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What Would Happen in this Situation?


kingssss

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There are runners on first and third and 1 out in the inning. The team at bat attempts a squeeze play. On the bunt attempt, the ball bounces off home plate and straight into the air. The runner steps on home, and the umpire calls him safe, but the ball then hits the runner that just scored while it was coming back down and he unintentionally knocks the ball into foul territory. After all this settled, what would be the ruling for all the runners, where should they be on the bases and should they be out or safe.

I dont know the answer, this just came up the other day and i was wondering what you guys thought should happen.

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I agree with Chris on the player scoring before he touched the ball. He is no longer a live runner. However, if he knocks the ball intentionally foul then the batter would be considered out. It is kind of like when a catcher tries to throw out a runner on first attempting to steal second and is blocked intentionally by the batter so he may not throw the ball cleanly.

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Once the runner scores, he is not considered a live baserunner. So if the batted ball hits him once he has officially scored the run, it is just like the ball hitting the base coach (as said before). If he is ruled to have intentionally touched/deflected the batted ball after he scored, the batter would be declared out for interference.

But?

A batted ball that touches a runner that just scored would most likely be called a foul ball, unless the ball touches the runner at the same time he steps on home. It's the umpire's judgment of the ball's position when it touches the runner. If it touches any part of the runner that hangs over foul territory (like an outstretched arm, for example), then it's a foul ball, and the runner retreats to third base.

I've probably made this sound more complicated than it really is. But weird stuff happens frequently in lower levels of baseball. A lot of it when I'm working the plate as well.

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Wouldn't it be a foul ball if the bunt hits the plate before any other part of the field?

No. Home plate is in fair territory, so I would assume it's just the same as batting a ball off the dirt in front of the plate...

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After all this, I forgot to answer the question? :D

One out, runners at first and second.

(Assuming no one could reach the deflected ball and throw out the batter-runner going to first. If he was slow and therefore thrown out, you have two outs, runner at second.)

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After all this, I forgot to answer the question? :D

One out, runners at first and second.

(Assuming no one could reach the deflected ball and throw out the batter-runner going to first. If he was slow and therefore thrown out, you have two outs, runner at second.)

Considering how the runner from third reaches home plate just as the ball comes down and hits him, I would assume that was one hell of a hiiiiiiiiiiiiiiigh pop-up off the plate. Unless it's John Olerud running to first, the batter's definitely gotta be safe without a problem. :D

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Maybe I'm missing something, but it sounds like the first thing the ball makes contact with is the the runner that just scored, that I'm assuming is now off of home plate and in foul territory.

Therefore, wouldn't it be treated the same way if the runner was hit by the ball before he scored?

Cause if the runner was hit in foul territory, its a foul ball. That's why you are taught to take a lead in foul territory because if a batted ball hits you in fair territory, you are out but if its in foul, its a dead ball.

So therefore, it'd be like a foul ball hit and run. Just because a runner stole a base before a ball was called foul, doesn't mean he gets to keep that base. He'd have to return to to his original base.

So to me, shouldn't it just be 1st and 3rd with the batter recieving a strike and more than likely the next pitch in his ear to protect against the squeeze?

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Maybe I'm missing something, but it sounds like the first thing the ball makes contact with is the the runner that just scored, that I'm assuming is now off of home plate and in foul territory.

"On the bunt attempt, the ball bounces off home plate and straight into the air"

Hits home plate first then up into the air.

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Correct. but it's not necessarily what the ball contacts next, it's where the ball makes contact with something.

I think a good assumption of this situation would be a suicide squeeze (or just a very fast runner coming in from third base). Batted ball hits home plate, bounces straight up. The runner comes down the line from third, presumably on the foul side of the foul line, so if his body makes contatc with the ball it's immediately called a foul ball.

The runner comes across home plate. So at least some part of the runner's body would be in fair territory, because home plate is entirely in fair territory. If the batted ball makes contact with the runner's body over fair territory (after the run has scored), then it's a fair ball. It's not a dead ball, unless the umpire feels that the contact with the ball was intentional. Even then, it's all a matter of timing to see what happened first: runner touches home plate (scoring, batter/runner is declared out), or ball touches runner (dead ball, runner is out).

If the batted ball touches any part of the scoring runner's body that hangs over foul territory, it's a fall ball, all runners go back to the base they were on at the time of the pitch.

Once the run has scored, that runner is no longer considered a "live" baserunner. He is just simply on-field personnel, much like an umpire, base coach or bat boy.

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