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NCAA Votes To Allow College Athletes To Profit From Name, Image And Likeness


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4 minutes ago, BringBackTheVet said:

How do video games work now? Do they use player names or just numbers? In either case, do they have all players on all bcs teams? Maybe you can’t quantify the amount that each contributes to the game, but anyone who’s in it should get some % of it - or allow them to negotiate individually, so Tua or whoever could see just how bad they want him in the game. 

 

There hasn't been an NCAA Football game since 2014 but they used numbers and basic player models with alterations seemingly only differing by size and race.

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6 hours ago, Bucfan56 said:

 

Ultimately, I don’t think it really matters because even though athletes have the ability to profit off of their own names now, most still won’t. If you’re some random member of the Boise State swim team, there’s a good chance you’re not going to be pulling in any endorsement deals anyway. But if you’re Trevor Lawrence? You’re ABSOLUTELY generating revenue for your university.  

 

Its kind of a limited scope of student athletes that this bill really benefits. That being said? It’s still huge because if you have the ability to make money off of your name, why let some random organization (who wouldn’t be effected anyway) arbitrarily say that you can’t? This is simply correcting a mistake, and keeping the NCAA’s rampant greed in check. 

What would prohibit them to start a GoFundMe page with themselves in uniform or announcing their Venmo  If the Iowa State GameDay kid can get money for Natty Light, rower X or wrestler Y can surely get $250/month from somewhere.  Kids who follow the athletes may ask their parents to "donate" or give them money.

 

On the Yahoo College Sports Podcast, Yahoo columnist Pat Forde talked about swimming because his daughter, Brooke, was Pac-12 Freshman of the Year, was on this summer's World Championships team and has qualified for the Olympic Trials.  He mentioned how her already earned money from USA Swimming as a performance bonus totaling $12.5K but cannot take under current NCAA Bylaws it unless it can be justified for training.  IIRC today, Stugotz talked about how the top women's LAX players would easily be able to monetize themselves though just being known within their specific youth sports community, or one's hometown may throw them some dollars.  

 

Recently, we also had the case of the UCF punter who had to stop posting YouTube videos or face ineligibility as he was making money off his 700K subscribers

Edited by dfwabel
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NCAA president Mark Emmert gave his thoughts to The Indianapolis Star on Thursday regarding the signing of SB206.

 

It is exactly as you would expect:  Reactionary, out of touch, with a heavy dose of arrogance.

 

Excerpts:

Quote

 

What is the most extreme impact on college sports that you see as possible under the California law?  

"This is just a new form of professionalism and a different way of converting students into employees," Emmert said. "(They may be) paid in a fashion different than a paycheck, but that doesn't make them not paid."

 

Quote

What worries you the most about the name, image, likeness push? What are people not seeing?

"The biggest worry is that when you have complete unfettered licensing agreements or unfettered endorsement deals, the model of college athletics is negligible at best and maybe doesn't even exist," he said. "Those deals would be arranged with support or engagement of school... so they do become professional employees of schools. That is what most member schools are concerned about, not that people are opposed to have an appropriate way to get some form of (compensation for athletes).

 

Quote

Tell us more about  the choice you believe high school senior athletes should be forced to make?

"We really need to get to a place where it becomes clear to everyone, especially to young men and women who play sports and their families, there needs to be a clear choice," Emmert said. "If you want to be a professional athlete, there ought to be those opportunities. If you look at baseball, for example, a young man at 18 can go out and be a professional baseball player. He can say, 'I can go here or I can go to college and if I go to college I can live by those rules. And then everybody goes by those rules. If he goes to launch his life, he can say, 'I'm not going to get an education, I'm not going to go to campus, I'm not going to play in the College World Series. And that's a free choice they can make."

 

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"The biggest worry is that when you have complete unfettered licensing agreements or unfettered endorsement deals, the model of college athletics is negligible at best and maybe doesn't even exist

 

Yes,that's the  :censored: ing goal, you dumb :censored: 

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Forgive the possibly dumb question, but is there an accepted history about where this modern student-athlete model came from? It's not as if it's some obvious cornerstone of the college experience. TAs don't lead recitations for free because they love anthropology or whatever.

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40 minutes ago, Cosmic said:

Forgive the possibly dumb question, but is there an accepted history about where this modern student-athlete model came from? It's not as if it's some obvious cornerstone of the college experience. TAs don't lead recitations for free because they love anthropology or whatever.

