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FC Cincinnati

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52 minutes ago, VancouverFan69 said:

NY Cosmos,

 

 

Yeah, let’s honor the team that killed the original NASL. I can’t stress enough how much that name should die and stay dead.

 

52 minutes ago, VancouverFan69 said:

Toronto Blizzard,

 

Sounds downright corny compared to Toronto FC, which is far more dignified.

 

52 minutes ago, VancouverFan69 said:

 LA Aztecs

 

LA Galaxy exists, while LAFC has a fantastic brand. LA Aztecs is just asking for issues with the Native American/Indigenous Peoples’ name. Heck, San Diego State has had to handle some discontent with their name.

 

52 minutes ago, VancouverFan69 said:

and Tampa Bay Rowdies.

 

They’re around in the USL, but have missed the boat on the expansion racket. Besides, their name wasn’t too bad.

 

North American naming traditions don’t appeal as much to the growing fandom of MLS and the USL. They would rather their leagues use the naming conventions of the rest of the world, to stop being the outlier like they were for most of the disastrous MLS 1.0 period and the failed NASL. It helps get worldwide football fans to take the North American clubs more seriously, not as some sideshow attraction in oversized stadiums playing a bastardized version of the game.

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More of this? The NASL died. What little value was left in it/the Cosmos' brand vanished when the resurrected corpse fell apart. Leave it in the past.

 

Besides, Toronto FC has a MLS title to its name. What did the Blizzard ever accomplish?

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Not to mention that MLS is more popular and successful than even the old NASL could manage.  And there are good reasons for that, one of which is honoring the World’s Game by taking global traditions and making them part of our melting-pot immigrant culture. 

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Well can we start calling the sport by it's proper name here in (North) America, then--or at least make up our minds which it is?  We got a league called "Major League Soccer" with a bunch of, going by the club names, football clubs in it.  Either it's "soccer" or it's "football". Which is it gonna be??

 

(Yeah, that's ground my gears for the longest and continues to do so. And I say this as a fan of the sport.)

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It’s both.  Why do we need to choose?  Nobody seems to mind calling basketball “hoops”.

 

Until the NFL goes away, the league needs to differentiate itself on a national scale. But clubs can adopt either name, based on their own local culture.  Narrowcasting, tailoring to individual communities over the national focus of a television sport, is one of the things I like about this league.   It’s a feature, not a bug. 

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52 minutes ago, SFGiants58 said:

 

Yeah, let’s honor the team that killed the original NASL. I can’t stress enough how much that name should die and stay dead.

 

 

Sounds downright corny compared to Toronto FC, which is far more dignified.

 

 

LA Galaxy exists, while LAFC has a fantastic brand. LA Aztecs is just asking for issues with the Native American/Indigenous Peoples’ name. Heck, San Diego State has had to handle some discontent with their name.

 

 

They’re around in the USL, but have missed the boat on the expansion racket. Besides, their name wasn’t too bad.

 

North American naming traditions don’t appeal as much to the growing fandom of MLS and the USL. They would rather their leagues use the naming conventions of the rest of the world, to stop being the outlier like they were for most of the disastrous MLS 1.0 period and the failed NASL. It helps get worldwide football fans to take the North American clubs more seriously, not as some sideshow attraction in oversized stadiums playing a bastardized version of the game.

 

The Portland Timbers brand along with their outstanding supporters club, Timbers Army are a classic example of why there's nothing wrong North American SOCCER brands. The Vancouver Whitecaps and not "Vancouver City United FC" ignited my interest in The Beautiful Game. If European football supporters want to be snobby about North America's sporting traditions, then that's their problem.

 

We'll just simply agree to disagree. 

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There’s room for both.  Some “Americanized” names, some global names.  Some old, some new. 

 

Nobody’s saying that there can’t be teams like the Rowdies or Timbers.  Nobody’s criticizing them for adopting their own slice of past soccer history.  And yet we do have plenty of people who say just the opposite about Toronto FC and FC Cincinnati.  That’s the only snobbery I see. 

