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Players in the "wrong" uniforms

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Bears HOFer Richard Dent also finished up with the Eagles

 

new-york-giants-tiki-barber-and-philadel

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Apologies if this is somewhere in the thread already, but Larry Bird once played a doubleheader for Indiana State’s baseball team:

 

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The story:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.sbnation.com/platform/amp/2020/4/28/21240080/larry-bird-college-baseball-indiana-state-he-was-good

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Two years ago today, we lost this beauty.

 

Ray_Emery_AHL_Tryout.jpg

 

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Wow, I don't remeber Emery playing for those teams at all!

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I was just going to say the same. I remember the Ducks but not the Lightning. 

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Bobby Hull, 6 pre-season games.

 

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206030-13171141Fr.jpg

 

I find this card funny, as Nolan Ryan and Rod Carew are more well know for works on other teams.

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Craig Kimbrel 👀

 

Kimbrel shaved his beard. : baseball

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He spent the most time with the Marlins, so I'd say Emilio Bonifacio in a Nationals uniform looks wrong. (Plus, even if he does somehow manage to revive his career with the Nats this year, it won't be in these uniforms.) 

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That road uniform is really nice.  I think it was the best part of the package Radom put together.  Just make the number solid navy and put the DC on the cap and you've got a winner.

 

The home version didn't work as well - can't put my finger on why, but it just didn't.  Regardless, the scripts are the way to go (but I'd still use DC).  

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On 7/24/2020 at 11:16 PM, Davidellias said:

206030-13171141Fr.jpg

 

I find this card funny, as Nolan Ryan and Rod Carew are more well know for works on other teams.

 

Carew yes; but Ryan no.

 

Ryan is definitely more strongly associated as a player with the Angels than with his other three teams. It's with the Angels that he became a superstar, broke Koufax's strikeout record, and threw four no-hitters.  

 

His latter-day stint with the Rangers is fondly remembered because he was still performing at a very high level at an advanced age, throwing two more no hitters in his forties, and topping off his amazing career totals. Also, he went into that team's front office, and still maintains an association with the team.

 

But we should remember that he was already a legend when he came to the Rangers, on the strength of what he had done mainly with the Angels, and secondarily with the Astros. As a player, Nolan Ryan will always be first and foremost a California Angel.

 

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9 hours ago, Ferdinand Cesarano said:

 

Carew yes; but Ryan no.

 

Ryan is definitely more strongly associated as a player with the Angels than with his other three teams. It's with the Angels that he became a superstar, broke Koufax's strikeout record, and threw four no-hitters.  

 

His latter-day stint with the Rangers is fondly remembered because he was still performing at a very high level at an advanced age, throwing two more no hitters in his forties, and topping off his amazing career totals. Also, he went into that team's front office, and still maintains an association with the team.

 

But we should remember that he was already a legend when he came to the Rangers, on the strength of what he had done mainly with the Angels, and secondarily with the Astros. As a player, Nolan Ryan will always be first and foremost a California Angel.

 

 

I think this is incorrect, but age plays a big role in it.  To me, he's an Astro first, then a Ranger. 

 

I'm in my 40s so I'm not a youngster.  I collected enough baseball cards as a kid to know that he was a Met and then a star with the Angels.  I know that he was dominant with the Angels, and then with a few exceptions, barely above average (let's be honest here) afterwards.  He either struck out 20 or got shelled.  But... it was with the Astros that most people in their 30s/40s got to see him, it was with the Astros (I think) that he had reached the tenure necessary to start setting career marks, and with the Astros that he got a little more national exposure simply due to the national TV.

 

Speaking of that, that's why I think the Rangers are 2nd (but maybe 1st) because even though he was mostly washed up and was one of those guys that simply held on long enough to get to 300 wins (though again - it was either no-hitter or he got killed), it was with the Rangers that he was on Sports Center every time he started, and when he got in that fight, and he was always labeled a "Texas guy".

 

You're correct that his best years by far were with the Angels, but I really think he's more associated with either of the Texas teams.

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Mike Green just retired. He only wore an Oilers uniform for two games. spacer.png

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I don’t know if role players really have ‘right’ uniforms, but I found Patty Mills in a Blazers uniform pretty jarring

 

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In honour of the great Tom Seaver, here he is sporting Yankee gear.

 

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Seaver and the entire Yankee broadcast team wore this cap and jacket on July 4, 1989, the 60th anniversary of Lou Gehrig's famous speech.

 

Seaver has a couple of connections with Yankee history. The huge ovation that he received from the Yankee Stadium crowd in his first appearance in New York after his trade to Cincinnati, at the 1977 All-Star Game — an ovation that dwarfed that given to Billy Martin or Thurman Munson or any other Yankee — underscored Seaver's unique position as New York's most beloved sports figure, and one who was above all team partisanship.

 

And, of course, that would not be the last time that Seaver would intersect with Yankee history, nor the last time that he would be saluted by the Yankee Stadium crowd. The remarkable coincidence that had him going for his 300th win in 1985 in a Yankee Stadium that was packed for Phil Rizzuto Day was like a gift from the Universe. On that day Seaver performed the most unlikely feat of all: turning a Yankee Stadium crowd to cheer against the Yankees. Such was his stature with Yankee fans.

 

There was no way to anticipate that the then-40-year-old Seaver would throw a complete game; yet, somehow, the Yankees were prepared for this, as they had arranged to bring in longtime Met announcer Lindsey Nelson to call the ninth inning on television. The Yankees' tribute to Seaver was thus total, coming both spontaneously from the Yankee fans, and also officially from the team.

 

Seaver's long run in the Yankees' broadcast booth bantering with the Scooter only further cemented his place in Yankee history, and ever more strongly endeared him to Yankee fans, who stand alongside Met fans in mourning of this great champion.

 

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