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Josh Hancock dies in auto accident

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I'm sorry...he pitched for a baseball team. Is there another legacy I should be aware of?

EDIT: That is to say, I never heard of him until he died. The mourning en masse -- especially after it was revealed he could have easily killed others along the way -- doesn't add up.

And Phil, the "who among us" nonsense completely invalidates what the Internet's all about. We flock to message boards principally so we can judge others while ignoring our own foibles. Don't ruin that for us -- we need it.

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I'm sorry...he pitched for a baseball team. Is there another legacy I should be aware of?

Yes, the storied legacy of every journeyman middle reliever who can barely hang on for two seasons with a team.

Jeez, man, get with the program. Fanatic's already drafting the necessary paperwork to lobby for HOF enshrinement. I hear if he can't get Hancock in, he's willing to settle for the SUV bumper in a Lucite case.

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Screw HOF enshrinement...let's shoot for Sainthood (along with the other drunk, Tony LaRussa).

Phil, excuse me, your High-and-Mightiness?, spare me the revelling in his death speech. No one is revelling in the guys death. It's just that once the facts came to light, the death of Joshua Morgan Hancock (1979-2007) is no longer a tragedy. It's a cautionary tale. Yes, all of us have done stupid things...most of us (except you, of course) will continue to do stupid things, but I'm not going to feel sorry for this idiot (though I DO feel for his family) or a flock of fanboys who claim to be in mourning because some guy on a team they like plowed into a tow truck at 70 miles per hour when he was drunk, possibly high, and certainly not paying attention while driving.

Sorry, guess I'm just a heartless bastard. But I know your God will forgive me for that, so I'm cool.

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I've never said anything about HOF or anything to that extent. It's just stupid on your part to suggest such things.

Every person leaves behind a legacy. Go watch the clips of his sister speak at the memorial yesterday. His teammate. His coach. His scout. His agent. Listen to the emailed responses his minister recieved from fans who he touched.

That's a legacy, and that's his legacy. And for some it's worth remembering.

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THIS is also his legacy. And it's also worth remembering.

Indeed it is, Jigga. Hopefully many will learn from it, but the past shows that's doubtful.

But if just one or two people do (which could be, what, as many as 10 lives) does, well, that's something I suppose.

I'm not in favor of covering this up, saying he wasn't dumb, calling him a saint.

But he was a good person who touched many people in good ways. He also made some bad, dumb mistakes that unfortunatley killed him (but thankfully nobody else). Both things are worth remembering and learning from.

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Phil, excuse me, your High-and-Mightiness?, spare me the revelling in his death speech. ...most of us (except you, of course) will continue to do stupid things

Hooray! Finally, somebody is recognizing my greatness, as well as my exclusive right to High-and-Mightiness? (especially seeing how much the American Democrats have been infringing lately). :rolleyes::)

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I'm sorry to say that I have absolute NO sympathy for drunk drivers. I lost a cousin to a bitch of a drunk driver and IMO there's nothing worth remembering about something like except how not to :censored: up. Hancock chlorinated his own gene pool, good riddance.

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I felt sorry for him, then we find out he was drunk. As others have said that feeling has left me. The feelings for his family and friends is still there though. Basically he made the bed, and sadly now it's his turn to lie in it. I'm just thankful nobody else was injured or killed because of his actions.

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I'm just glad nobody else was killed.

What if God forbid he hit van with a family in it and killed someone.

He was a moron and I have no sympathy at all for him now.

What makes this worse is 5 things.

1. His Manager was arrested for a DUI in Spring Training. Fell Asleep at the wheel yada yada we know the story, but someone who was there should know not to be drinking and driving a month later.

2. He had an accident two days earlier. We dont know the full details of that one but just the idea of being in an accident should have made him more careful.

3. With all the John Corzine news be it there may not be much news out there about it, but showing the dangers of not wearing a seatbelat and he does not wear a seatbelt shows he was asking for trouble.

4. Hes drunk and usinga cell phone, ok its one thing to try and drive home drunk, its another to be on cellphone too, its almost like he had a death wish.

5. Marijuana too, we dont know if he was stoned, but the joint in the car shows he was at least using.

So lets review

He knew the consequences of driving drunk, he was not wearing his seatbelt, talking on a cellphone, and possibly stoned, while driving two days after another accident.

Sorry I have no sympathy for him, and hope this can only serve as a wake up call for other players who think they are bulletproof.

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Sorry I have no sympathy for him, and hope this can only serve as a wake up call for other players who think they are bulletproof.

Just ask Tank....

... Johnson :P

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It is amazing when you think about how many athletes have died from drunk driving and yet no body seems to learn... Some of these atheltes were well respected and a few, even stars. Some who I can name off the top of my head are:

Palle Lindburgh of the Philadelphia Flyers in 1985.

Steve Chiasson of the Carolina Hurricanes in 1999.

Tim Horton in 1974.

