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Logo Program


Denver#1

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Although you can create it in anything theorectically, I personally think any and all logos should be created in Illustrator. It is without a doubt the most important tool to use to design logos in (freehand is good as well).

You want a vector based program, because say if you were to create the greatest logo ever in photoshop, now you are stuck with the question of "Is this the exact resolution and size I need?", "What if they need this for a billboard?", "What if I have all of these gradients on it, and it needs to be a flat one color logo for a t-shirt or some other application of the logo?".

Logos should usually be created so it it works in black and white. Any logo you make should be able to work in it's most simplest form. Plus (as I stated before) if you start and end in Illustrator, they can make it as big as they want or as small as they want. If they have changes, they are easier to make, especially if you have a few happy accidents that you may not be sure that you can recreate again.

For whatever reason, too many people only know photoshop because it is the flashier program, but if you really want to create graphics from scratch for logos, websites or whatever, I recommmend starting in Illustrator first, it allows you to be more organic with your shapes and ideas.

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Although you can create it in anything theorectically, I personally think any and all logos should be created in Illustrator. It is without a doubt the most important tool to use to design logos in (freehand is good as well).

You want a vector based program, because say if you were to create the greatest logo ever in photoshop, now you are stuck with the question of "Is this the exact resolution and size I need?", "What if they need this for a billboard?", "What if I have all of these gradients on it, and it needs to be a flat one color logo for a t-shirt or some other application of the logo?".

Logos should usually be created so it it works in black and white. Any logo you make should be able to work in it's most simplest form. Plus (as I stated before) if you start and end in Illustrator, they can make it as big as they want or as small as they want. If they have changes, they are easier to make, especially if you have a few happy accidents that you may not be sure that you can recreate again.

For whatever reason, too many people only know photoshop because it is the flashier program, but if you really want to create graphics from scratch for logos, websites or whatever, I recommmend starting in Illustrator first, it allows you to be more organic with your shapes and ideas.

Agreed 100%.

I will, however, say this: used the right way, photoshop can be a good aid to illustrator. What I mean is this (and I've done it): one can take a picture of something they've done, such as a pencil sketch or something, doctor it up in photoshop, or just play around with a bunch of ideas or what now and doctor those up, and then export that into illustrator and then become best friends with the pen tool (ah yes...the famous pen tool.) It is also possible to File/Place a picture into an Illustrator document and pen-tool trace it as well. (CS2 actually has a "live-trace" feature...that is SO MUCH EASIER!!!)

I agree though (and this has been beat over my head a million and one times in my classes), the best logos work in black and white as well as color (think Houston Texans, Dallas Cowboys, Detroit Red wings, or most airline and corporate logos).

Of course, as most anyone with even a stitch of design talent knows, the BEST place to start is with a pencil and a piece of paper.

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In all fairness, though - if anyone has to ask if there are any programs that can create logos, running right out to buy Illustrator probably isn't in their best interest.

There's no harm in starting small, with just about any program you can find. The common thread among the best designers on this board isn't a program - it's an eye for design.

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In all fairness, though - if anyone has to ask if there are any programs that can create logos, running right out to buy Illustrator probably isn't in their best interest.

There's no harm in starting small, with just about any program you can find. The common thread among the best designers on this board isn't a program - it's an eye for design.

In all fairness, though - if anyone has to ask if there are any programs that can create logos, running right out to buy Illustrator probably isn't in their best interest.

There's no harm in starting small, with just about any program you can find.  The common thread among the best designers on this board isn't a program - it's an eye for design.

Very true. Very, very true. I know I started out with the smallest program one can find--and I found it right at Eckerd's.

That would be a 24-pack of Crayola Color Pencils. And a bunch of filler looseleaf.

(Did I mention at one time I also used a Etch-and-Sketch to develop ideas???)

Plus, Illustrator (as I found out during this past term of classes) takes a while to learn and and even longer to get halfway decent at. (DASTARD PEN TOOL!!! :P ) It just takes practice and commitment. But I think that's true with just about any software program. Or anything, really, even sketching and drawing. I mean, after all, nobody can exactly come out the womb and create a Rembrandt portrati. True, some people are born with the talent, but, like most other things, it's got to be realized first, then developed.

All good things take time. (I say that preaching to myself...)

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In all fairness, though - if anyone has to ask if there are any programs that can create logos, running right out to buy Illustrator probably isn't in their best interest.

There's no harm in starting small, with just about any program you can find. The common thread among the best designers on this board isn't a program - it's an eye for design.

who said anything about buying?!?! :)

(Just kidding, as I own every single thing on my computer)

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