Former NCAA Executive Director Walter Byers coined the term in order to protect schools from paying Worker's Compensation.

 

https://www.wbur.org/onlyagame/2017/10/13/walter-byers-ncaa

 

Quote

In September of 1955, Ray Dennison, an Army vet and father of three, took the field for the Fort Lewis A&M Aggies. On the opening kickoff return, Dennison's helmet collided with the ball carrier’s knee. The base of Dennison's skull was shattered. He died 30 hours later.

His widow, Billie, sued Fort Lewis A&M for workers' comp benefits on behalf of her husband, who'd been a scholarship athlete.

Feeling like the entire amateur system would crumble if schools were forced to pay workers' comp claims for athletes, NCAA executive director Walter Byers met with his legal team and came up with a strategy to make sure no one would mistake a college athlete for an employee entitled to benefits.

Schools were told to refer to players as "student-athletes." They were to speak of "college teams," not "clubs," which was a term used by the pros. They included an amateurism pledge with every scholarship offer.

It worked. Dennison's widow lost her suit, and the term stuck.

 

More from Risk Management Monitor,

This also leads to Taylor Branch's much talked about story in The Atlantic from 2011.

 

In Byers' later years, he believed players should be paid. His 1995 book, "Unsportsmanlike Conduct" illustrated that point. 

 

 

Edited by dfwabel
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1 hour ago, dfwabel said:

 

Seems like a fair response from Coach K, not really taking a side on the issue while also pushing the NCAA towards making changes. I like it.

 

(Speaking of NC, I bet it's less than six months before a fair pay bill is introduced and passed here.)

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So I’m watch “the American game” on espn which basically goes through the history of college football. It has gotten to teams getting caught paying players. You can tell it’s just propaganda to try to prevent fair pay act support. Basically there argument is “paying players won’t stop cheating because players will take the 10,000 standard from the school and still accept extra thousands being offered from the boosters to go to their schools.” Well atleast they are still getting paid it just isn’t illegal, and those that weren’t getting paid before are now getting something.

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Bump for the quote from yesterday.

 

Quote

"You know something is seriously awry. ... The reality is Congress is going to act. We’re coming for you (meaning NCAA). We’re coming to help these athletes."

-Sen. Mitt Romney

 

From CBSsports.com

Quote

Name, image and likeness legislation has taken the NCAA by storm at the state level, but Sen. Mitt Romney (R-UT) said Wednesday that national legislation is also on its way. Romney reassured student-athletes that Congress was going to act to help them despite resistance to state legislation from the NCAA.

Current NCAA rules forbid student-athletes from profiting off of their name, image or likeness in order to maintain eligibility as an amateur.

snip

Romney's comments came at a roundtable with former Duke standout and current ESPN analyst Jay Bilas and Rep. Mark Walker (R-NC) who introduced a federal statute that would apply across every state, among others. Walkers' Student Equity Act would bring above-board payments for name, image and likeness to college athletes at the national level.

"All we're saying is allow these student-athletes to have access to the free market like every other citizen does," Walker said, adding that the NCAA has "refused" to come to the table with lawmakers.

 

Walkers' bill, introduced last spring, would amend the definition of a qualified amateur sports organization in the tax code to remove the restriction on student-athletes using or being compensated for use of their name, image and likeness. 

Former OSU and Colts WR, Rep. Anthony Gonzales will also have a bill, but he wants to stay full Buckeye and will wait until after the NCAA's committee co-chaired by tOSU's AD Gene Smith presents their recommendations.

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On 10/8/2019 at 7:43 PM, dont care said:

So I’m watch “the American game” on espn which basically goes through the history of college football. It has gotten to teams getting caught paying players. You can tell it’s just propaganda to try to prevent fair pay act support. Basically there argument is “paying players won’t stop cheating because players will take the 10,000 standard from the school and still accept extra thousands being offered from the boosters to go to their schools.” Well atleast they are still getting paid it just isn’t illegal, and those that weren’t getting paid before are now getting something.

 

One can believe that players ought to be paid and at the same time think anyone paying players now or in the past should face stiff consequences for breaking the rules then in effect.  There’s no contradiction there. 

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2 minutes ago, Gothamite said:

 

One can believe that players ought to be paid and at the same time think anyone paying players now or in the past should face stiff consequences for breaking the rules then in effect.  There’s no contradiction there. 

So because there is always cheating anyways that means student athletes shouldn’t be paid anyways regardless?

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