 

Embrace diversity, it’s a strength and not a weakness.  ?

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15 minutes ago, Gothamite said:

There’s room for both.  Some “Americanized” names, some global names.  Some old, some new. 

 

Nobody’s saying that there can’t be teams like the Rowdies or Timbers.  Nobody’s criticizing them for adopting their own slice of past soccer history.  And yet we do have plenty of people who say just the opposite about Toronto FC and FC Cincinnati. 

 

Embrace diversity, it’s a strength and not a weakness.  ?

 

This has nothing to do with diversity. Furthermore, it makes MLS look very inconsistent across the board with its branding. MLS is a North American sports league like the NHL, NBA, MLB, NFL and CFL. The NASL's problems were over-expansion like what MLS is currently doing, having a stupid gimmicky points system that rewarded teams that scored more, overspending and not configuring fans properly in an intimate manner in large stadiums. 

 

I'm of both German and Hungarian-Jewish decent and thanks to the NASL, I love the beautiful game of soccer. What turns me off is how MLS has divided its North American fan base and the snobby arrogance of European(mostly British) soccer/football fans towards North American sports and its traditions.  I have all the respect in the world for the likes of Man United, Chelsea, Liverpool FC, FC Bayern München, Werder Bremen, AC Milan and FC Barcelona. However, if the NASL still existed today, there would still be a lot of love and support for the likes of the ?☀️⚫Fort Lauderdale Strikers(George Best), the ?☀️TB Rowdies(Rodney Marsh), the ???NY Cosmos(Pele??, Giorgio Chinaglia??, Franz Beckenbauer??), the ??️LA Aztecs(Johan Cruyff??), the ?Chicago Sting(Karl-Heinz Granitza??) and ??Toronto Blizzard(Jomo Sono??, Bruce Wilson??).

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16 minutes ago, VancouverFan69 said:

What turns me off is how MLS has divided its North American fan base

 

Say... what, now? :blink:

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11 hours ago, BrandMooreArt said:

 

so, half the lion is in Kentucky?

 

i don't believe all these things are designed into the logo, but lets go ahead and give them the benefit of the doubt. the 7 hills, the 3 feathers, the city on the rise and all that is actually designed into the crest— how lame are those ideas? honestly, the only thing more frustrating than these nonsense "explainers" is the complete lack of substance itself. and with so many ideas in one place, you'd think they would stumble upon one that has some depth. the "fighting German griffin" is pretty close, i think that would have been enough to run with. but, who's going to look at the wing and say "oh yea, 3 because of the years" or "the city name is angled because "we're movin' on up". is that an idea that will last 50 years? the entire thing feels so dead in concept.

 

i can't stand the typography, but i will say the overall aesthetics of the crest is pretty cool. as someone who really loves 60s/70s auto branding, im reminded of that (Gulf or Mobile 1) and i do like the hint of a German influence as well. to me it feels like they made a really good moodboard, had a good direction in mind, then completely lost themselves in cheesy symbolism that doesnt even read without the help from an info graphic. from the same group (i think, not 100% on this) that worked on Juventus and Inter Miami, it seems like a classic case of too many cooks in the kitchen; or an inept final decision maker. 

 

 

I think the real issue here isn’t that this symbolism is present, but that designers and brands feel the need to trumpet it like it actually means something to people. It’s fine if the lion was drawn with three feathers for a reason, but it ultimately means little to a fan. It’s fine if nobody knows why there are three feathers, because they don’t care. Explaining all these little tidbits to death is like walking into Yellowstone saying, “Look at this wood chip! Oh! And this pebble! Have you felt this mud!?” all the while ignoring the vast landscape of beauty that is created by the some of those parts. It puts the audience’s focus exactly where it doesn’t belong, and I think it’s a pretty bad way to present work.

