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NBA Changes 2017-18


Conrad.

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26 minutes ago, bowld said:

At least the Ad's are the same color as the uniforms. 

 

Coincidentally, GE has a green logo for green energy...I think a different shade, but using a green logo on the Celtics jersey is like a bit of a bonus.

 

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1 minute ago, ScubaSteve said:

Whoa boy. Ya'll laughed at the Sixers for being first, but theirs is the most unobtrusive so far:

 

C3B31TlWgAEwD4o.jpg

 

 

The patch looks too big. If it was smaller it'd look much better.

 

It'll be interesting to see it on the court next season, especially with the Nike logos and all. Ugh.

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I have a stupid question that probably has an obvious answer that's been discussed before -- what is the functionality of these advertisements from the perspective of a General Electric? Am I supposed to turn on an NBA game, notice that 2" x 2" patch on players' shoulders, and then be consciously or subconsciously influenced to purchase GE products the next time I need something from their industry? I'm just not sure I see where the money is in it for these sponsors, but I'm probably overlooking something obvious.

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Its the same reason why anyone sponsors anything in an arena. You get visibility and hopefully sales. By being the uniform sponsor, I'm sure GE gets a suite and some extra tickets to take their clients to the games as well. I work for a competitor of GE so hopefully my company will step up their sponsorship game and get me a chance to get some free seats

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10 minutes ago, cajunaggie08 said:

Its the same reason why anyone sponsors anything in an arena. You get visibility and hopefully sales. By being the uniform sponsor, I'm sure GE gets a suite and some extra tickets to take their clients to the games as well. I work for a competitor of GE so hopefully my company will step up their sponsorship game and get me a chance to get some free seats

 

I guess the visibility - or lack thereof - is what puzzles me. Arena signage, floor sponsorships, etc. are all unavoidable considering size and placement, while uniform patches seem quite the opposite to me at least. Maybe the fringe benefits you mentioned compensate for the lesser visibility. Although such a thing will likely never be released, I'd be very interested in seeing a cost-benefit analysis of the NBA's uniform advertisement experiment.

 

Most importantly, though, hopefully you eventually end up with free seats on your company!

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2 hours ago, Hoopladawg87 said:

I have a stupid question that probably has an obvious answer that's been discussed before -- what is the functionality of these advertisements from the perspective of a General Electric? Am I supposed to turn on an NBA game, notice that 2" x 2" patch on players' shoulders, and then be consciously or subconsciously influenced to purchase GE products the next time I need something from their industry? I'm just not sure I see where the money is in it for these sponsors, but I'm probably overlooking something obvious.

 

To those readers who have seen this lament of mine before, I ask forgiveness as I deliver it again.

Think of Magic Johnson.  You see in your mind the word "Lakers".  Think of Tom Seaver.  You see in your mind the word "Mets".  Now think of David Beckham.  What word do you see in your mind?  "Sharp".  "Herbalife".  Think of Thierry Henry.  You see "O2".

 

That is the point of these ads.  In the future, when you think back on the great moments of the coming season, you will have no choice but to envision the GE logo.  Companies pay for jersey sponsorships because what they are really buying is not space on a jersey, but space in our memories.  It is a kind of pollution.

Also, don't discount the subconscious influence.  As I look back at my purchases of a television and two phones, all from Samsung, I cannot rule out the influence from the constant exposure to that name on Chelsea's shirt for several years.  This is not to suggest that the products are bad; every Samsung product that I have bought has been great.  (And none have exploded -- I didn't buy the Note 7.)  And it's not to say that I wouldn't have bought them even if Chelsea's shirts had had a different advertiser logo or no advertiser logo. 

But, if I am honest, I have to admit that I probably tilted towards that manufacturer on account of the familiarity caused by the shirt sponsorship.  It is this familiarity effect -- and not any kind of reasoned analysis that would have a person say "GE has a patch on the Celtics' jersey; therefore its products must be of high quality" -- that companies are going for.

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And an important note here, specifically, is that GE is moving their headquarters to Boston and building a huge new building to open next year. Visibly partnering with a local team, especially in Boston, is a move to establish themselves there, too -- think about that in terms of being a local presence and building that political capital (though the tax breaks and subsidized helipad were a bad start) and recruiting for the types of white-collar workers they want (though for all of Boston's tech boom, not many born-and-raised locals in it).

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1 hour ago, VDizzle12 said:

 

They need to flip the patches. Have the green on the green jersey and white on the white. Then all you would see is the "GE" and thin outline.

 

 

Yes, that would make it less obtrusive, which would completely defeat the purpose from the advertiser's perspective. If they are shelling out big money for that space, they want the logo to be as noticeable as possible, aesthetics be damned. Sucks for those of us who care about those things, but here we are.

 

As for the size of the GE patch, I would have to assume it's the same 2 inches across as the Stubhub logo on the Sixers jersey. The moral of the story: If you're a fan of an NBA team and want your inevitable jersey ad to be as inconspicuous as possible, hope they sign a deal with a disproportionately wide (or tall) logo.

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2 hours ago, Ferdinand Cesarano said:

 

To those readers who have seen this lament of mine before, I ask forgiveness as I deliver it again.

Think of Magic Johnson.  You see in your mind the word "Lakers".  Think of Tom Seaver.  You see in your mind the word "Mets".  Now think of David Beckham.  What word do you see in your mind?  "Sharp".  "Herbalife".  Think of Thierry Henry.  You see "O2".

 

That is the point of these ads.  In the future, when you think back on the great moments of the coming season, you will have no choice but to envision the GE logo.  Companies pay for jersey sponsorships because what they are really buying is not space on a jersey, but space in our memories.  It is a kind of pollution.

Also, don't discount the subconscious influence.  As I look back at my purchases of a television and two phones, all from Samsung, I cannot rule out the influence from the constant exposure to that name on Chelsea's shirt for several years.  This is not to suggest that the products are bad; every Samsung product that I have bought has been great.  (And none have exploded -- I didn't buy the Note 7.)  And it's not to say that I wouldn't have bought them even if Chelsea's shirts had had a different advertiser logo or no advertiser logo. 

But, if I am honest, I have to admit that I probably tilted towards that manufacturer on account of the familiarity caused by the shirt sponsorship.  It is this familiarity effect -- and not any kind of reasoned analysis that would have a person say "GE has a patch on the Celtics' jersey; therefore its products must be of high quality" -- that companies are going for.

Yep, it's the same as a motorsports sponsorship. Going back to the 70s, STP wanted to increase their brand awareness, so they sponsored Richard Petty, the most successful NASCAR driver of all time. Now, any time anybody thinks of or sees Petty, they automatically think of STP. And it benefits the team in that they get paid. It's a win-win, as long as you don't care about aesthetics.

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