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Neon_Matrix

The Penguins Close To Officially Moving?

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i would hate to see the penguins move i think a team that has won a championship shouldnt move they have history and should stay there. Moving to Kansas City would suck, move a team to Portland or winnipeg cities that love hockey and want a team bad.

oh yeah...KC doesn't want Hockey bad. <_<

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i would hate to see the penguins move i think a team that has won a championship shouldnt move they have history and should stay there. Moving to Kansas City would suck, move a team to Portland or winnipeg cities that love hockey and want a team bad.

Who the (New Jersey) Devil(s) says Portland wants a team bad?

Heck, move the Pens to either Hartford (Look ma, no realignment!) or Houston (US' 4th largest city...and most importantly, close enough for me to do some Crosby watching... :P)

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Ladies and gentlemen here are your HARTFORD PENGUINS!

(cue Brass Bonanza)

I can't dream? :P

If that happens, they should sign Ron Francis for a day and tie up some Penguins/Whalers/Hurricanes history all in one person.

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Its obvious what i think about all this.

Dont get me wrong, i love the Steelers and Pirates, but the Penguins have always been my absolute favorite. I have had many joys and displeaesures with this team. When Lemieux returned thats when i started to follow hockey as a sport. I saw the Pens get all the way to the conference series and lose. I always hoped theyd return, but, after that, they started losing all the time. Now, they finally have the chance to become a glorious team again, and Pittsburgh most likely has to be forced to see them move. Nobody in this city wants to see them go, especially now. The city has had rallies for where thousands of fans have reported to show their support for the Isle of Capris and the Pittsburgh First comittee. This plan isnt just to add a new arena and casio, its going to revitalize the entire lower hill district area of Pittsburgh {which is nothing but run-down and abandoned apartments and shops}. If something that will do great for the whole city with NO TAXES and to provide hundreds of jobs and much more housing & buisness isnt enough to convince government officials to choose this plan, i dont know what will. It would be a dark day for the city, county, western half of the state, if/when the pens move.

http://www.pittsburghfirst.com/actions.aspx

Desperate times call for desperate measures.

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To be brutally honest, if you're expecting gambling to revitalize a rundown area, you're in for a rude shock. I mean, look at us, we're crawling with casinos and even before Katrina/Rita a budget crisis was looming for Louisiana, as revenues from the casinos were falling significantly below projected numbers. I haven't even begun to talk about the socioeconomic problems related to casinos in an urban area. You are right about something though, desperate times call for desperate measures.

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Who the (New Jersey) Devil(s) says Portland wants a team bad?

Portland might not be making a big bid for the penguins but its a great hockey city I know people from there who love hockey and would love a nhl team. there whl team the winter hawks get great attendance and are big enough for a nhl city plus the nhl has to many teams in the east.

i would hate to see the penguins move i think a team that has won a championship shouldnt move they have history and should stay there. Moving to Kansas City would suck, move a team to Portland or winnipeg cities that love hockey and want a team bad. 

oh yeah...KC doesn't want Hockey bad <_< .

i've just never heard of Kansas city being a hardcore hockey city and if the penguins are going to move might as well be to a hardcore hockey city like winninpeg, portland and maybe even hartford. The nhl already has enough teams in cities where people could care less about hockey. but if you explain to me that kansas is a good hockey city maybe my opinon will change.

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Penguins is sucha good nickname for hockey it will work in any city. After all there are no Penguins in Pittsburgh either.

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Son, in this day and age "good hockey city" doesn't carry as much weight as "city with brand new arena and interested owner".

Portland can't provide an interested owner, so they're out.

Hartford is currently lacking in the "brand new arena with luxury boxes" department.

Winnipeg needs to demonstrate that they have good owners lined up, and that they can overcome playing in a small arena.

Since you were asking though, Kansas City has been home to numerous minor league hockey franchises, the most famous being the old Kansas City Blades of the IHL.

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Portland might not be making a big bid for the penguins but its a great hockey city I know people from there who love hockey and would love a nhl team.  there whl team the winter hawks get great attendance and are big enough for a nhl city plus the nhl has to many teams in the east.

Well, I know I'd love a hockey team back in Lafayette, and I'm about as hardcore fan as you can find in the nether regions of Louisiana, but that doesn't mean we deserve one.