I found this very interesting article about drunk drivers in the NHL and it is weird that so many of the names which pop out as to have being charged for DUI is amazing. http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/12-18-2003-48726.asp

When will people learn eh? What will it take for athletes and the public in general to realise that drinking and driving is NOT a good idea? We dont need more deaths from this, both the driver and victims...

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Drinking does cloud your judgment though. I can't tell you how many times I've stopped people who said "but i've only had a couple of drinks..." only to blow over a .10. It also clouds people's judgment in other ways hence your "2 at 10 turning into a 10 at 2."

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It is amazing when you think about how many athletes have died from drunk driving and yet no body seems to learn... Some of these atheltes were well respected and a few, even stars.

And some are worshiped as gods post mortem after driving drunk, for some reason... see Prefontaine, Steve.

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Maybe I'm the wrong one. I didn't think if someone died in the wrong way it makes their life a waste.

One of my very good friends from college died in a drunk driving accident. Again, luckily he did not hurt anyone else (single car accident). I'll never condone his actions. But I'll also never ever say "He got what he deserved," and I can't believe anyone else would say that either.

Guess I'm wrong though. My friend deserved to die. No...sorry...that still doesn't sound right.

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http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/base...n.ap/index.html

A 'meaningful' move

After Hancock death, Cards ban alcohol in clubhouse

Posted: Friday May 4, 2007 6:36PM; Updated: Friday May 4, 2007 7:58PM

According to St. Louis police, Josh Hancock was drunk at the time of his fatal accident on a Missouri interstate last week.

AP

ST. LOUIS (AP) -- The St. Louis Cardinals banned alcohol from the clubhouse on Friday, five days after the alcohol-related fatal accident of pitcher Josh Hancock.

Manager Tony La Russa said general manager Walt Jocketty did not consult players before making the decision before the team's first home game since Hancock's death. La Russa said it was a largely symbolic move since players don't drink much in the clubhouse anyway.

The team also is considering an alcohol ban on the road.

"It's meaningful," La Russa said. "But it's not a significant factor in our clubhouse because our guys don't stay in the clubhouse to drink."

Center fielder Jim Edmonds was unaware of the change when approached by reporters about 21/2 hours before Friday's game against the Houston Astros. He didn't seem to mind, although he didn't believe it was a problem in the clubhouse.

"I didn't know anything about it. But if that's what they want to do, fine with us," said Edmonds, the longest tenured Cardinal who has been with the team since 2000. "They're our bosses, they're the ones who make the big decisions. We just work here."

La Russa didn't think alcohol abuse was a problem on the team in general, noting that many of the players are married with children. The bullpen is an exception.

"Look at our roster," he said. "The game is over, guys go home to their family. So it's a limited scope issue."

The Cardinals were owned for decades by Anheuser Busch Cos. Inc., and their stadium is named after the brewery. The team has traditionally made alcohol available to players after games. Even after Anheuser Busch sold the team to a group of mostly local businessmen in 1996, the practice continued.

Edmonds said Hancock's death was a shock to the system for players, and should be for the public in general also.

"I'd hate to single out our team, because I don't think it's a baseball issue. I think it's an issue all over the place, and hopefully people will be more aware of it because of what happened."

The Astros do not provide alcohol to players in their clubhouse. Manager Phil Garner recalled the Brewers, where he began his managerial career in 1992, banning alcohol that season.

Garner sees that as a reflection of a healthier society in general.

"The drinking as a whole has dropped off significantly in the clubhouse, and from what I see, just generally, in baseball as a whole," Garner said. "I think there was a drinking culture in baseball years ago, and I don't think it's there anymore.

"Guys work to condition themselves and it's a 'round the clock deal."

At Yankee Stadium, manager Joe Torre said he thought individual teams had addressed the issue.

"Obviously it's more of a problem at home than it would be on the road because when you're on the road you're on a bus and you're not driving," Torre said.

Hancock was drunk and talking on his cell phone at the time of his fatal accident early Sunday on Interstate 64 in St. Louis. His sports utility vehicle hit the back of a tow truck parked on the highway to assist a driver from a previous accident.

Hancock's blood-alcohol level was 0.157, nearly twice Missouri's legal limit of 0.08, the medical examiner said.

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La Russa really has the sword of Damocles over his head here, because if he tries to crack down on alcohol, he'll be called a hypocrite, and if he doesn't, he's insensitive and not watching out for his players.

Also, there are birds perched on the sword of Damocles.

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La Russa really has the sword of Damocles over his head here, because if he tries to crack down on alcohol, he'll be called a hypocrite, and if he doesn't, he's insensitive and not watching out for his players.

Also, there are birds perched on the sword of Damocles.

I don't think he'll be labeled a hypocrite. He knows what he did was wrong, and now, after one of his players lost his life doing the same thing, he realizes it's time to make some changes to help prevent a similar event...at least as much as they can. There is really only so much they can do as an organization. The rest of the responsibility falls on the players themselves. Hopefully they've learned from LaRussa, and tragically, Hancock, and will use better judgement.

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