 

I’m still not sure that beginning with *only* an idea is the best way to go about it. You still need a plan and some vision because you have to be able to communicate that idea with aesthetics and branding. Some ideas have deep wells to explore, some have very shallow ones. There are great ideas in both of those categories, and even a great idea can be difficult to communicate. Truth be told, the aesthetics and the way an idea is presented are equally as important as the idea itself. It’s the first impression for 99% of the people who interact with a brand, and just as it’s not wise to sacrifice an idea for the aesthetics, nor should you sacrifice the aesthetics for an idea. It’s always a balance; the two have to support each other. I often assume that people aren’t going to get the idea, and that helps me find ways to communicate it more clearly in the aesthetics.

 

Either way, though, I think there is a 50-year idea here, but it’s being overshadowed by the hollow symbolism. At its core, this is a neo-German club in a city/region (I like to call it the “Bavarian Belt”) that loves its German culture. It’s like the Celtics brand adapted for Cincinnati. Columbus does the same thing, and it’s successful. Milwaukee could pull it off, too. Is it a particularly deep or original idea? No, it’s pretty simplistic and common, as mentioned, but it’s an idea that resonates with Cincinnati and and an idea that will endure for a long, long time, regardless of how many points are on the mane.

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14 minutes ago, Gothamite said:

 

Say... what, now? :blink:

Oh, you didn't know?  It's verrrrry divided. 

 

On one side, you've got passionate soccer fans who love the game and don't give a crap what "naming convention" a team uses.

 

On the other side, you've got people who aren't soccer fans.

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9 minutes ago, andrewharrington said:

I think the real issue here isn’t that this symbolism is present, but that designers and brands feel the need to trumpet it like it actually means something to people.

 

It’s annoying, sure, but I have a hard time really caring about it, since that stuff’ll be all-but-forgotten by the time they actually play their first match.

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3 hours ago, SFGiants58 said:

 

Yeah, let’s honor the team that killed the original NASL. I can’t stress enough how much that name should die and stay dead.

 

 

Sounds downright corny compared to Toronto FC, which is far more dignified.

 

 

LA Galaxy exists, while LAFC has a fantastic brand. LA Aztecs is just asking for issues with the Native American/Indigenous Peoples’ name. Heck, San Diego State has had to handle some discontent with their name.

 

 

They’re around in the USL, but have missed the boat on the expansion racket. Besides, their name wasn’t too bad.

 

North American naming traditions don’t appeal as much to the growing fandom of MLS and the USL. They would rather their leagues use the naming conventions of the rest of the world, to stop being the outlier like they were for most of the disastrous MLS 1.0 period and the failed NASL. It helps get worldwide football fans to take the North American clubs more seriously, not as some sideshow attraction in oversized stadiums playing a bastardized version of the game.

ef8cc02f923dfdb74c3e17972bd4870d_w200.gi

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1 hour ago, andrewharrington said:

 

I think the real issue here isn’t that this symbolism is present, but that designers and brands feel the need to trumpet it like it actually means something to people. It’s fine if the lion was drawn with three feathers for a reason, but it ultimately means little to a fan. It’s fine if nobody knows why there are three feathers, because they don’t care. Explaining all these little tidbits to death is like walking into Yellowstone saying, “Look at this wood chip! Oh! And this pebble! Have you felt this mud!?” all the while ignoring the vast landscape of beauty that is created by the some of those parts. It puts the audience’s focus exactly where it doesn’t belong, and I think it’s a pretty bad way to present work.

 

Did you see this tweet from Todd Radom? 

 

 

:D 

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44 minutes ago, Gothamite said:

 

Did you see this tweet from Todd Radom? 

 

 

:D 

 

I have now, and I love it!

 

Perfectly illustrates that the purpose of a logo is simply to identify something, not necessarily to communicate everything (or, in this case, anything) about the brand. One is not meant to understand and experience the Chicago Cubs through a circle with a word in it. To get what the brand is communicating, one has to soak in the sun, see the white pinstripes, feel the ivy, eat the Vienna beef, taste the Old Style...

