Sign in to follow this  
Ritt Design

How much to Charge for a Full Rebrand

Recommended Posts

Hi guys, 

 

My company is thinking about getting into doing full high school rebrands. Brand guidelines, wordmarks, primary, secondary, and tertiary logos, sport specific logos, custom fonts when necessary, the whole deal.

 

Does anyone on here do any work like this?  Does anyone have any resources they could send my way to help give me a better idea on what to charge for this type of service? I am having a hard time finding information on projects of this scale and their average costs. Any info would be very helpful.

 

Thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Moving this to General Design.

 

I wouldn't expect to get a whole lot of money out of high schools. I mean, for every one out there that builds a giant stadium or is gifted a million-dollar scoreboard, there are hundreds of high schools that are operating on shoestring budgets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

1 minute ago, officeglenn said:

Moving this to General Design.

 

I wouldn't expect to get a whole lot of money out of high schools. I mean, for every one out there that builds a giant stadium or is gifted a million-dollar scoreboard, there are hundreds of high schools that are operating on shoestring budgets.

Pretty much this. You'll have to start towards the lower end until you get some experience and brand exposure. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've rebranded 2 schools and it is not lucrative. Ive made some of my time back thru apparel, as I have maintained the rights to produce apparel and other gear. That said Ive done far more for free than for pay.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, FFWally said:

I've rebranded 2 schools and it is not lucrative. Ive made some of my time back thru apparel, as I have maintained the rights to produce apparel and other gear. That said Ive done far more for free than for pay.

 

 

This sounds about right.  From a business perspective I'd make it part of my pitch:  I'll do your rebrand for a flat rate of $(insert whatever fee they suggest here), but as long as you use it in any revenue generating way (e.g., t-shirts, hats, sponsorship signage, etc.), I'm entitled to a 12 1/2% royalty of whatever you take in, payable on a quarterly basis.

 

You won't see a whole lot from it in most cases, but with enough time and work, you'd see at least something of an ongoing revenue stream from it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, BrandMooreArt said:

this might be helpful: 

 

 

I saw this about a year ago and it was really enlightening. I was the girl in the video who delivers everything in a $1500 package and I used to feel good about that number. Looking at it now, looking at charging hourly (which I sometimes still do), I would never be able to sustain myself as a full-time freelancer using those pricing models. Now I'm much better about not under-bidding and having an open conversation with the client before hand about what they can expect and why I ask for a certain amount. If I don't talk them into the initial opening bid then they'll almost always come back with a number higher than what I would've bid a few years ago. 

 

A friend of mine asked me to do stuff for his restaurant and his initial offer was tickets to an Ohio State game. I was clear with him, we worked out a fair price, he's referred me to other people because he sees me as legitimate. In my early 20's I probably would've happily taken the tickets because I didn't know what my skillset was worth. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, McCarthy said:

 

I saw this about a year ago and it was really enlightening. I was the girl in the video who delivers everything in a $1500 package and I used to feel good about that number. Looking at it now, looking at charging hourly (which I sometimes still do), I would never be able to sustain myself as a full-time freelancer using those pricing models. Now I'm much better about not under-bidding and having an open conversation with the client before hand about what they can expect and why I ask for a certain amount. If I don't talk them into the initial opening bid then they'll almost always come back with a number higher than what I would've bid a few years ago. 

 

A friend of mine asked me to do stuff for his restaurant and his initial offer was tickets to an Ohio State game. I was clear with him, we worked out a fair price, he's referred me to other people because he sees me as legitimate. In my early 20's I probably would've happily taken the tickets because I didn't know what my skillset was worth. 

 

On the other side of this equation, one of my business activities is consulting start-ups who often need to preserve their initial capital.  At our first meeting I discover what the business concept is.  If I think it has at least a 50-50 chance of being successful, I offer the founder(s) an option with respect to whatever services I am being asked to provide:  a flat rate of X, or a non-voting, equity interest in the company.  I explain that I value the relationship I'm there to develop, that they may want to enlist my services after the start-up phase concludes, and as a de facto partner I'd be available and amenable to providing it when desired.

 

Yes, this has resulted in my doing some work beyond what I'd initially signed on for.  No, it hasn't been a significant amount.

 

But as a result, I currently have something between a 1-5% equity interest in around 75 companies.  Over the two decades I've taken this approach, I've not been 50/50 on success vs. failure (actually, only around a third of my clients survive 7 years without folding; not my fault though; I'm a silent partner unless asked for opinion).  But every year or so one of them reaches a point of maturity where it changes hands or I'm offered a buyout, at which time I cash out, usually for a lot more than what I'dve accepted on a flat rate basis.  In one case 5 years ago, my "cash out" was over 100x what I'dve billed; which alone has been enough to make the practice worthwhile.

 

I don't recommend this idea to everyone, and I only recommend it with respect to start-ups:  smart ones squeeze quarters 'til the eagle screams, even if it means parting with equity in exchange for services.  A business surviving its start-up phase however would laugh you out of the room, and rightly so.  But in the right set of circumstances?  It could be an option worth considering.

Edited by Mac the Knife
grammatical edits

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this