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NCAA Votes To Allow College Athletes To Profit From Name, Image And Likeness

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1 minute ago, Gothamite said:

Was that something an interviewee said, or was that the position of the documentary itself?

Both

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2 minutes ago, Gothamite said:

Thanks, I look forward to watching it.  How did the doc establish its point of view?

I can’t remember it’s been awhile, just I remember it getting 3 interviewees to say virtually the same line about how paying players won’t stop cheating and sounded like just propaganda to suppress fair pay acts.

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26 minutes ago, Gothamite said:

Thanks, I look forward to watching it.  How did the doc establish its point of view?

Dave Revsine wrote a book published in 2014 titled, "The Opening Kickoff: The Tumultuous Birth of a Football Nation” ,which details the early years of the sport, how most players weren't even enrolled at the turn of the century and the money which was in the sport over a century ago. 

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Florida's governor chimed in today in support of the bill in the state house.

Quote

Gov. Ron DeSantis on Thursday threw his support behind legislation that would let Florida college athletes to profit from endorsements and similar deals.

Bills filed for the 2020 Legislative Session by House Democratic Leader Kionne McGhee (HB 251) and GOP state Rep. Chip LaMarca (HB 287) would allow such sports players to make money from their “name, image or likeness,” similar to professional athletes.

In a Thursday morning press conference, DeSantis said he agreed with California’s approach, where Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom, who signed similar legislation into law last month. That measure goes into effect Jan. 1, 2023.

 

“I support the direction that these legislators are going,” the Republican Governor said, with McGhee and LaMarca standing next to him. “I think this is something the Legislature should tackle this coming Session.”

He added he was sure there was a way for students to be paid while maintaining the integrity of college sports. The Florida bills, if passed and signed this year, go into effect July 1.

During the presser, DeSantis also said he misses playing EA NCAA Football.

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2 hours ago, goalieboy82 said:

Any proposal from this working group tomorrow will be the basis for federal legislation that the NCAA wants Anthony Gonzales bring to Congress since Gene Smith is co-chair.

 

Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowslby told the Des Moines Register last week that the working group will propose reforms more restrictive than what SB206 has into law or other state legislation.

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NCAA Votes To Allow College Athletes To Profit From Name, Image And Likeness

October 29, 2019 - 19:21 PM

The NCAA Board of Governors on Tuesday afternoon unanimously voted to allow college athletes to profit from their name, image and likeness in a “manner consistent with the collegiate model” and directed the three divisions of college sports to immediately […]

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1 hour ago, TrueYankee26 said:

You gotta read the fine print (bolded by me):

Quote

 

In the Association’s continuing efforts to support college athletes, the NCAA’s top governing board voted unanimously to permit students participating in athletics the opportunity to benefit from the use of their name, image and likeness in a manner consistent with the collegiate model.

 

The Board of Governors’ action directs each of the NCAA’s three divisions to immediately consider updates to relevant bylaws and policies for the 21st century, said Michael V. Drake, chair of the board and president of The Ohio State University.

 

“We must embrace change to provide the best possible experience for college athletes,” Drake said. “Additional flexibility in this area can and must continue to support college sports as a part of higher education. This modernization for the future is a natural extension of the numerous steps NCAA members have taken in recent years to improve support for student-athletes, including full cost of attendance and guaranteed scholarships.”

 

Specifically, the board said modernization should occur within the following principles and guidelines:  

  • Assure student-athletes are treated similarly to non-athlete students unless a compelling reason exists to differentiate. 
  • Maintain the priorities of education and the collegiate experience to provide opportunities for student-athlete success. 
  • Ensure rules are transparent, focused and enforceable and facilitate fair and balanced competition. 
  • Make clear the distinction between collegiate and professional opportunities. 
  • Make clear that compensation for athletics performance or participation is impermissible. 
  • Reaffirm that student-athletes are students first and not employees of the university. 
  • Enhance principles of diversity, inclusion and gender equity. 
  • Protect the recruiting environment and prohibit inducements to select, remain at, or transfer to a specific institution.

