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NFL China Bowl logo on the field


Slickster

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Check it out...the NFL China Bowl logo is on the 25-yard lines at Gillette Stadium tonight for their home opener against the Broncos.

Also, peep the Patriots.com endzone banners written in English and Mandarin. (CCTV is showing the Sunday Night Football schedule live all season long.)

The China Bowl will be held on 08.08.2007 in Beijing and will pit the Patriots against the Seahawks at Workers Stadium. Game will be broadcast at 8:30 am EST on that date.

The game was confirmed today by the NFL offices.

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Cool idea, but does it necessitate a field logo? I know it's a primetime national game, and the NFL wants to publicize it, but come on: it's damn preseason game.

On a side note, I know some Pats players are NOT looking forward to this. I remember backn in August, when the idea of the game first speculated, Mike Vrabel said something to the effect that it throws their schedule out of loop. Between leaving from Boston to landing in Seattle, training there a few days, then hopping a plane to China, the players aren't so thrilled about it.

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I wonder who the NFL's Chinese translators are. They have an inconsistency in Chinese between the "Bowl" used in China Bowl and "Bowl" used in the "Super Bowl."

For the Super Bowl, the Chinese word is 超级杯, with 超级 ("chaoji") meaning "super," and 杯 ("bei"), which literally means "cup," being the translation of bowl. The word 杯 "bei" has become the accepted word in Chinese for any sports trophy, as it also appears in the word for World Cup, or 世界杯 ("shi jie bei"), literally "world cup."

China Bowl, on the other hand, has been rendered here as 中国碗 ("zhongguo wan"), where 中国 ("zhongguo") means "China," and 碗 ("wan") means "bowl." This is the same bowl in rice bowl, 饭碗, or the Communist word iron rice bowl, 铁饭碗. By itself, there's no problem with this translation, but in conjunction with the existing word in Chinese for Super Bowl, this translation will make no sense to Chinese because they have never seen the word 碗 ("wan") or "bowl" used in the sense of a sporting event, while 杯 ("bei") or "cup" is an accepted usage.

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Between leaving from Boston to landing in Seattle, training there a few days, then hopping a plane to China, the players aren't so thrilled about it.

Training there a few days? The Patriots will also be playing the Seahawks at Qwest Field on August 2nd in the pre-season opener for both teams. Then, both teams fly to Beijing... and play each other again on August 8th in "NFL China Bowl".

Apparently, with two you get egg-roll.

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Between leaving from Boston to landing in Seattle, training there a few days, then hopping a plane to China, the players aren't so thrilled about it.

Training there a few days? The Patriots will also be playing the Seahawks at Qwest Field on August 2nd in the pre-season opener for both teams. Then, both teams fly to Beijing... and play each other again on August 8th in "NFL China Bowl".

Apparently, with two you get egg-roll.

That's the problem with Chinese exhibition games -- six days later you want more.

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dude, i think its a decent idea...but Patriots Brady "Chineese" jerseys?? the Pats are taking this to the extreme!

Not really. Let's think about this, when you see "QB-14" written down on a piece of paper you may think of Tom Brady, but in China that's read as "Q Hot Braised Chicken."

All in good fun, my friends. All in good fun.

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dude, i think its a decent idea...but Patriots Brady "Chineese" jerseys?? the Pats are taking this to the extreme!

Not really. Let's think about this, when you see "QB-14" written down on a piece of paper you may think of Tom Brady, but in China that's read as "Q Hot Braised Chicken."

All in good fun, my friends. All in good fun.

I'm sorry guys.... but that was funny.

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dude, i think its a decent idea...but Patriots Brady "Chineese" jerseys?? the Pats are taking this to the extreme!

Not really. Let's think about this, when you see "QB-14" written down on a piece of paper you may think of Tom Brady, but in China that's read as "Q Hot Braised Chicken."

Actually QB-12 makes me think of Brady, not QB-14...

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I sure could go for a China Bowl right now... with chicken and rice. Mmmmm.

For some reason I can picture KFC coming out with a "China Bowl" on their menu

"We start with a generous serving of chicken fried rice, layered with fried wontons and loaded with bite-sized pieces of the Colonels's crispy chicken. Then we drizzle it all with the General's spicey sauce and top it off with a shredded egg roll blend. It's all your favorite flavors coming together."

:puke:

I wonder if I shouldn't just pass this along to them, somebody might actually eat it.

KFC Bowls

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Check it out...the NFL China Bowl logo is on the 25-yard lines at Gillette Stadium tonight for their home opener against the Broncos.

I thought I'd throw in the fact that this game wasn't the Pats home opener, considering they played week 1 against the Bills at home.

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I wonder who the NFL's Chinese translators are.  They have an inconsistency in Chinese between the "Bowl" used in China Bowl and "Bowl" used in the "Super Bowl."

For the Super Bowl, the Chinese word is 超级杯, with 超级 ("chaoji") meaning "super," and 杯 ("bei"), which literally means "cup," being the translation of bowl.  The word 杯 "bei" has become the accepted word in Chinese for any sports trophy, as it also appears in the word for World Cup, or 世界杯 ("shi jie bei"), literally "world cup."

China Bowl, on the other hand, has been rendered here as 中国碗 ("zhongguo wan"), where 中国 ("zhongguo") means "China," and 碗 ("wan") means "bowl."  This is the same bowl in rice bowl, 饭碗, or the Communist word iron rice bowl, 铁饭碗.  By itself, there's no problem with this translation, but in conjunction with the existing word in Chinese for Super Bowl, this translation will make no sense to Chinese because they have never seen the word 碗 ("wan") or "bowl" used in the sense of a sporting event, while 杯 ("bei") or "cup" is an accepted usage.

Do you laugh at people who get tatoos with Chinese characters that say things in a different way than was probably intended? I've heard a million rumors about how many people are walking around with Chinese and Japanese characters that say some messed up things and they don't even realize it.

Imagine going in to a tatoo shop looking for Chinese characters that say "Peace and love" and you come out with "I rape baby goats" or something.

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Do you laugh at people who get tatoos with Chinese characters that say things in a different way than was probably intended? I've heard a million rumors about how many people are walking around with Chinese and Japanese characters that say some messed up things and they don't even realize it.

Imagine going in to a tatoo shop looking for Chinese characters that say "Peace and love" and you come out with "I rape baby goats" or something.

Yeah, I've seen some pretty wierd uses of Chinese characters in tatoos. The most common mistake is to have the characters upside-down. (Who knows, maybe the tatooee wanted the tatoo so it was right-side up when he looks at it!) Of course, sometimes I seen people with relatively strange characters tatooed on, but nothing specific comes to mind right now.

I'm not a native speaker of Chinese, but my wife is, and she thinks the translation of China Bowl is embarassingly terrible (i.e., translated by someone using the Google translation tool). She was speechless about the Brady 十二 jersey, but I guess neither she nor other Chinese are the target market for that.

Anyway, as much as I'd like to see American football succeed in China, I don't think there's much of a hope for the NFL there. Right now, football is as much a part of the Chinese sports fans conscious as are baseball and ice hockey. Think cricket in the United States. Basically, people have heard of sports called football (literally "olive ball" in Chinese), baseball ("club ball"), and ice hockey ("ice ball"), but no one really knows much about them much less having had a chance to see a game on TV.

China's too worried about trying to find 11 people from their population of 1.5 billion who can play soccer well enough to knock off the formidable likes of Japan, Korea, Saudi Arabia, Iran.

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