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Mine/Hah!


Gary

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It's a safety issue at its core. If an infielder is hesitant to haul up on a pop up after hearing a call for it because he knows that overpaid DB is on the basepaths and it ends up in a Jackson-Damon incident, then it is an issue.

I've never seen two infielders collide though. There's really no safety issue because infielders don't run at full speed for simple infield pop ups.

I don't really have a problem with it. ARod just yelled something while running on the basepaths. It's a little league move, if it distracts you, you don't belong in the minors. I've been to games all the time where fans have yelled "I Got It" for popouts, how is it much different. Clark should have been able to recognize his teammate.

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I've been to games all the time where fans have yelled "I Got It" for popouts, how is it much different. Clark should have been able to recognize his teammate.

It's different because the voice was coming from right behind his head, where the shortstop would've been.

It was Clark's first game with the Blue Jays, called up from Triple-A the night before.

The real "tragedy" in all this is that the pitcher during this play was making his MLB debut, facing his first batter when it happened... had A-Rod not done that he would've gotten out of the inning instead of eventually being tagged with a 27.00 ERA

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Sounds like A-Rob knew he was out, couldn't beat the play, so he had to play cheap to play well

If you're not cheating, then you're not playing baseball. --Various baseball players throughout history, most recently attributed to Mark Grace.

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Sounds like A-Rob knew he was out, couldn't beat the play, so he had to play cheap to play well

If you're not cheating, then you're not playing baseball. --Various baseball players throughout history, most recently attributed to Mark Grace.

That actually makes sense, now the Corked bats, and multitudes of players using steroids don't seem so out of the ordinary

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That actually makes sense, now the Corked bats, and multitudes of players using steroids don't seem so out of the ordinary

Hey, I've been pointing this out since I got here. Too bad no one's listenin'... :P

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That actually makes sense, now the Corked bats, and multitudes of players using steroids don't seem so out of the ordinary

Hey, I've been pointing this out since I got here. Too bad no one's listenin'... :P

Outside of the Blue Jays, I don't pay a hell of alot of attention (except Anahien). It's like politics, crooked as a squid's 7th tenticle

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I'm not sure how many of you guys actually played baseball beyond little league, but fake tags and throws are completely different than yelling "MINE!" or "FENCE!" or something similar to distract a player with his head up in the air looking at a baseball.

Fake throws and tags are to keep a runner from advancing an additional base. There isn't a safety concern unless you can't slide properly and somehow injure yourself sliding.

Yelling "MINE!" or "NO ROOM" (this happened to me in HS a couple times on pop flies by the opposing dugout, very bushleague in my eyes) doesn't put you in danger that play. the result of the play is at worst a ball falling for a harmless strike (Foul ball) or single (On the infield)

What happens is then you have 2 players going for a ball (or one going towards a fence) the next time, where their only form of communication since little league is "Yours" or "Mine". Without it you'll have Ryan Freel collisions every game. Not a good thing.

Its against the rules. And more than that, its unsportsmanlike and bush league.

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I debated this for a week.....

Joe Morgan (of all people) brought up a good point: Players are a lot more gentleman-ly on the field these days. Shouting something is one of those proverbial "unwritten rules" (and I challenge anyone to show me where in the MLB Rulebook that specifically says "No shouting at the fielder"). The objective of the game is to win the game. If a MLB infielder is that distracted, he doesn't belong in the big leagues.

It's not cheating if it's not breaking any rule, right?

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I debated this for a week.....

Joe Morgan (of all people) brought up a good point: Players are a lot more gentleman-ly on the field these days. Shouting something is one of those proverbial "unwritten rules" (and I challenge anyone to show me where in the MLB Rulebook that specifically says "No shouting at the fielder"). The objective of the game is to win the game. If a MLB infielder is that distracted, he doesn't belong in the big leagues.

It's not cheating if it's not breaking any rule, right?

It is against MLB rules to attempt to confuse the defensive team, yelling out "Mine!" when behind a fielder making a catch on a pop fly would be attempting to confuse the player.

INTERFERENCE

(a) Offensive interference is an act by the team at bat which interferes with, obstructs, impedes, hinders or confuses any fielder attempting to make a play.

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I debated this for a week.....

Joe Morgan (of all people) brought up a good point: Players are a lot more gentleman-ly on the field these days. Shouting something is one of those proverbial "unwritten rules" (and I challenge anyone to show me where in the MLB Rulebook that specifically says "No shouting at the fielder"). The objective of the game is to win the game. If a MLB infielder is that distracted, he doesn't belong in the big leagues.

It's not cheating if it's not breaking any rule, right?

It is against MLB rules to attempt to confuse the defensive team, yelling out "Mine!" when behind a fielder making a catch on a pop fly would be attempting to confuse the player.

INTERFERENCE

(a) Offensive interference is an act by the team at bat which interferes with, obstructs, impedes, hinders or confuses any fielder attempting to make a play.

So where does it specifically say "Don't say anything to the fielder."? It doesn't.

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It was done in an attempt to confuse the fielder -- if you can come up with another reason why he'd be yelling "mine", then please do. According to the rules, which you state does not cover this point, it is illegal to attempt to confuse the fielder. I think it's clearly against the rules.

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INTERFERENCE

(a) Offensive interference is an act by the team at bat which interferes with, obstructs, impedes, hinders or confuses any fielder attempting to make a play.

So where does it specifically say "Don't say anything to the fielder."? It doesn't.

"Offensive interference is an act by the team at bat which ... confuses any fielder attempting to make a play."

con·fuse (kən-fyōōz')

v. con·fused, con·fus·ing, con·fus·es

a. To cause to be unable to think with clarity or act with intelligence or understanding; throw off.

b. To cause to feel embarrassment.

c. To mistake (for another)

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Whether or not we're dealing with major league players, they're still professionals, and what Rodriguez did was totally and completely unprofessional.

I mean, if you and one of your co-workers are working on something seperate, you wouldn't like it if he come up behind you and started going, "HAY!", would you? Even if he doesn't get caught, it's still not right.

A-Rod is a sissy and his breath smells pissy.

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I mean, if you and one of your co-workers are working on something seperate, you wouldn't like it if he come up behind you and started going, "HAY!", would you? Even if he doesn't get caught, it's still not right.

That's not quite right, is it? That would only fit if Derek Jeter yelled out "HAY!" at A-Rod when they were both going for a pop fly, so the analogy isn't quite accurate. A-Rod works in the same profession as the Toronto Blue Jays -- and yes, they are both technically colleagues in Major League Baseball -- but one is employed by the Yankees and the other guy the Jays. So really, they're not co-workers. Just mortal enemies, apparently.

And for that matter, our boring office jobs are never analogous to fun, exciting professions like stand-up comedy, professional sports, and starring in movies. No one pays us to watch us ply our craft, nor should they. Short of scouring the Internet for things to do that aren't our jobs, what we do during the day isn't very exciting.

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