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Bowling Green concept


vicfurth

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Why does Bowling Green use no green? I don't know...

Because its colors are orange and brown. Why does Texas A&M use no blue? Because its colors are maroon and white. Simple as that. Universities choose colors for a reason, whether it is to be unique (there are no other orange and brown MAC teams) or for some other reason. The colors are the colors, and they should never be changed in the case of a university. Bowling Green State University was not named after a color, so it has no obligation to use any color in its scheme. Its fathers chose brown and orange as its colors, and the rest is history.

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Why does Bowling Green use no green? I don't know...

Because its colors are orange and brown. Why does Texas A&M use no blue? Because its colors are maroon and white. Simple as that. Universities choose colors for a reason, whether it is to be unique (there are no other orange and brown MAC teams) or for some other reason. The colors are the colors, and they should never be changed in the case of a university. Bowling Green State University was not named after a color, so it has no obligation to use any color in its scheme. Its fathers chose brown and orange as its colors, and the rest is history.

Amen to that.

A bowling green is just what it sounds like: a long, well-groomed lawn for lawn bowling (bocce if you're Italian). They were quite common in England. I'd guess that the town of Bowling Green, Ohio was named for such a place, and the school for such a town.

As tempest said, the founding fathers (or someone in BGSU's history) adopted brown and orange as their colors. And so they are, and so they should remain. There's been a lot of people recently throwing odd colors into the palettes of colleges. WHY?!?! This isn't as easy as the pro teams changing colors for the sake of marketing, but even those teams have their colors usually stemming from historical reasons, or at least traditions. Colleges are far more deeply attached to their school colors. Thousands and thousands of alumni spend millions of dollars wearing these sometimes hideous colors in public in a show of pride and love for the school they went to.

The powers that were at Bowling Green didn't think green needed to be a school color. Respect their choices, and use the color palette you're given.

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From the Bowling Green State University web site:

"The school colors, burnt orange and dark brown, were originated by Prof. Leon L. Winslow of the industrial arts department. He first saw the striking color combination on a woman?s hat in the Toledo Union inter-urban trolley station and was taken by its appeal. His recommendation to the Board of Trustees that these colors be adopted was subsequently passed."

So, basically their school colors are modeled after old ladies headwear. Makes perfect sense to me.

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So, basically their school colors are modeled after old ladies headwear. Makes perfect sense to me.

And your beloved Terps took their colors from the Maryland state flag, which came from the coats of arms of the families of Lord Baltimore's father and mother. So your school's colors came from 2 old British shields. What's your point?

It doesn't matter what inspired a school to adopt its colors. What matters is that the school colors have been passed down over many generations, have been glorified in song, and have become among the most visible symbols of a given college or university. Every school has traditions that people who didn't go there find strange, dorky or weird. But that's the point - they're traditions that are special to those who uphold them. A school should not sell itself out and flush centuries of tradition down the toilet for the sake of marketing and pandering to people who are generally not alumni.

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