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On 11/12/2018 at 8:58 PM, DG_Now said:

This is so obviously the worst MLS logo of all time:

TampaBayMutiny.png

 

And I also like the NYRB logo. Sue me.

Gotta go with the Crayola Revs here.  Can't believe this turd of a logo is still kicking around in 2018

qtfoxrlfgs3gjvif4ao608tia.gif

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11 hours ago, Kaz said:

Gotta go with the Crayola Revs here.  Can't believe this turd of a logo is still kicking around in 2018

qtfoxrlfgs3gjvif4ao608tia.gif

 

Everyone craps on this all the time and while it is absolutely in need for a touchup, I love that the Revs have about as non-traditional crest as it can be.  It's not a roundel, or a shield, it's a blob of a shape that conveys what it needs to.  I'll agree the paintstroke look needs to be gone, but for a team named the "Revolution", you almost have to expect them to be different for the sake of being different.

 

Again, it needs to be refined more.  Cannot stress this enough that I agree it is grossly outdated.  But if they were update I want them to keep the ball/flag shape thing they've had going for over 20 years now.

 

But at least you know who they are at a quick glance and isn't Template Roundel FC or Generic Shield FC where you can literally change the name on the shield and lose nothing. (Looking at you Austin FC)

 

Circling back on topic so we don't derail too far, I like FCC's crest overall.  I do get a Beer Label vibe from it which isn't necessarily bad.  It can definitely work for the team overall. 

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13 hours ago, Gothamite said:

 

Did you see this tweet from Todd Radom? 

 

 

:D 

 

That is absolutely magical.

 

Teach this in design school.

 

 

12 hours ago, andrewharrington said:

 

I have now, and I love it!

 

Perfectly illustrates that the purpose of a logo is simply to identify something, not necessarily to communicate everything (or, in this case, anything) about the brand. One is not meant to understand and experience the Chicago Cubs through a circle with a word in it. To get what the brand is communicating, one has to soak in the sun, see the white pinstripes, feel the ivy, eat the Vienna beef, taste the Old Style...

 

Upthread the discussion was about how logos need to be beautiful and well-crafted, but also effective in communicating the brand they represent. I've been thinking about how the relative youth of MLS factors into this, maybe. The 90s era of MLS gets so much stick for its x-treme corniness, but the current crop of MLS branding is equally representative of its time period, specifically the overly fussy symbolism and the hyperlocal references balanced with globally traditional touchstones and a certain minimalist design aesthetic. It's particularly suitable, though, given the MLS emphasis on authenticity and establishing local roots.

 

The Cubs and the Yankees have logos that don't really reference where they are or even what sport they play. The Yankees didn't need to label each point on the monogram for a borough of New York or something. And yet those logos say everything.

 

So absent that history, maybe the best way to establish your brand as part of the city's fabric is to load up with references that require an infographic. I don't know. Seems to me that FC Cincy does a pretty good job of communicating a uniquely Cincinnati team, but it probably could've been better if we'd let people consult Wikipedia instead of the logo's lion if they're wondering how many years the team was in USL. But it could be worse.

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13 hours ago, Kaz said:

Gotta go with the Crayola Revs here.  Can't believe this turd of a logo is still kicking around in 2018

qtfoxrlfgs3gjvif4ao608tia.gif


I couldn't agree more. In my opinion, the New England Revolution's logo is both poorly-designed and dated... and has been since the moment it was foisted upon the public. The only reason that someone might successfully argue the Revolution didn't sport the absolute worst of Major League Soccer's original team logos is because all of said franchises' inaugural visual identities were absolute abominations.

I'm still of the mind that Mark Walls of St. Paul, Minnesota-based CEMA Graphics designed the best New England Revolution logo/crest I've ever seen.

HQZHaqUl.jpg

This design would ensure continuity of the team's visual identity by retaining elements of the logo that the Revolution have sported since the franchise's inception (namely, the star-paneled soccer ball and U.S. flag striping). At the same time, execution of said components would be rendered in a more visually-appealing fashion and contained within a more traditional shield-shaped badge. 

  

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