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cotton bowl midfield logo


JBPerry

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remember how they used to have the piece of cotton at midfield for the Texas/OU games and the Cotton Bowl Classic? well, no longer. they're now putting the AT&T Cotton Bowl Classic logo at midfield. that stinks because even though they had the SBC logo at I think the 30 yard line of each side, they still kept the piece of cotton at mid field.:cursing::blink:

here's a pic

cotton_bowl_field.jpg

the part of the field in the box is what I'm saying is now gone

cb2.jpg

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thats actually not a bad looking corp. sponsership logo. could be ten times worse

i don't mind the at&t cotton bowl logo, it's just the piece of cotton tells you you're at the cotton bowl (stadium) in dallas.

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Actually, for the Cotton Bowl game they've done the full corporate logo for quite a while. I think the single "piece of cotton" logo has only been used at midfield for the Red River Shootout/Rivalry game. Here are some photos from recent years:

2000 Arkansas vs. Texas

2000cotton.jpg

2001 Kansas State vs. Tennessee

cottonbowl1cx.jpg

2002 Arkansas vs. Oklahoma

2002_halftime_nguyen.jpg

2003 LSU vs. Texas

2003_lsu_entrance_deluca.jpg

2004 Ole Miss vs. Oklahoma State

2004_stadium_fox.jpg

2005 Texas A&M vs. Tennessee

ariel.jpg

Even back in the early 90's when it was the Mobil Cotton Bowl, and the field had an astroturf playing surface, the game had a corporate midfield logo:

miami4db.jpg

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Is it me, or is the Cotton Bowl a small stadium?  Will the Cotton Bowl move to the new Cowboys Stadium once it is opened?

The Cotton Bowl is a pretty large stadium, listed capacity is 72,260, though last year's game between Texas A&M and Tennessee drew 75,704. However, the stadium is pretty dilapidated and is in need of a major renovation project. There's been some talk about moving the Cotton Bowl game (especially if they want it upgraded to a BCS game) and the Oklahoma/Texas game to the new Cowboys stadium, but there has been a $50 million proposal to renovate the existing Cotton Bowl stadium.

DALLAS -- The Cotton Bowl would add more than 16,000 seats and undergo extensive remodeling under a plan unveiled Monday, but the city's mayor warned that the home of the Texas-Oklahoma game must receive new commitments before renovations are approved.

The nearly $50 million proposal would upgrade seats, concession stands, scoreboards and restrooms to the decaying 75-year-old stadium. Seating capacity would increase to 92,100 under the 34-proposal that was to be submitted to the City Council.

Frustrated with the deteriorating facility, athletic directors from Texas and Oklahoma have threatened to exercise an opt-out after 2007 and switch the Red River Rivalry to a home-and-home series.

Dallas Mayor Laura Miller said she wants extended commitments from schools before making improvements. Miller said in Monday's online edition of The Dallas Morning News that if the city doesn't receive long-term pledges, "then we won't upgrade the Cotton Bowl."

Prairie View-Grambling and the AT&T Cotton Bowl Classic are the only other football games the stadium hosts. The city has been trying to lure Texas A&M and Texas Tech to play its annual game at Fair Park.

Before this year's game, Texas athletic director DeLoss Dodds said he wanted to keep the Texas-Oklahoma game in Dallas but was not optimistic. He said he would find it difficult for the city to commit so much money to a stadium that hosts only a handful of games each year.

But Miller told the newspaper that negotiations were "going very well" between Texas and Oklahoma and that she expected an announcement in January.

"We won't lose it. We're not going to lose it," Miller said.

Since 1929, the border rivalry has been played in Dallas, roughly halfway between the campuses in Norman, Okla., and Austin. The stadium is equally divided between burnt orange-clad Texas fans and crimson-wearing Sooners and anchors the surrounding State Fair of Texas.

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I'd rather see the Big XII champion get an automatic bid to the Cotton Bowl rather than the Fiesta Bowl. This would make the Cotton Bowl, a game with more history and longevity than the Fiesta Bowl, a BCS Game. It would then push the Fiesta Bowl back to the same level as the Capital One Bowl and other games made for second place teams.

The piece of cotton logo is awesome, and it should eternally remain at the 50 yard line of the stadium.

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I'd rather see the Big XII champion get an automatic bid to the Cotton Bowl rather than the Fiesta Bowl. This would make the Cotton Bowl, a game with more history and longevity than the Fiesta Bowl, a BCS Game. It would then push the Fiesta Bowl back to the same level as the Capital One Bowl and other games made for second place teams.

No team gets an automatic bid to the Fiesta Bowl. The Fiesta Bowl has no conference tie ins. In a normal year (Unlike this year, with Texas being in the national championship game) the Big 12 champ goes to Orange Bowl. That's the historic Orange Bowl tie-in. The Big 8 winner would go to the Orange Bowl, when the SWC disbanded the Big 8 became the Big 12.

As far a the Fiesta Bowl goes before the BCS it had hosted a few "National Championship Games" between Independent teams. That's how it became a BCS Bowl.

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the ACC only got a team to the Sugar once before FSU came into the league, that was in 1990 when UVa went. Traditionally, the ACC champ goes to the Citrus/Tangerine Bowl (I hate the new name). They only started getting a team to the big time games when FSU joined (and it was always FSU). The only exception before then was ClemPson winning the National Championship in the Orange bowl in '81 or so. The ACC was on par with today's Big East until FSU joined. I actually miss the old days when the champ would play on New Year's Day in Orlando, but I guess the BCS is the BCS, and the opportunity to make the Sugar or Orange is enticing.

