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Recreating Fenway


Brass

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Well I got this crazy idea while I was about to through away a bunch of white cardboard, "Hey, why not try to create Fenway Park with it?" So one of my fun projects on my spare time will be to recreate Fenway Park. I started last night, and right now I have the Green Monster and the lights done. Here is the progress!

Comments and suggestions for my quest to recreate Fenway would be appreciated!

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You forgot the National League out-of-town board.

It's there, look all the way to the right of the scoreboard...to the left of the Bob's ad, and you see that there's only one game that day. Atlanta vs NY Mets.

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When I was younger I actually made paper models of stadiums that I designed myself. What I liked about this one I made six years ago was that the right field wall acted as a facade for an arena. Yes, that roof was foldable so you can see inside the arena. :)

100_0064_1.jpg

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A few years ago there was a book called "Build it Yourself Fenway Park". It was printed on heavy stock (business card thickness), and was constructed to scale. All one needed was an exacto knife and a big bottle of Elmer's glue, and the whole thing was less than 3 feet square.

The book was written by Len Martin, but it currently out of print, though there are plans for an updated 2005 version. He also created one for Forbes Field.

His website is here:

http://www.pointfourltd.com/documents/pfsportshub.html

Good luck with your project. And your scoreboard needs to be extended as far as the Bob's sign, you didn't leave enough room for the National Leagye scores, which were added two years ago. Don't forget the morse code in the vertical white lines, and the little slots where the scorebard workers can watch the game! :)

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When I was younger I actually made paper models of stadiums that I designed myself. What I liked about this one I made six years ago was that the right field wall acted as a facade for an arena. Yes, that roof was foldable so you can see inside the arena. :)

100_0064_1.jpg

howd you keep it up? whats it made of? i would like totry that

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At the ESPN Zone in Denver -- they have a model of Coors Field constructed completely of Coors Light boxes, bottle caps, and crumpled up labels serve as the crowd.

I'll try and find a picture if I can.

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When I was younger I actually made paper models of stadiums that I designed myself. What I liked about this one I made six years ago was that the right field wall acted as a facade for an arena. Yes, that roof was foldable so you can see inside the arena. :)

100_0064_1.jpg

dude we are both dorks, i did that with legos. hell when i design now, i break out legos and scale it to make sure the proportions are right.

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When I was younger I actually made paper models of stadiums that I designed myself. What I liked about this one I made six years ago was that the right field wall acted as a facade for an arena. Yes, that roof was foldable so you can see inside the arena. :)

100_0064_1.jpg

howd you keep it up? whats it made of? i would like totry that

Do you notice some shiny areas on the model? That's tape. The model is actually made of computer paper. What I did was I divided the stadium into sections, seating, outer facades etc. I used trigonometry to make speicific cut-outs, colour them, fold them in the appropriate places and tape it onto the base. To make it stand up I make a flap in the cut-out to hold it onto the base.

The one I posted was the last one I did. I did so many others, but they were not as accurately done as this one. Anyone who visited my basement when I was a teenager were really impressed of the models that I've done. The model is fragile, so any excesssive force on it is not recommended.

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When I was younger I actually made paper models of stadiums that I designed myself. What I liked about this one I made six years ago was that the right field wall acted as a facade for an arena. Yes, that roof was foldable so you can see inside the arena. :)

100_0064_1.jpg

howd you keep it up? whats it made of? i would like totry that

Do you notice some shiny areas on the model? That's tape. The model is actually made of computer paper. What I did was I divided the stadium into sections, seating, outer facades etc. I used trigonometry to make speicific cut-outs, colour them, fold them in the appropriate places and tape it onto the base. To make it stand up I make a flap in the cut-out to hold it onto the base.

The one I posted was the last one I did. I did so many others, but they were not as accurately done as this one. Anyone who visited my basement when I was a teenager were really impressed of the models that I've done. The model is fragile, so any excesssive force on it is not recommended.

did you say trigonometry? i was gonna try to do this, but not after you said that, my math skills are well, the're bad, which is why i could never be an architect and designing stadiums for me means drawing them on paper.

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First of all, it's just computer paper, nothing else, except a few toothpicks here and there. I was still a teenager when I did this, and I did not end up in architecture as my field of study.

For the way I do my models, computer paper is much cheaper and easier to fold. Maybe one day I'll post a picture of a section just to illustrate how I do this for one section. Remember the seats are represented by the coloured areas of a flat face, not a bunch of folds.

A couple of things, though, for my models, the field level is always the same as the ground level, which is not the case for many modern stadiums. So, having a strong foundation as my base would have made those stadiums that more realistic. Also my models are really a bunch of straight lines. That simplifies everything.

I draw out a side sectional view just to figure out the slope of the seating level(s) and a top view to help me make my cutouts. You don't really need trig for the cutouts, I just use it to save time.

I must say though, I have always been impressed by the models professional architects make. Josh, is matteboard or chipboard used to make those type of models?

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