The board’s action was based on comprehensive recommendations from the NCAA Board of Governors Federal and State Legislation Working Group, which includes presidents, commissioners, athletics directors, administrators and student-athletes. The group gathered input over the past several months from numerous stakeholders, including current and former student-athletes, coaches, presidents, faculty and commissioners across all three divisions. The board also directed continued and productive engagement with legislators. 

 

The working group will continue to gather feedback through April on how best to respond to the state and federal legislative environment and to refine its recommendations on the principles and regulatory framework. The board asked each division to create any new rules beginning immediately, but no later than January 2021.

“As a national governing body, the NCAA is uniquely positioned to modify its rules to ensure fairness and a level playing field for student-athletes,” NCAA President Mark Emmert said. “The board’s action today creates a path to enhance opportunities for student-athletes while ensuring they compete against students and not professionals.”

 

 

 

Edited by dfwabel
Added Skinner's tweet in response of the news

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A step in the right direction but we're still a ways away from NCAA video games. 

 

As much as I'd like to believe EA was developing a game behind the scenes waiting for this news, that just isn't logical. 

 

But it's better news than we've had in a long time!! 

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1 hour ago, BigDmo said:

A step in the right direction but we're still a ways away from NCAA video games. 

 

As much as I'd like to believe EA was developing a game behind the scenes waiting for this news, that just isn't logical. 

 

But it's better news than we've had in a long time!! 

They actually have the assets since they've included 10 NCAA teams for their Superstar/Face of the Franchise for Madden20. Realistically, EA would need to make a deal with the overall licensing group and that would take time. 

 

I wonder if the workaround is to simply bump up the cost of attendance payments. I could also see schools start selling football and basketball jerseys with each kids name and number available with a set percentage for each jersey sold. Fanatics would be the biggest winner if this isn't allowed at separate school stores. It still won't help volleyball and lacrosse players as much as it will the big money sports so it will be interesting to see how this ultimately gets implemented.

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4 minutes ago, dannykraft said:

Any idea if player jerseys will be for sale?

 

Nothing would go into effect until 2021 at the earliest across all NCAA Divisions.  They gave no additional details other than this statement.

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17 hours ago, dfwabel said:

Nothing would go into effect until 2021 at the earliest across all NCAA Divisions.  They gave no additional details other than this statement.

I can think of one way these guys could get extra money, Insta-fame. It's what led one player for UCF to quit football when the NCAA told him to pick one of the other:

https://www.cbssports.com/college-football/news/ucf-kicker-ruled-ineligible-after-refusing-to-agree-to-terms-over-youtube-channel/

 

The big issue is whether or not the NCAA will allow these accounts to make money or not. I think for the NCAA this may not be a direct revenue stream but if you have players with monetized accounts talking up the college experience and giving a rose colored glasses view of college sports it will help them in the long run while letting the athletes pocket money now. For the Olympic sports and non money-making teams this would be a boon.

 

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Prior to yesterday's NCAA statement regarding NIL, this occurred on Monday and I won't be surprised if NBPA joins in too.

Bolded by me

Quote

National College Players Association and NFL Players Association to Explore Marketing and Licensing of College Athletes

 

Under the NFLPA’s subsidiary, REP Worldwide, the NCPA will seek ways to prepare for group licensing of college athletes in all sports as legislation takes effect

The NFL Players Association (NFLPA) and the National College Players Association (NCPA) are pleased to announce a collaborative effort to explore how college athletes from all sports can finally receive fair compensation for use of their name, image and likeness. Under REP Worldwide, the group licensing subsidiary of NFL Players, Inc., we will look to advance and market the group licensing rights of college athletes of all sports. 

 

To date, college athletes’ group licensing and broadcast rights have been sold by schools, conferences, and the NCAA. These organizations take all revenues and profit derived off the athletes’ work without even acknowledging that athletes deserve a fair share. Under this new partnership, the NFLPA and the NCPA will explore opportunities for merchandise, gaming and other officially licensed products. We will also review how recent developments impact television broadcast revenues in pursuit of fairness.