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At one time, there was talk of doming the Cotton Bowl. This was around 1997-1999. No chance of that happening now.

I think the Phoenix area just made itself more attractive than Dallas, throwing more money around. That's how the Fiesta Bowl passed the Cotton Bowl.

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When there was no BCS

Rose

Pac 10

vs.

Big 10

Sugar

ACC

vs.

SEC

Orange

Big East

vs.

Big 12

Fiesta

WAC

vs.

Anybody they could get (normally Notre Dame)

Then the WAC dissolved and then it became independent teams

The Rose Bowl is the only major bowl to have had two conference tie-ins. The Big EIGHT was tied into the Orange Bowl and the SEC champ went to the Sugar Bowl. As for the WAC (which still exists today albeit in much different form), their champ went to the Holiday Bowl. As far as I know, the Fiesta Bowl has never had a conference champ tie-in, which is how they got to host the 1986 national championship (in 1987 after New Year's Day -- the Vinny Testaverde five-pick loss to Penn State).

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from Wikipedia:

"The creation of Fiesta Bowl grew out of the frustration of the Western Athletic Conference in trying to obtain suitable bowl invitiations for its champions. In 1968 and 1969, respectively, champions Wyoming and Arizona State failed to obtain any invitation, while in 1970, undefeated Arizona State was bypassed by the major bowls and had to settle for a less prestigious Peach Bowl appearance. The Fiesta Bowl therefore initially provided an automatic bowl tie-in for the Western Athletic Conference champion"

Upon review the Sugar Bowl had SEC and an at large team

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I'd rather see the Big XII champion get an automatic bid to the Cotton Bowl rather than the Fiesta Bowl. This would make the Cotton Bowl, a game with more history and longevity than the Fiesta Bowl, a BCS Game. It would then push the Fiesta Bowl back to the same level as the Capital One Bowl and other games made for second place teams.

No team gets an automatic bid to the Fiesta Bowl. The Fiesta Bowl has no conference tie ins. In a normal year (Unlike this year, with Texas being in the national championship game) the Big 12 champ goes to Orange Bowl. That's the historic Orange Bowl tie-in. The Big 8 winner would go to the Orange Bowl, when the SWC disbanded the Big 8 became the Big 12.

As far a the Fiesta Bowl goes before the BCS it had hosted a few "National Championship Games" between Independent teams. That's how it became a BCS Bowl.

That's all fine and dandy, but you're wrong. I am 100% positive the Big 12 Champion gets an automatic bid to the Fiesta Bowl. It even says so right here on the BCS website.

The BCS also notes the importance of traditional and regional considerations regarding team selection. Specifically, the four BCS Bowls will host the following conference champions in the years the national championship game is not played at their site.

These consideration tie-ins include the ACC or Big East champion in the FedEx Orange Bowl, the SEC champion in the Nokia Sugar Bowl, the Big Ten and the Pac-10 champions in the Rose Bowl and the Big 12 champion in the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl.

The Big 12 Champion has been ranked No. 2 the last two years, and the Fiesta Bowl was the National Championship Game in 2002, but remember Colorado playing Oregon in the 2001 Fiesta Bowl? Kansas State playing Ohio State in the 2003 Fiesta Bowl?

Before the BCS, the ACC Champion usually migrated around between the Orange and Sugar Bowls after Florida State joined and gave it a reason to be in a big bowl game. The Fiesta Bowl was made for the WAC. The Big 12 is relatively new, not very much older than the BCS itself. It's Champion usually ended up wherever it would fit in the big bowl games for those first few years.

Tradtionally, the SEC Champion has long played in the Sugar Bowl. The Big East and Big 8 Champions played the Orange Bowl. The Big 10 and Pac 10 Champions played in the Rose Bowl. There was no Big 12, and the ACC wasn't strong enough to warrant a spot.

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Tradtionally, the . . . Big East and Big 8 Champions played the Orange Bowl.

You're wrong on half of this. Big East football didn't exist until Miami joined the conference, and they never had a tie-in with the Orange Bowl. On the other hand, the Big 8 champion always played in the Orange Bowl.

The following list of results should show that there were plenty of years after Miami joined the Big East (1991, according to the league website) when there was no Big East team to be found (see asterisks -- I included the BCS/Bowl Alliance years, because I wasn't sure when that era started).

Jan. 4, 2005 Southern California 55, Oklahoma 19 **

Jan. 1, 2004 Miami, Fla. 16, Florida State 14

Jan. 2, 2003 Southern California 38, Iowa 17 **

Jan. 2, 2002 Florida 56, Maryland 23 **

Jan. 3, 2001 Oklahoma 13, Florida State 2 **

Jan. 2, 2000 Michigan 35, Alabama 34, OT **

Jan. 2, 1999 Florida 31, Syracuse 10

Jan. 2, 1998 Nebraska 42, Tennessee 17 **

Dec. 31, 1996 Nebraska 41, Virginia Tech 21

Jan. 1, 1996 Florida State 31, Notre Dame 26 **

Jan. 1, 1995 Nebraska 24, Miami, Fla. 17

Jan. 1, 1994 Florida State 18, Nebraska 16 **

Jan. 1, 1993 Florida State 27, Nebraska 14 **

Jan. 1, 1992 Miami, Fla. 22, Nebraska 0

Jan. 1, 1991 Colorado 10, Notre Dame 9 **

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