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What exactly does "vectorize" mean?


rocketsan22

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Vectorizing basically means drawing it in a program like Adobe Illustrator, which is a vector drawing program. The benefit of having a logo in vector format is that you can scale is as big or as small as you want with no distortion. For the purposes of billboards, uniforms, and the likes, having a scalable logo is a huge plus.
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^ Good explanation

Usually, you'll want vector versions for flat art (like logos or uniform templates). You would use Illustrator, Freehand or other vector based programs to manipulate them. The benefit of this file type is that you can shrink or expand these images without affecting image loss or file size. The accepted file format is EPS.

Photos are raster images, which is an entirely different beast altogether...

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Rockzilla gave the most accurate description of VECTOR.

Vector refers to COORDINATES (you may have heard the word VECTOR used in military movies when they are looking at a map and ask for the vectors)

Like Rockzilla said, it is based on mathematics and the differential between coordinates which allows for the smooth resizing of an object without distortion.

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i work with photoshop and illustrator all day, everyday (12 years now). photoshop vector files work well with any vector based graphics program. the exported vector paths do not retain any color or layer effects, but that's why adobe has illustrator. if you only had photoshop and used the pen tool to create a logo, the exported file would be a empty path that you can import into any graphics program and assign nessessary color information. this is not the intended use for photoshop, though as it is primarly used for raster based (pixels) photo manipulation/creation.

if you want to learn more about vector format from photoshop, do a google search on "paths", "layer masks", or "exporting paths to illustrator" for photoshop. there are plenty of tutorials on this on the web.

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