Besides, too many teams in the east? I suppose you've never looked at the distribution of population in the United States... <_<

i've just never heard of Kansas city being a hardcore hockey city and if the penguins are going to move might as well be to a hardcore hockey city like winninpeg, portland and maybe even hartford.  The nhl already has enough teams in cities where people could care less about hockey. but if you explain to me that kansas is a good hockey city maybe my opinon will change.

I'm one of the few people who believe in the NHL's expansion philosophy. You put teams in new markets to create new fans. You already have rabid fans in Winnipeg and Hartford without teams. You will gather few if any new fans in comparison to the untapped market in places like Kansas City or Houston (my top 2 places I'd love to see them go if they have to move)

As for towns that don't care about hockey, check out the attendance figures. By your reasoning, I guess it was a mistake to expand to Chicago or Long Island back in the day... :rolleyes:

http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/attendance?year=2006

As for Kansas City and hockey...

http://home.att.net/~kchockey/

Kansas City has a rather long history of ice hockey, but unfortunately it's been saddled with some pretty poor squads. a team on the rise with good ownership like the Pens would have in KC would fit a lot better than a traditional expansion team.

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IF the move does happen,and i brought this up before btw,i assume that there gonna some form of re-alignment,then qustion is who is goona be force to the Eastern Conference?

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IF the move does happen,and i brought this up before btw,i assume that there gonna some form of re-alignment,then qustion is who is goona be force to the Eastern Conference?

I would guess either Nashville or Columbus

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Detroit would move to the east if they want to - the NHL has already told the wings that they have priority if they need to balance the league - i assume the wings would move to the northeast with the canadian teams and boston and the sabers would move into the atlantic division with the rest of the new york/penn/nj teams

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I, for one, having been a longtime hockey-Nords-Habs fans, hate to see the Penguins leave Pittsburgh. It's just that the team has fallen on hard times, despite their 2 Stanley Cup Titles after the turn of the decade.

Then again maybe a move may do them good.

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Columbus is further east than Detroit. Columbus is only a few hours west of Pittsburgh. Therefore, the Jackets are the logical choice to fill the spot left if the Pens move.

Unfortunately, this probably means that KC takes Columbus's spot in the Central, so Minnesota is still stuck in the Northwest, and the old Norris still isn't quite revived.

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Detroit would move to the east if they want to - the NHL has already told the wings that they have priority if they need to balance the league - i assume the wings would move to the northeast with the canadian teams and boston and the sabers would move into the atlantic division with the rest of the new york/penn/nj teams

Yah,but it would make more logistical sense to send Nashville to the Southeast division,which bumps Washington to the Atlantic,btw that would put Minnesota in the Central in they in up in Houston,If they set shop in KC,then KC would be in the Central.Mark my words on that one. if it comes down like that.

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I for one do not want to see the red wings in the east. I would feel bad for Chicago (they are having a rough time but some day they'll owner will kick the bucket), and places like minnesota and colorado. If anything, I wouldn't mind seeing the leafs in west again, although I might be in the minority. I just loved the rivalries we had with chicago, detroit, st louis and even the kings. Especially in the playoffs. Not to sound cocky, but since the leafs left the west it has never been the same for me.

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Columbus is further east than Detroit. Columbus is only a few hours west of Pittsburgh. Therefore, the Jackets are the logical choice to fill the spot left if the Pens move.

True, it makes the most sense, but I still think Detroit would get shifted over first... they've been trying to move (from what i've heard) to the east for a few seasons now

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KansasCity.gif

This is looking more and more likely.

A Toronto commercial real estate magnate who once tried to bring an NBA team to the city has surfaced as a potential bidder for the NHL's Pittsburgh Penguins, and plans to move the franchise to Kansas City if an agreement for a new hockey rink in Pittsburgh isn't completed.

David Fingold and his son Sam have already reviewed the Penguins' financial books and are poised to make a bid to buy the struggling team, the Star has learned.

The elder Fingold, who has spearheaded a tony real estate development called The Chedington on Bayview Ave., was part of a group alongside basketball hall of famer Wilt Chamberlain that mounted a failed attempt in 1988 to bring an expansion basketball team to Toronto.

As the NHL moves into the playoff mode, after the first season following the league's season-long lockout, investment bankers who specialize in the pro sports business say that, strong attendance figures and TV ratings aside, at least a half-dozen franchises are up for sale.

