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Tips to catch'n a logo theft


iDonovan

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Would I be correct in assuming the type of 'person' who would steal such logos and then claim them to be his own, would most likely not be savvy enough with the various development programs to find such hidden trails.

Like this guy.

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Would I be correct in assuming the type of 'person' who would steal such logos and then claim them to be his own, would most likely not be savvy enough with the various development programs to find such hidden trails.

Like this guy.

Like anything, it's not 100%, but it will catch some of them.

If someone is good with the programs, nothing would be able to stop them (just ask Puckguy as I washed away a watermark of his then showed him (just for fun) one night)

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In my limited experience with Photoshop and Illustrator, I usually use the mapping tool to make logos that I usually ask someone to color in. The thing with the Path option is that you can make the shapes as tiny as possible and still color them in. In order to see them look good though, you'd have to load the image at like 2000% percent or so. I'm thinking, what if you were to map out an ID icon or such to incredibly tiny proportions and hide it in a non-descrepit part of the logo (like a corner or something) and color it in an ever so slightly off-color of it's adjecents? They wouldn't notice it in PS, especially if it's for read-only and print purposes. All you would need to do then is open it giganto, copy and paste (or Print Screen) it in MS Paint, paint bucket a spot around it (or do the eyedropper / right-click-eraser function) and BOOM, you've got the outline of your ID. Mind you they'd probably pick up on it if they use AI, but at that point you should make it read-only.

I have no clue if that's what everyone else was implying. I have no knowledge on working with PDF's other than viewing them.

--Roger "Time?" Clemente.

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I was often told by profs. in school that a quick way to document when you

created something was to mail a copy of it to yourself, the postmark would

prove the creation date. I wonder how this would hold true in the digital world.

E-mailing yourself files to document when it was created possibly. I still think there's nothing wrong with putting a ® on a design. All the ® means is that you're in process

of registering it for trademark. When it comes to clients, who's to say you're not

actually doing that. I've done it before and it's always made people take me and

the work more serious.

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