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30 Years Ago Today...


Neon_Matrix

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One of the greatest feats in hockey history occured on February 7th 1976 and it was one which is unlikely to ever be repeated or surpassed. Maple Leafs Captain Darryl Sittler scored 10 points (6 goals, 4 assists) in a 11-4 win over the Boston Bruins. While this holds a greater place in the hearts of Leafs fans, it is still widely respected by all hockey fans. This was one of the most amazing moments in hockey history, and makes me even prouder to sport the colours of the might blue and white, especially during a time when they were a bottom feeding team. I think Howard Berger's article in todays National Post really does a great job of explaining the significance of the game, so here it is below. Mind you, if you go to the web site and scroll down, you can actually watch all 6 of Sittlers goals. So enjoy.

http://www.canada.com/nationalpost/news/sp...a87612d9814&p=1

Howard Berger, National Post

Published: Tuesday, February 07, 2006

TORONTO - In the contexts of time, perspective and uniqueness, the events of 30 years ago tonight at Maple Leaf Gardens radiate with a sense of wonderment equal to any landmark achievement in the history of the National Hockey League.

That the name Darryl Sittler continues to stand alone in the NHL Record Book notation of "Most Points, One Game" is a testament to the dumbfounding nature of his exploits on behalf of the Toronto Maple Leafs, and the increasing odds that his accomplishment may never be equalled. It ranks alongside only a handful of marks -- among thousands -- in the record book that can lay claim to such a likelihood. And it commemorates the hockey career of a simple, yet classy Hall of Famer who never seems to have fully embraced the timeworn significance of his performance.

"What's there to be said that hasn't been said already?" asks Sittler of his 10-point explosion against the Boston Bruins on Feb. 7, 1976. "I suppose it becomes more of an achievement as the years pass, but I don't believe it's my legacy as a player. And I don't think it defines me as the person I am, or the teammate I was.

"That isn't to suggest I'm not proud of the record, or the fact nobody has matched it in 30 years. But, others have made more of a fuss about it than I ever did."

That's probably because Sittler rarely pauses to dwell on the past. His life, like many others, has been a mixture of exultation and sorrow. Now 55, still boyishly handsome and in terrific physical condition, the Maple Leafs' all-time leading scorer is happily re-married, having endured the heartache of losing the mother of his three children to cancer in 2001. Though he never skated for a Stanley Cup champion, Sittler is frequently asked to reflect on an eight-month span in 1976 that made him -- at the time -- the most famous hockey player in the world.

It was a period in his career that included an overtime winning goal for his country in the inaugural Canada Cup tournament and a record-tying five-goal eruption in a playoff game against Philadelphia

But it all began with a six-goal, four-assist effort -- 30 years ago tonight against Boston-- that no one could have fathomed.

"There was nothing about that day or the events leading up to the game that suggested something special would happen," Sittler says. "As I look back, the only thing I remember doing differently was going to Swiss Chalet for lunch. I usually ate steak or pasta for a pre-game meal, but I was running around doing all kinds of errands that afternoon, and I only had time to grab a quick bite of chicken."

It's a anecdote that may prompt thousands of young hockey players reading this to venture out for a bite of their own.

Sittler, playing for a foundering Toronto club, could not be stopped by the hottest team in the NHL during a humiliating 11-4 defeat. Between Dec. 26, 1975 and Feb. 5, 1976, the Bruins -- coached at the time by Don Cherry -- had compiled an almost-perfect 16-1-1 record in 18 games. The Leafs, conversely, were so bad that a late goal by Dave (Tiger) Williams was needed just to tie the horrible Washington Capitals in the game that preceded Sittler's record explosion.

Howard Berger, National Post

Published: Tuesday, February 07, 2006

TORONTO - In the contexts of time, perspective and uniqueness, the events of 30 years ago tonight at Maple Leaf Gardens radiate with a sense of wonderment equal to any landmark achievement in the history of the National Hockey League.

That the name Darryl Sittler continues to stand alone in the NHL Record Book notation of "Most Points, One Game" is a testament to the dumbfounding nature of his exploits on behalf of the Toronto Maple Leafs, and the increasing odds that his accomplishment may never be equalled. It ranks alongside only a handful of marks -- among thousands -- in the record book that can lay claim to such a likelihood. And it commemorates the hockey career of a simple, yet classy Hall of Famer who never seems to have fully embraced the timeworn significance of his performance.

"What's there to be said that hasn't been said already?" asks Sittler of his 10-point explosion against the Boston Bruins on Feb. 7, 1976. "I suppose it becomes more of an achievement as the years pass, but I don't believe it's my legacy as a player. And I don't think it defines me as the person I am, or the teammate I was.

"That isn't to suggest I'm not proud of the record, or the fact nobody has matched it in 30 years. But, others have made more of a fuss about it than I ever did."

That's probably because Sittler rarely pauses to dwell on the past. His life, like many others, has been a mixture of exultation and sorrow. Now 55, still boyishly handsome and in terrific physical condition, the Maple Leafs' all-time leading scorer is happily re-married, having endured the heartache of losing the mother of his three children to cancer in 2001. Though he never skated for a Stanley Cup champion, Sittler is frequently asked to reflect on an eight-month span in 1976 that made him -- at the time -- the most famous hockey player in the world.

It was a period in his career that included an overtime winning goal for his country in the inaugural Canada Cup tournament and a record-tying five-goal eruption in a playoff game against Philadelphia

But it all began with a six-goal, four-assist effort -- 30 years ago tonight against Boston-- that no one could have fathomed.

"There was nothing about that day or the events leading up to the game that suggested something special would happen," Sittler says. "As I look back, the only thing I remember doing differently was going to Swiss Chalet for lunch. I usually ate steak or pasta for a pre-game meal, but I was running around doing all kinds of errands that afternoon, and I only had time to grab a quick bite of chicken."

It's a anecdote that may prompt thousands of young hockey players reading this to venture out for a bite of their own.

Sittler, playing for a foundering Toronto club, could not be stopped by the hottest team in the NHL during a humiliating 11-4 defeat. Between Dec. 26, 1975 and Feb. 5, 1976, the Bruins -- coached at the time by Don Cherry -- had compiled an almost-perfect 16-1-1 record in 18 games. The Leafs, conversely, were so bad that a late goal by Dave (Tiger) Williams was needed just to tie the horrible Washington Capitals in the game that preceded Sittler's record explosion.

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Ok I'm not trying to be anti-Leaf here. Sittler was a great player without a doubt, but it's not like he scored 10 points on a great goalie.

Dave Reece NHL Career Stats

It's not like he scored them against Gerry Cheevers or Gilles Gilbert.

No...I could have sworn he was Patrick Roy...

If you read the article it says he was a back up goalie who was playing due to their regular backup being injured and Cheevers being out of shape and not yet game ready. We know the goalie was bad, but who cares, I'm sure if this was by any team not the Leafs you wouldnt care, so just be proud that a player, who happened to be playing for the Leafs, achieved such an accomplishment never before seen in the game of hockey and unlikely to be seen again.

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