While the owners of teams such as the Atlanta Thrashers, Nashville Predators and Phoenix Coyotes would certainly entertain buyout offers, the Penguins may present the most compelling package for interested parties.

The Penguins joined the NHL as an expansion franchise in 1967 and, thanks to the emergence of Mario Lemieux as a star player in the mid-1980s, won back-to-back Stanley Cup championships in 1990-91 and 1991-92. Even though the team struggled in subsequent seasons ? in October, 1998, the Penguins franchise declared bankruptcy for the second time ? the club has a promising future thanks to Sidney Crosby and other coveted young prospects.

"What we would get with the Penguins would be an affordable franchise and a portable one," Sam Fingold said in an interview. "We think this could be a great investment."

Neither Fingold would say whether their family has other financial partners.

"We'd be doing this mostly with family money," Sam Fingold said.

One sports investment banker said that prospective bidders like the Fingolds are vexed about what to offer for the Penguins, who are now owned by Lemieux. The former star player acquired the team because he was one of its biggest creditors when it filed for bankruptcy protection.

"If you're buying the team to keep it in Pittsburgh, you're probably looking at paying $120-$130 million (all figures U.S.)," the banker said. "But if you're buying them to move them to a different city, where you're definitely going to be in a better building with a better lease, maybe you're looking at closer to $150 million."

The Penguins' future in Pittsburgh hinges on which company is awarded a slot-gaming licence by the state government.

The Penguins have partnered with Isle of Capri Casinos Inc., one of the world's biggest operators of riverboat and dockside casinos that's one of the companies pursuing a licence. The Biloxi, Miss., gaming company wants to build a $250 million casino replete with 3,000 slot machines and has also pledged to pay $290 million toward a new arena for the Penguins, who currently play in the NHL's oldest rink, 45-year-old Mellon Arena.

The Penguins can leave Pittsburgh in June, 2007, when their current lease expires.

Isle of Capri has already secured financing for the arena and casino from Toronto's CIBC World Markets, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette has reported. But several other groups are also pursuing the slots licence and don't have pacts with the Penguins. The state Gaming Control Board is expected to issue the licence later this year or in early 2007.

If one of the Isle of Capri's competitors wins the license, that may free up the team to move to a more attractive market such as Kansas City, Sam Fingold said.

Fingold confirmed that he and his father would consider moving the club to Kansas City.

Kansas City hasn't had an NHL team since the Scouts, an expansion franchise, moved to Denver in 1976 to become the Colorado Rockies.

But Kansas City has recently completed construction on the new 18,500-seat Sprint Center, a $276 million arena that needs a tenant like an NHL team to pay down its debt.

http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentSe...93064&t=TS_Home

It would suck to see the Penguins move...but I mean they may be forced to. I'm sure after a few years and when the team improves its on ice product the people of Pittsburgh will want a team back.

Okay, here is my argument. I am not trying to put down the city of Kansas City, because they are a worthy sports town. But, c'mon, Missouri already has the NHL; the Blues. Is it really necessary for another Missouri hockey team? They had the Scouts and that didn't work out. Plus, they had a minor league hockey team there about a year ago named the Outlaws in the UHL. They barely got any support from the fans. I think the NHL can do better on searching for locations for the NHL. Like I said, Kansas City is a great town, but they've had their shot. Why doesn't the NHL just give some other locations a shot at. They're are plenty out there that are suitable for hockey. If the Penguins move and they most likely will. I would really hate to see them in Kansas City.

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Go Jets Go! The NHL needs to put a team back in an established hockey city. You know, one with a rich history. Winnipeg got screwed over by the NHL back then, as did Minnesota. They got their team back, maybe now is the time we do too.

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KansasCity.gif

This is looking more and more likely.

A Toronto commercial real estate magnate who once tried to bring an NBA team to the city has surfaced as a potential bidder for the NHL's Pittsburgh Penguins, and plans to move the franchise to Kansas City if an agreement for a new hockey rink in Pittsburgh isn't completed.

David Fingold and his son Sam have already reviewed the Penguins' financial books and are poised to make a bid to buy the struggling team, the Star has learned.

The elder Fingold, who has spearheaded a tony real estate development called The Chedington on Bayview Ave., was part of a group alongside basketball hall of famer Wilt Chamberlain that mounted a failed attempt in 1988 to bring an expansion basketball team to Toronto.

