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Why 'Torino'?


nym1231

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I have read in several news stories on the subject that NBC Sports president Dick Ebersol went to the city beforehand and loved the way the locals said "Torino" so much that he mandated the use of it for his network's coverage.

Other print and broadcast outlets have different ways of dealing with it. The IOC is officially going with "Torino 2006," so the CBC, for example, uses "Torino" when referring to the Games themselves, but if they're referring to the city ? i.e., in one of their little colour pieces about the city's history, or describing the location of a certain venue relative to the city ? they use "Turin."

I believe it was AP that has stuck with "Turin" in all instances, but other print sources have been flipping between the two. I figure, though, as long as one particular outlet stays consistent throughout its coverage, that's fine.

EDIT: Here's one of the stories on the subject from AP: Bryan-College Station Eagle

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Turin is in French, while Torino is both English and Italian.

I'm almost positive Torino is not English. It's italian. It's the same as saying that Firenze (Florence), Venezia (Venice) or Roma is accepted in English. They are the italian names of the italian cities.

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Why is it that for these Olympics, it is being advertised that the Olympics are in "Torino", not not "Turin"?

In no other Olympics have Americans referred to a foreign host-ccity in its own language.

Wait until 2010. :D

?I was just swept away with how that sounded: Torino,? says Dick Ebersol, chairman of NBC Universal Sports and the chief honcho of NBC Olympics coverage.

?It just rolls off your mouth,? he says. ?It talks about a wonderful part of the world. It has a

romanticism to it. And I just thought that that was a wonderful way to name these games.?

NBC paid $613 million to broadcast 418 hours of the Olympics on the six NBC networks ? broadcast and on cable. But does that give it the right to name these games?

Some didn?t think so.

?One or two of the longtime Olympic experts that work for us looked at me with their eyes crossed,? Ebersol said. ?But other people responded rather well. And so I decided to go ahead and call them the Torino Games. And I noticed that quite a few other people, including USA Today and the Connecticut papers and so forth have picked it up and quite a few others.

?And,? he added, ?the people in Torino call it ?Torino.?

And that?s meant a lot to the people there, says David Neal, executive producer of the Olympics broadcast. He recalls when a former mayor of Turin (or Torino) was told four years ago NBC would be going with the Italian rather than the Anglicized version of the city name, ?literally, there were tears of joy coming down the face of the former mayor.

?So the fact that American television was going to go with the local pronunciation, it had that sort of an impact,? Neal said

Bob Costas, host of the upcoming games, just cracked a joke: ?We?re very much looking forward to our feature on the Shroud of Torino.?

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I can't wait until the Olympics are back in the city of Munich, or as Dick Ebersol will call it, in German, München.  How beautiful.  :P

I can't wait until the Beijing Olympics will be called the Peking Olympics. :D

Did anyone else get a sudden and intense craving for duck just now? ^_^

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I can't wait until the Olympics are back in the city of Munich, or as Dick Ebersol will call it, in German, München.  How beautiful.  :P

I can't wait until the Beijing Olympics will be called the Peking Olympics. :D

Did anyone else get a sudden and intense craving for duck just now? ^_^

Yes. But isn't Peking actually the anglicized version of Beijing, meaning we've already started using the Chinese name?

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I can't wait until the Olympics are back in the city of Munich, or as Dick Ebersol will call it, in German, München.  How beautiful.  :P

I can't wait until the Beijing Olympics will be called the Peking Olympics. :D

Did anyone else get a sudden and intense craving for duck just now? ^_^

Yes. But isn't Peking actually the anglicized version of Beijing, meaning we've already started using the Chinese name?

Peking = pre 1980's

Peiping = for about a week in the 80's

Beijing = since the late 80's

and for the Olympics...

Ling Ling!

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Why is it that for these Olympics, it is being advertised that the Olympics are in "Torino", not not "Turin"?

In no other Olympics have Americans referred to a foreign host-ccity in its own language.

Wait until 2010. :D

What about 1988?

Did anyone else get a sudden and intense craving for duck just now? ^_^

mmmm........ Peking Duck......

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Turin is in French, while Torino is both English and Italian.

As simple as that.

Nope. Turin is English, while Torino is Italian.

If Torino is English, we would refer to the Shroud of Torino. But we don't.

It's just like Roma is Italian while Rome is English.

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Yes. But isn't Peking actually the anglicized version of Beijing, meaning we've already started using the Chinese name?

I think Peking was the old Imeperial name of China in the days of the Royal Family, Beijin is the Communist name after Mao took over the country.

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In all seriousness, why the heck can't we just call a city what it is? I mean, is it that hard to say "Torino," "Firenze," "Venezia," "Roma," "Napoli," "Wein," etc.? I can understand stuff like "Mexico City" instead of "Cuidad de Mexico," but seriously, you'd think in the year 2006 that a globalized society could pick a name.

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This is kind of off topic. But, I've always wondered this...whenever I watch the Olympics. Why is it that all the signs around the courses and everything are in English?

English and French are the offical languages of the Olympics.

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English and French are the offical languages of the Olympics.

To comment on that...

French was always the sole official language of the Olympics. It wasn't until the past few years that English became the second co-official language.

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English and French are the offical languages of the Olympics.

To comment on that...

French was always the sole official language of the Olympics. It wasn't until the past few years that English became the second co-official language.

Wrong.

English and French have always been the offical languages of the Olympic Movement.

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English and French are the offical languages of the Olympics.

To comment on that...

French was always the sole official language of the Olympics. It wasn't until the past few years that English became the second co-official language.

Wrong.

English and French have always been the offical languages of the Olympic Movement.

So I guess one of the commentators for the Olympics made a bit of a mistake B)

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