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Logo problems...


nyjet88

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I have had some issues with my logo. The problem is the stroke (blue) that I created is not smooth. I have done a lot of work to get it to be smooth but it's just not happening. I deleted a lot of anchor points in Illustrator and that did help a lot.

So from last night i had this:

logo-v5.gif

Tonight I have this. Any suggestions on how to get this more smooth?

logo-v6.gif

By the way, I was just typing in the word "more" and I typed in "moore" by mistake. That reminded me of the episode of Seinfeld where George was arguing with the Bubble Boy about moops and moores in a game of trivial pursuit.

Anyone a seinfeld fan?

Thanks for the help.

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and youve commited the cardinal sin of typographic design in your logo.

serif and sans side by side on my keyboard. tut tut.

using serif and sans type together is quite common; it provides good contrast between text and subheads, for example. i don't think this logo is particularly strong, but using serif and sans together is far from a cardinal sin. i was taught this technique from an individual who studied at basel under armin hofmann, emil ruder and wolfgang weingart, so i carry it with me as a pretty reliable piece of knowledge.

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Thanks everyone.

Tempest, I agree with you. The serif and sans type together is common and I do like it for this logo.

Just for the record too, as I do appreciate everyone's help, I am not looking for a crazy logo. This logo get's my name across I feel and I will stick with it, just needs cleaned up.

Now I have tried redrawing the outline but it wasn't working that well. Anyone have any other suggestions besides the blue background behind it?

Thanks again everyone!

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and youve commited the cardinal sin of typographic design in your logo.

serif and sans side by side on my keyboard. tut tut.

using serif and sans type together is quite common; it provides good contrast between text and subheads, for example. i don't think this logo is particularly strong, but using serif and sans together is far from a cardinal sin. i was taught this technique from an individual who studied at basel under armin hofmann, emil ruder and wolfgang weingart, so i carry it with me as a pretty reliable piece of knowledge.

well i wouldnt call the use of serif and sans a technique, there really is nothing too it and of course , like anything, there are instances where this is this is less important and where the two sit fine together (usually where there is great contrast in scale). but where two pieces of type are so similar in scale, i think it applies. it still is one of the fundamentals typographic rules and in this case i think its particularly realevant. im not going to argue that rules arent made to be broken, but there not JUST made to be broken. i think this could do with a change as they dont look right together.

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I do agree with fraser that in this case the two faces don't work well together - I think you could incorporate the word "Design" into the blue block outline, and reverse out the text. I think that will make the words more unified and have a more compact look and feel. Right now, as I mentioned, the "design" element feels disjointed and disconnected from "riemen" - like it was an "oh :censored:, i should add design" kind of addition, something slapped on last minute. I know this probably wasn't the case, but it's something to consider.

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and youve commited the cardinal sin of typographic design in your logo.

serif and sans side by side on my keyboard. tut tut.

using serif and sans type together is quite common; it provides good contrast between text and subheads, for example. i don't think this logo is particularly strong, but using serif and sans together is far from a cardinal sin. i was taught this technique from an individual who studied at basel under armin hofmann, emil ruder and wolfgang weingart, so i carry it with me as a pretty reliable piece of knowledge.

well i wouldnt call the use of serif and sans a technique, there really is nothing too it and of course , like anything, there are instances where this is this is less important and where the two sit fine together (usually where there is great contrast in scale). but where two pieces of type are so similar in scale, i think it applies. it still is one of the fundamentals typographic rules and in this case i think its particularly realevant. im not going to argue that rules arent made to be broken, but there not JUST made to be broken. i think this could do with a change as they dont look right together.

the two faces in this piece are competing in a bad way because of the scale and the fact that the serif font simply isn't a very good typeface, so it definitely is a relevant piece of advice in this instance, but i don't even consider it a rule broken when i use them together. i often use trade gothic bold for headlines and adobe garamond as text on the same document, or adobe garamond semibold smallcaps for subheads and akzidenz grotesk for text. those combinations work great for essays or resumes or style guides and other text-heavy manuals and books.

I am not looking for a crazy logo. This logo gets my name across I feel and I will stick with it, just needs cleaned up.

i agree that you shouldn't be looking for a crazy logo. the problem is, the direction you're going is already too crazy. you'd be better off doing a simple text-only logotype. possibly a small, understated mark to use when space is tight.

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and youve commited the cardinal sin of typographic design in your logo.

serif and sans side by side on my keyboard. tut tut.

using serif and sans type together is quite common; it provides good contrast between text and subheads, for example. i don't think this logo is particularly strong, but using serif and sans together is far from a cardinal sin. i was taught this technique from an individual who studied at basel under armin hofmann, emil ruder and wolfgang weingart, so i carry it with me as a pretty reliable piece of knowledge.

well i wouldnt call the use of serif and sans a technique, there really is nothing too it and of course , like anything, there are instances where this is this is less important and where the two sit fine together (usually where there is great contrast in scale). but where two pieces of type are so similar in scale, i think it applies. it still is one of the fundamentals typographic rules and in this case i think its particularly realevant. im not going to argue that rules arent made to be broken, but there not JUST made to be broken. i think this could do with a change as they dont look right together.

the two faces in this piece are competing in a bad way because of the scale and the fact that the serif font simply isn't a very good typeface, so it definitely is a relevant piece of advice in this instance, but i don't even consider it a rule broken when i use them together. i often use trade gothic bold for headlines and adobe garamond as text on the same document, or adobe garamond semibold smallcaps for subheads and akzidenz grotesk for text. those combinations work great for essays or resumes or style guides and other text-heavy manuals and books.

I am not looking for a crazy logo. This logo gets my name across I feel and I will stick with it, just needs cleaned up.

i agree that you shouldn't be looking for a crazy logo. the problem is, the direction you're going is already too crazy. you'd be better off doing a simple text-only logotype. possibly a small, understated mark to use when space is tight.

Do you have any examples of what you are talking about?

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If you consider what the logo is for, what gordie posted says design to me. Not that what nyjet88 posted is bad, it's just that I see it as a logo for beer, brats or pretzels or some other similar product. If this is for a designer or design house, nyjet88 should scrap his design and start over.

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Thanks for all the input.

I honestly want to keep this font. I purchased it from letterheadfonts.com.

What else does anyone reccomend and are there any different colors you might suggest?

Thanks everyone, I appreciate the feedback.

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  • 2 weeks later...

two quickest changes I would make... take the warp off completely... doesn't work with that font, as that font feels old, and warping text is a technique that doesn't seem to me to fit with the chronologic feel of the font ... that, and the warped main text with unwarped "design" is bugging the heck out of me...

and do what was suggested above... extend the blue box down, and reverse out the "design"... either in white or gold...

you'd get an interesting border out of that too... treat the whole blue shape like a rectangle, except for the R, which protrudes from the shape and thus adds a subtle interest to the design... compositiionally, it would balance too... the R on the left, and the additional "design" text on the right...

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