As the NHL moves into the playoff mode, after the first season following the league's season-long lockout, investment bankers who specialize in the pro sports business say that, strong attendance figures and TV ratings aside, at least a half-dozen franchises are up for sale.

While the owners of teams such as the Atlanta Thrashers, Nashville Predators and Phoenix Coyotes would certainly entertain buyout offers, the Penguins may present the most compelling package for interested parties.

The Penguins joined the NHL as an expansion franchise in 1967 and, thanks to the emergence of Mario Lemieux as a star player in the mid-1980s, won back-to-back Stanley Cup championships in 1990-91 and 1991-92. Even though the team struggled in subsequent seasons ? in October, 1998, the Penguins franchise declared bankruptcy for the second time ? the club has a promising future thanks to Sidney Crosby and other coveted young prospects.

"What we would get with the Penguins would be an affordable franchise and a portable one," Sam Fingold said in an interview. "We think this could be a great investment."

Neither Fingold would say whether their family has other financial partners.

"We'd be doing this mostly with family money," Sam Fingold said.

One sports investment banker said that prospective bidders like the Fingolds are vexed about what to offer for the Penguins, who are now owned by Lemieux. The former star player acquired the team because he was one of its biggest creditors when it filed for bankruptcy protection.

"If you're buying the team to keep it in Pittsburgh, you're probably looking at paying $120-$130 million (all figures U.S.)," the banker said. "But if you're buying them to move them to a different city, where you're definitely going to be in a better building with a better lease, maybe you're looking at closer to $150 million."

The Penguins' future in Pittsburgh hinges on which company is awarded a slot-gaming licence by the state government.

The Penguins have partnered with Isle of Capri Casinos Inc., one of the world's biggest operators of riverboat and dockside casinos that's one of the companies pursuing a licence. The Biloxi, Miss., gaming company wants to build a $250 million casino replete with 3,000 slot machines and has also pledged to pay $290 million toward a new arena for the Penguins, who currently play in the NHL's oldest rink, 45-year-old Mellon Arena.

The Penguins can leave Pittsburgh in June, 2007, when their current lease expires.

Isle of Capri has already secured financing for the arena and casino from Toronto's CIBC World Markets, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette has reported. But several other groups are also pursuing the slots licence and don't have pacts with the Penguins. The state Gaming Control Board is expected to issue the licence later this year or in early 2007.

If one of the Isle of Capri's competitors wins the license, that may free up the team to move to a more attractive market such as Kansas City, Sam Fingold said.

Fingold confirmed that he and his father would consider moving the club to Kansas City.

Kansas City hasn't had an NHL team since the Scouts, an expansion franchise, moved to Denver in 1976 to become the Colorado Rockies.

But Kansas City has recently completed construction on the new 18,500-seat Sprint Center, a $276 million arena that needs a tenant like an NHL team to pay down its debt.

http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentSe...93064&t=TS_Home

It would suck to see the Penguins move...but I mean they may be forced to. I'm sure after a few years and when the team improves its on ice product the people of Pittsburgh will want a team back.

Okay, here is my argument. I am not trying to put down the city of Kansas City, because they are a worthy sports town. But, c'mon, Missouri already has the NHL; the Blues. Is it really necessary for another Missouri hockey team? They had the Scouts and that didn't work out. Plus, they had a minor league hockey team there about a year ago named the Outlaws in the UHL. They barely got any support from the fans. I think the NHL can do better on searching for locations for the NHL. Like I said, Kansas City is a great town, but they've had their shot. Why doesn't the NHL just give some other locations a shot at. They're are plenty out there that are suitable for hockey. If the Penguins move and they most likely will. I would really hate to see them in Kansas City.

Kansas City is I think a good 3 hour drive from St. Louis. It is plenty far from St. Louis and other teams.

Second, the NHL has gone back to markets that it once left. Denver, Atlanta, and Minnesota all got second chances. Why not KC?

As for the UHL team you have to remember that KC is mpstly a major league city. Meaning they have teams on the top level of sports. In KC's case long time teams in the Cheifs and Royals (all jokes about the Royals aside). Not many people in an area with top level pro sports teams are going to go watch a 2nd or 3rd tier minor league team. If the NHL moved in it would be the only top level winter sports team their and would probably recieve great support. Especially if a team like the Penguins who would be on an up swing moved their. It would be a lot like the Avs where the city gets an already good team.

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