn't going to extradite some junior team marketing intern to Denmark to be prosecuted for copyright infringement - assuming that their laws regarding such offense are even the same.

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1 minute ago, BringBackTheVet said:

From their facebook page, the Copenhagen Wolves ceased operations back in June, so they're likely not policing their IP.  Even if they were, considering it's Canada vs Denmark, it would be difficult to take any action.  Canada isn't going to extradite some junior team marketing intern to Denmark to be prosecuted for copyright infringement - assuming that their laws regarding such offense are even the same.

 

Yeah you're right. I was just curious as to what other people's thoughts were. 

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The wordmark is near identical (rounded the letters a bit, that's about it). The problem is unless they trademark just the wordmark and the junior hockey team uses just the wordmark, it's hard to say that part of one logo will confuse part of another because they're 'similar style'.

 

If they were going to make their own wolf logo, why plagiarize the wordmark under it?

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10 hours ago, Eric Westhaver said:

Didn't @GFB design that logo?

 

Yes, GFB did the Copenhagen one. I think it dates back to 2009 (according to his deviantart page).

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On 6/8/2016 at 2:42 AM, jlevesque said:

Today I came across a really odd discovery. I play a lot of PC games like the very popular CS:GO but I'm also a big sports fan. I was looking into the VIJHL in Vancouver because I was curious. Then I came across a familiar word mark that I've seen in the CS:GO community. The Westshore Wolves (hockey team) share an almost identical word mark with the Copenhagen Wolves eSports organization. The Copenhagen logo has been in use since early 2012 and the Westshore logo has been in use since late 2012. 

 

This looks like pretty blatant copying to me but I'm hoping to get in contact with the designer who made the Copenhagen Wolves logo to see if he had any idea this was happening. 

 

 

wolves.png

westshore_wolves_logo_fbblack3.jpg

The wolf no, the landmark yesss

 

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On 7/8/2016 at 10:54 PM, dont care said:

Landmark? 

The letters I mean. Sorry for my English

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