College athlete group licensing will be possible in 2023 thanks to the California Fair Pay to Play Act, which was co-sponsored by the NCPA. The law grants college athletes the ability to secure professional and legal representation, and to receive compensation for use of their name, image and likeness starting in 2023.

 

Currently, REP Worldwide represents and has signed partners for the Women’s National Basketball Players Association (WNBPA), United States Women’s National Team Players Association (USWNTPA), Major League Soccer Players Association (MLSPA) and United States Rugby Players Association (USRPA).

 

“I am grateful that college athletes will finally have representation that cares only about fairness for the athletes. We are on the right side of history and invite the NCAA’s commercial partners to join us. It’s time to embrace a new beginning. America should be a place where all citizens can benefit from free enterprise and equal rights are guaranteed,” stated former UCLA football player and NCPA Executive Director Ramogi Huma.  

 

“REP Worldwide was created to offer all athletes the same world class service that NFL players have when companies want to partner with athletes to market their likeness, image and personalities," said NFLPA Executive Director and NFL Players, Inc. Chairman DeMaurice Smith. “We are proud to partner with the NCPA to offer this service to students who are also athletes. For the first time, a legislature has indicated that these students have rights just like everyone else and we support this continuing movement towards fairness.”

 

“Our business is built on the foundation that athletes in all sports have rights beyond their work,” said NFL Players Inc. President Ahmad Nassar. “By entering into this partnership, our work with the NCPA will ensure that athletes are supported in a meaningful way.”

The NCPA also plans to design an injured athletes fund derived from generated revenues, because colleges too often leave their current and former players to pay out-of-pocket sports related medical bills. The fund would also assist former players who suffer with cognitive disability associated with contact sports and yet have been ignored by NCAA sports.

 

This collaboration will ensure group licensing representation is available to every college athlete whose state passes a law to allow it. California is the only state that has adopted this law to date, but lawmakers from at least 10 other states have taken steps to introduce similar legislation, including Florida, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, Pennsylvania and South Carolina, with Florida and Pennsylvania lawmakers considering legislation that would be effective as of 2020. The NCPA is doing all it can to ensure lawmakers from all states adopt model legislation posted on its web site. In addition, the NCPA is calling on parents of recruits to contact their lawmakers and urge them to support this effort.

 

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4 hours ago, MJWalker45 said:

I can think of one way these guys could get extra money, Insta-fame. It's what led one player for UCF to quit football when the NCAA told him to pick one of the other:

https://www.cbssports.com/college-football/news/ucf-kicker-ruled-ineligible-after-refusing-to-agree-to-terms-over-youtube-channel/

 

The big issue is whether or not the NCAA will allow these accounts to make money or not. I think for the NCAA this may not be a direct revenue stream but if you have players with monetized accounts talking up the college experience and giving a rose colored glasses view of college sports it will help them in the long run while letting the athletes pocket money now. For the Olympic sports and non money-making teams this would be a boon.

 

Dr. Michael Drake to The Athletic's Dana O'Neil yesterday.

Quote

O’Neil: I offered a hypothetical situation: Quarterback X from School Y has a great season and a car dealership wants to pay him $50,000 to endorse its cars. Is that OK? The short answer, doubtful. The long answer:

Drake: From our point of view, we imagine there will be a range of interactions and relationships. Some will be straightforward and easy. If you were a guitar player while in high school, and you keep it up and it doesn’t affect your work on the lacrosse team, that’s easy. There will be others that are more problematic, where it looks more like compensation for pay-to-play in a different form of currency. That’s the challenge.

Emmert: In your hypothetical, the working group has said, “Look, that’s the end of the continuum of name, image and likeness, and it’s the most challenging and difficult to regulate.” They didn’t say, “No, never go there.” But only go there if you can come up with a regulatory regime. Otherwise, it’s pay-for-play in some other guise.

 

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